tailwindcss-lerp-colors
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1.2.20 • Public • Published

Lerp Colors for Tailwind CSS

“Lerp” = (L)inear Int(erp)olation

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Tailwind Lerp Colors programmatically interpolates between any default and extended colors in a Tailwind config for additional color stops (e.g. red-425, gray-950).


Table of Contents


Installation

Install the function from npm:

npm i -D tailwind-lerp-colors

Then add the function to your tailwind.config.js file. It's recommended to use tailwind-lerp-colors in theme.colors and NOT theme.extend.colors as the function will only interpolate colors passed into its object, and using theme.extend.colors generally implies you're relying on leaving theme.colors as-is to keep the standard Tailwind colors. That route, the standard colors would not be interpolated along with your custom colors.

As a convenience, there is a includeBase property which can be passed into the options (though it's enabled by default) which automate importing Tailwind's base colors, so you do not need to pass them in manually. As a convenience, there is a includeBase property which can be passed into the options (though it's enabled by default) which automatically imports Tailwind's base colors so you don't need to pass them in manually.

Also, if you rely on some of Tailwind's legacy color names (lightBlue, warmGray, trueGray, coolGray, blueGray), you can enable the includeLegacy property by setting it to true to include those legacy colors as well, though it's recommended by the Tailwind team to alias those legacy color names directly in your Tailwind config and not rely on Tailwind's require('tailwindcss/colors') to add those for you, as that will produce a warning. More info on that can be found on the official Tailwind CSS website here.

If you want to interpolate a group of named colors, use the lerpColors (plural) function like this:

// tailwind.config.js
const { lerpColors } = require('tailwind-lerp-colors');

module.exports = {
  theme: {
    colors: lerpColors({
      coral: coralShades,
    }, {
      // function options (all optional)
      includeBase: true,
      includeLegacy: false,
      lerpEnds: true,
      interval: 25,
      mode: 'lrgb',
    })
  },
}

If you want to interpolate a single color, use the lerpColor (singular) function like this:

// tailwind.config.js
const { lerpColor } = require('tailwind-lerp-colors');

module.exports = {
  theme: {
    colors: {
      coral: lerpColor(coralShades, {
        lerpEnds: true,
        interval: 25,
        mode: 'lrgb',
      }),
    }
  },
}

ℹ️ One important distinction here between the options for lerpColors and lerpColor is that includeBase and includeLegacy are not available for lerpColor as it's only interpolating a single color, so there's no need to include the base colors.

Usage

tailwind-lerp-colors works without using any options, so if you're good with the default options (listed below in the "Advanced usage" example), this should work for you:

Simple usage:

// tailwind.config.js
theme: {
  colors: lerpColors({
    // your colors
  })
}

Alternatively, if you want more flexibility, you can invoke the tailwind-lerp-colors function with an options object.

Advanced usage:

// tailwind.config.js
theme: {
  colors: lerpColors({
    // your colors
  }, {
    // function options (all optional)
    includeBase: true,
    includeLegacy: false,
    lerpEnds: true,
    interval: 25,
    mode: 'lrgb',
  })
}

The values listed above are all the options currently supported and their default values. Using the above would render the exact same result as the simple usage listed prior.

Every option in the options object is entirely optional and falls back to its respective default option when omitted.

Options explained:

  • includeBase (boolean) determines whether or not to include Tailwind's base colors in the interpolation and final colors. In Tailwind v3.x, all Tailwind base colors are enabled by default for use with the JIT compiler.

    This setting follows the same methodology and includes all Tailwind base colors in the interpolation of your colors, even if they are not explicitly listed in your Tailwind config. When this option is enabled, the base colors are included at a lower priority, so any colors of the same name you list in your Tailwind config will still override the base colors as they normally would.

    If this setting is disabled, the function will only interpolate colors explicitly listed in your Tailwind config.

  • includeLegacy (boolean) will include Tailwind's legacy color names (lightBlue, warmGray, trueGray, coolGray, blueGray) in the final colors output by tailwind-lerp-colors. As mentioned above, it's recommended by the Tailwind team to alias those legacy color names directly in your Tailwind config and not rely on Tailwind's require('tailwindcss/colors') to add those for you, as that will produce a warning. More info on that can be found on the official Tailwind CSS website here.

    ** includeBase must be set to true in order for includeLegacy to work

  • lerpEnds (boolean) will include interpolation past the bounds of the colors included in the provided palette. For example, assuming a color brown is included in Tailwind config colors, where brown-50 is the lightest shade and brown-900 is the darkest shade, the function—when enabled—would interpolate between white (#fff) and brown-50 and between black (#000) and brown-900 to expose lighter and darker shades of every color than those included in the palette.

  • interval (number, positive integer) sets the interval at which to interpolate colors. For example, with the default value of 25, between red-100 and red-200, it would interpolate the additional values red-125, red-150, and red-175. To include only the “halfway” values and not “quarter” values, you could pass an interval value of 50 which would only interpolate red-150 between red-100 and red-200. To interpolate every single value between each shade, you can pass a value of 1, which would expose red-101, red-102, red-103, …, red-899 per the default colors (including red-0 and red-1000 if lerpEnds is enabled).

    It's important to note that each color's default intervals must be evenly divisible by the interval passed in this function, so it's recommended to use a naming convention similar to the one included in Tailwind by default:

    50, 100, 200, 300, 400, 500, 600, 700, 800, 900
    

    If one of your colors uses keys like the aqua example below (0-9 rather than 50-900), you'll need to use an interval that divides evenly into those numeric keys, such as 0.25.

    aqua: {
      0: '#eefdf8',
      1: '#cffbeb',
      2: '#a0f5da',
      3: '#66e9c6',
      4: '#31d4ad',
      5: '#12b995',
      6: '#0a9579',
      7: '#0b7763',
      8: '#0d5f50',
      9: '#0e4e43',
    }

    While using an interval like 25 would not be compatible with a color like the one listed above, rest assured this conflict will neither break the function or your Tailwind config nor even exclude the color. Any color that is found to be incompatible with the interval value, whether because of a divisibility issue like in the aqua example above or because the color is a simple string (e.g. brand-primary: '#c000ff'), these colors will simply skip the interpolation step and be re-included into the new colors as-is.

  • mode (string, must be value from list, see below) allows you to interpolate using the color mode of your choice for better color interpolation. This helps to avoid gray dead zones (more info on that here). This is especially useful when interpolating between colors of different hues.

    What this means at a larger scale is you can create beautiful palettes of colors using as few as two colors and letting tailwind-lerp-colors do the heavy lifting, interpolating between them.

    The accepted values for mode are:

    • lrgb (default)
    • rgb
    • lab
    • lch
    • hcl
    • num
    • hcg
    • oklch
    • hsi
    • hsl
    • hsv
    • oklab

Roadmap

I have a few improvements planned already, and I am always open to feature requests and bug reports.

Here are some of the features I have planned:

  • a function option that allows users to more effectively control the rate at which the function interpolates between different colors, which would also allow for better luminosity matching with the base color palettes included in Tailwind

  • filtering options, so users can define which colors they do or don't want to interpolate on

  • itemized options, so that options can be uniquely set per color

Contributing

Pull requests are welcome. For major changes, please open an issue first to discuss what you would like to change.

Please run tests where appropriate to help streamline the review and deployment process.

Support

While you can always support me via Buy Me a Coffee, the best way to support me and this development is actually to contribute. Every bit of feedback helps me to develop tools the way you as users want them. Thanks!

Also, while I developed this function, much of the ✨magic✨ working behind the scenes runs on Chroma.js, built by Gregor Aisch and contributed to by many! Chroma.js is an incredible tool that powers much of the crazy color interactions you see on the web, so definitely pay the Chroma.js repo a visit.

License

MIT

Recommendations

If you liked this, you might also like my other Tailwind CSS plugins:

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npm i tailwindcss-lerp-colors

Weekly Downloads

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Version

1.2.20

License

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  • brandonmcconnell