vue-class-setup
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1.4.4 • Public • Published

vue-class-setup

Use class style to write setup and support vue2 and vue3

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Why?

Using class can help you avoid ref, reactive , computed and withDefaults, and significantly reduce your mental burden and better organize your code. It supports vue2 and vue3 at the same time. After gzip compression, it is only 1KB

vue-class-component vs vue-class-setup

We should deprecate vue-class-component, and use class in setup

List vue-class-component vue-class-setup
Vue2
Vue3
Method bind this
Props type check
Emit type check
Watch type check
Multiple class instances
Class attribute sets the default value of the prop

Install

npm install vue-class-setup
# or
yarn add vue-class-setup

Quick start

<script lang="ts">
import { defineComponent } from 'vue';
import { Setup, Context } from 'vue-class-setup';

// Setup and Context must work together
@Setup
class App extends Context {
    private _value = 0;
    public get text() {
        return String(this._value);
    }
    public set text(text: string) {
        this._value = Number(text);
    }
    public onClick() {
        this._value++;
    }
}
export default defineComponent({
    // Inject setup
    ...App.inject(),
});
</script>
<template>
    <div>
        <p>{{ text }}</p>
        <button @click="onClick()"></button>
    </div>
</template>

Setup and Context collect dependency information together, and convert it into a Vue program after executing the subclass constructor

Setup

If the component defines props, writing the class in the setup will cause the setup function to create a class every time as it executes, which will add costs. So we should avoid writing class in setup and use Define basic class to receive props and emit.

Context and Define

Context automatic injection $vm, Define extend from Context, and Define will automatically inject $props and $emit, when encapsulating public classes, you may not want to inject props and emit

Best practices

<script lang="ts">
import { defineComponent } from 'vue';
import { Setup, Define } from 'vue-class-setup';

// You can create multiple setup class, Only one is shown here
@Setup
class App extends Define<Props, Emit> {
    // ✨ The default value of the prop can only be initialized in the constructor,
    // ✨ and cannot be modified later. It is only read-only
    public readonly dest = '--';
    // Automatically convert to vue 'computed'
    public get text() {
        return String(this.value);
    }
    public click(evt: MouseEvent) {
        this.$emit('click', evt);
    }
}
/**
 * You can directly call the injection method here
 * or manually inject in the setup function
 * <script lang="ts" setup>
 *      const app = new App();
 * <\/script>
 * <template>
 *      <div>{{ app.text }}</div>
 * </template>
 */
export default defineComponent({
    ...App.inject(),
});
</script>
<script lang="ts" setup>
// Props and Emits need to be exported
export interface Props {
    value: number;
    dest?: string;
}
export interface Emit {
    (event: 'click', evt: MouseEvent): void;
}
// Variable reception must be used, otherwise Vue compilation error
// ❌ const props = defineProps<Props>();
// ❌ const emit = defineEmits<Emit>();
defineProps<Props>(); //
defineEmits<Emit>(); //

// You should define default values directly on the class
// ❌ withDefaults(defineProps<Props>(), { dest: '--' });
// ✅ @Setup
// ✅ class App extends Define<Props, Emit> {
// ✅     public readonly dest = '--'
// ✅ }

// Automatic dependency injection and reactive
// const app = reactive(new App()); // ❌
// const app = new App();           // ✅
</script>
<template>
    <button class="btn" @click="click($event)">
        <span class="text">{{ text }}</span>
        <span class="props-dest">{{ dest }}</span>
        <span class="props-value">{{ $props.value }}</span>
    </button>
</template>

Multiple class instances

When the business is complex, multiple instances should be split

<script lang="ts">
import { onBeforeMount, onMounted } from 'vue';
import { Setup, Context, PassOnTo } from 'vue-class-setup';

@Setup
class Base extends Context {
    public value = 0;
    public get text() {
        return String(this.value);
    }
    @PassOnTo(onBeforeMount)
    public init() {
        this.value++;
    }
}

@Setup
class Left extends Base {
    public left = 0;
    public get text() {
        return String(`value:${this.value}`);
    }
    public init() {
        super.init();
        this.value++;
    }
    @PassOnTo(onMounted)
    public initLeft() {
        this.left++;
    }
}

@Setup
class Right extends Base {
    public right = 0;
    public init() {
        super.init();
        this.value++;
    }
    @PassOnTo(onMounted)
    public initLeft() {
        this.right++;
    }
}
</script>
<script setup lang="ts">
const left = new Left();
const right = new Right();
</script>
<template>
    <p class="left">{{ left.text }}</p>
    <p class="right">{{ right.text }}</p>
</template>

PassOnTo

This callback will be called back after the Test class instantiation is completed, and the decorated function will be passed in, and the TS can check whether the type is correct

@Setup
class App extends Define {
    @PassOnTo(myFunc)
    public init(name: string) {}
}

function myFunc(callback: (name: string) => void) {
    // ...
}

If PassOnTo does not pass in a handler, it is called after reactive and computed execution are completed, You should avoid watching in the constructor because it may not have reactive

import { Watch } from 'vue';

@Setup
class App extends Define {
    public value = 0;
    @PassOnTo()
    private setup() {
        // You can safely watch, but it is recommended to use the Watch decorator
        watch(
            () => this.value,
            (value) => {
                // ...
            }
        );
    }
}

Watch

It can correctly identify the type

<script lang="ts">
import { Setup, Watch, Context } from 'vue-class-setup';

@Setup
class App extends Context {
    public value = 0;
    public immediateValue = 0;
    public onClick() {
        this.value++;
    }
    @Watch('value')
    public watchValue(value: number, oldValue: number) {
        if (value > 100) {
            this.value = 100;
        }
    }
    @Watch('value', { immediate: true })
    public watchImmediateValue(value: number, oldValue: number | undefined) {
        if (typeof oldValue === 'undefined') {
            this.immediateValue = 10;
        } else {
            this.immediateValue++;
        }
    }
}
</script>
<script setup lang="ts">
const app = new App();
</script>
<template>
    <p class="value">{{ app.value }}</p>
    <p class="immediate-value">{{ app.immediateValue }}</p>
    <button @click="app.onClick()">Add</button>
</template>

Get the injection object in setup

Useful when defineExpose

<script lang="ts">
import { defineComponent } from 'vue';
import { Setup, Context } from 'vue-class-setup';

@Setup
class App extends Context {
    private _value = 0;
    public get text() {
        return String(this._value);
    }
    public set text(text: string) {
        this._value = Number(text);
    }
    public addValue() {
        this._value++;
    }
}
export default defineComponent({
    ...App.inject(),
});
</script>
<script lang="ts" setup>
const app = App.use();

defineExpose({
    addValue: app.addValue,
});
</script>
<template>
    <div>
        <p class="text">{{ text }}</p>
        <p class="text-eq">{{ app.text === text }}</p>
        <button @click="addValue"></button>
    </div>
</template>

Vue compatible

  • getCurrentInstance returns the proxy object by default
  • VueInstance It is not easy to get a Vue instance object type compatible with vue2 and vue3. We make it easy
import {
    isVue2,
    isVue3,
    getCurrentInstance,
    type VueInstance,
} from 'vue-class-setup';

// isVue2 -> boolean
// isVue3 -> boolean
// getCurrentInstance -> VueInstance

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Install

npm i vue-class-setup

Weekly Downloads

153

Version

1.4.4

License

MIT

Unpacked Size

103 kB

Total Files

74

Last publish

Collaborators

  • gensssss