react-native-stager
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    1.0.0 • Public • Published

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    react-native-stager

    A performant wizard-like multi stages component for React Native without a router

    Why?

    Using a router solution to create a multi-step wizard-like interface is good, but sometimes you want to keep all your state in just one parent component without having to rely on redux for example, enter the Stager

    How?

    import React from 'react'
    import { View, TouchableOpacity, Text } from 'react-native'
    import Stager, { Stage } from 'react-native-stager'
     
    class MyWizard extends React.Component {
      render() {
        return (
          <Stager onChange={(stage, direction) => {
            // stage == step 1 || step 2
            // direction = 1 = next | -1 = prev | 0 = reset / initial
          }}>
            <Stage key="step 1" continue={() => true}>
              {({ instance, context }) => (
                <View>
                  <TouchableOpacity onPress={context.notify}>
                    <Text>{'Hello'}</Text>
                  </TouchableOpacity>
                </View>
              )}
            </Stage>
     
            <Stage key="step 2" noPrevious loaded={(cb) => this.setState({ loaded: true }, cb)}>
              {() => (
                <Text>{'World'}</Text>
              )}
            </Stage>
          </Stager>
        )
      }
    }
     
    export default MyWizard

    Components and API

    Stager

    The root component that will hold the steps. Accepts an onChange prop that receives the transitioning stage name and the direction (-1 = prev / 1 = next / 0 = reset/initial). Can be safely nested.

    <Stager onChange={(stage, direction) => {
      // do something nice
      }}>
    <Stager>

    Stage

    Need to set inside Stager. Can use continue, noPrevious and loaded props. Notice that the children must always be a function. The key prop is required.

    It receives an object with instance (this current Stage) and context (the current Stager)

    <Stager>
      <Stage key="step 1">
        {({ instance, context }) => (
          <Text>{'This is step 1'}</Text>
        )}
      </Stage>
    </Stager>

    When using continue, you always need to signal to the Stage that it should re-evaluate the continue function, to see if you're able to continue. This is so the component doesn't re-render everytime everytime a children changes.

    <Stager>
      <Stage
        key="step 1"
        continue={() => this.state.canContinue}
        >
        {({ instance, context }) => (
          <View>
            <Text>{'This is step 1'}</Text>
            <Button title="can continue" onPress={() => {
              this.setState({
                canContinue: true
              }, instance.refresh)
            }} />
          </View>
        )}
      </Stage>
     
      <Stage
        key="step 2"
        loaded={(cb) => this.setState({ canContinue: false }, cb)}
        continue={() => this.state.canContinue}
        >
        {({ instance, context }) => (
          <View>
            <Text>{'This is step 1'}</Text>
            <Button title="can continue" onPress={() => {
              this.setState({
                canContinue: true
              }, instance.refresh)
            }} />
          </View>
        )}
      </Stage>
    </Stager>

    StageButtons

    The internal implementation of the StageButtons are merely for a quick prototype standpoint (to get the stage going), and you should style if using your own. It doesn't matter where you put them, they will always be below the current active stage. Notice that you CAN set the style to use position: absolute and place it anywhere in the stage.

    <Stager>
      <StageButtons>
        {({ context }) => (
          <View>
            <Button title="<" onPress={context.prev} />
            <Button title=">" onPress={context.next} />
          </View>
        )}
      </StageButtons>
    </Stager>

    StageProgress

    The same thing with StageButtons, it's just an ugly placeholder to show functionality. Replace it with your own

    <Stager>
      <StageProgress>
        {({ context }) => (
          <View key="progress" style={styles.progressView}>
            <View  style={styles.progressOutterFlex}>
              <View style={styles.progressFlex}>
                {context.state.stages.map((stage, index) => (
                    <View key={index} style={[
                      styles.progressIndicator,
                      {
                        flex: (1 / context.state.stages.length) / 2,
                      },
                      {
                        backgroundColor: context.state.currentStage && context.state.stages.indexOf(stage) <= context.state.stages.indexOf(context.state.currentStage) ? 'blue' : 'gray'
                      }
                     ]} />
                  )
                )}
              </View>
              <View style={styles.progressPad} />
            </View>
          </View>
        )}
      </StageProgress>
    </Stager>

    Caveats

    • Since you need to use function children, your shouldComponentUpdate might go crazy. To counter that assign a class member for your function that returns your component
    • The default progress and prev / next buttons are dull, and most likely won't match your application style. For that, use StageProgress and StageButtons wherever you feel like it
    • Children Stage won't automatically update (since Stage has shouldComponentUpdate to return false), so you need, on the instance, to call refresh whenever you need to update your prev / next buttons

    License

    MIT

    Install

    npm i react-native-stager

    DownloadsWeekly Downloads

    5

    Version

    1.0.0

    License

    MIT

    Last publish

    Collaborators

    • pocesar