piral-ng
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1.5.4 • Public • Published

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This is a plugin that only has a peer dependency to rxjs, @angular/core and related packages. What piral-ng brings to the table is a set of Pilet API extensions that can be used with piral or piral-core.

The set includes an Angular converter for any component registration, as well as a fromNg shortcut, a defineNgModule function, and a NgExtension component.

By default, these API extensions are not integrated in piral, so you'd need to add them to your Piral instance.

Documentation

The following functions are brought to the Pilet API.

defineNgModule()

Communicates the usage of a pre-defined Angular module to Piral. Components declared/exported in the module will be bootstrapped within this module.

fromNg()

Transforms a standard Angular component into a component that can be used in Piral, essentially wrapping it with a reference to the corresponding converter.

NgExtension

The extension slot module to be used in Angular components. This is not really needed, as it is made available automatically via an Angular custom element named extension-component.

Usage

::: summary: For pilet authors

You can use the fromNg function from the Pilet API to convert your Angular components to components usable by your Piral instance.

Example Usage

import { PiletApi } from '<name-of-piral-instance>';
import { AngularPage } from './AngularPage';

export function setup(piral: PiletApi) {
  piral.registerPage('/sample', piral.fromNg(AngularPage));
}

We recommend that you still put these components into modules as you would normally do. In order for Piral to use that module you need to define it first. This also allows you to use special Piral declarations such as the NgExtension or the ResourceUrlPipe. All these declarations come with the SharedModule available via import from piral-ng-common.

Example (app) module:

import { NgModule } from '@angular/core';
import { SharedModule } from 'piral-ng-common';
import { AngularPage } from './AngularPage';

@NgModule({
  imports: [SharedModule],
  declarations: [AngularPage],
  exports: [AngularPage]
})
export class AppModule {}

Now the example above changes:

import { PiletApi } from '<name-of-piral-instance>';
import { AppModule } from './AppModule';
import { AngularPage } from './AngularPage';

export function setup(piral: PiletApi) {
  // this "teaches" Piral about the given module
  piral.defineNgModule(AppModule);

  // since we export the AngularPage from the defined module
  // Piral will use the AppModule for bootstrapping the Ng app
  piral.registerPage('/sample', piral.fromNg(AngularPage));
}

Lazy Loading

Even better, you can also lazy load the respective Angular module and components using the callback-based overload of defineNgModule:

import { PiletApi } from '<name-of-piral-instance>';

export function setup(piral: PiletApi) {
  // this "teaches" Piral about the given module, which is lazy loaded
  // important; in this case `./AppModule.ts` has a `default` export
  const loadComponent = piral.defineNgModule(() => import('./AppModule'));

  // to fully lazy load we cannot reference the class anymore;
  // instead we reference the selector of the component
  piral.registerPage('/sample', loadComponent('angular-page'));
}

In the example above, the AngularPage would have been defined to look like

// ...
@Component({
  // ...
  selector: 'angular-page',
})
export class AngularPage { /* ... */ }

which defines the selector (angular-page) matching the specified selector in the setup function.

Standalone Components

The piral-ng plugin also supports Angular standalone components as rendering source.

Standalone components can also be used with lazy loading.

import { PiletApi } from '<name-of-piral-instance>';

export function setup(piral: PiletApi) {
  // Just make sure that `AngularPage` exports the component as `default` export
  piral.registerPage('/sample', piral.fromNg(() => import('./AngularPage')));
}

Angular Options

You can optionally provide Options to defineNgModule, which are identical to those given to bootstrapModule during the Angular boot process. See https://angular.io/api/core/PlatformRef#bootstrapModule for possible values.

This is mainly used to allow an Angular Pilet to run without zone.js as described here.

import { PiletApi } from '<name-of-piral-instance>';
import { AppModule } from './AppModule';
import { AngularPage } from './AngularPage';

export function setup(piral: PiletApi) {
  piral.defineNgModule(AppModule, { ngZone: 'noop' });

  piral.registerPage('/sample', piral.fromNg(AngularPage));
}

Within Angular components the Piral Angular extension component can be used by referring to extension-component, e.g.,

<extension-component name="name-of-extension"></extension-component>

For specifying params you may use data binding. Example:

<extension-component name="foo" [params]="{ foo: 2, bar: 'hello' }"></extension-component>

The ResourceUrlPipe is there to get the correct paths for images that are just copied to the output directory. The pipe can be used in HTML like this:

<img width="250" [src]="'images/coffee.jpg' | resourceUrl" alt="Coffee" />

In the example the relative path images/coffee.jpg will be expanded to a full URL rooted at the pilet's origin.

Alternatively, if piral-ng has not been added to the Piral instance you can install and use the package also from a pilet directly.

import { PiletApi } from '<name-of-piral-instance>';
import { fromNg } from 'piral-ng/convert';
import { AngularPage } from './AngularPage';

export function setup(piral: PiletApi) {
  piral.registerPage('/sample', fromNg(AngularPage));
}

Also, here you can make use of the defineNgModule function:

import { PiletApi } from '<name-of-piral-instance>';
import { fromNg, defineNgModule } from 'piral-ng/convert';
import { AngularPage } from './AngularPage';
import { AngularModule } from './AngularModule';

export function setup(piral: PiletApi) {
  defineNgModule(AngularModule);

  piral.registerPage('/sample', fromNg(AngularPage));
}

For components, such as the AngularPage a template should be specified.

import { Component } from '@angular/core';

@Component({
  template: `
    <div class="page">
      <h3>Angular Page: {{ counter }}</h3>
      <button (click)="increment()">Increment</button>
      <button (click)="decrement()">Decrement</button>
    </div>
  `,
})
export class AngularPage {
  public counter = 0;

  constructor() {}

  increment() {
    this.counter += 1;
  }

  decrement() {
    this.counter -= 1;
  }
}

If you don't want to inline the template then just require the contents, e.g.,

// ...
@Component({
  template: require('./AngularPage.html'),
})
export class AngularPage { /* ... */ }

where you may need to tell your bundler how to treat these HTML files (i.e., transform these references to strings directly in the bundle).

As an alternative, consider using Webpack with the @ngtools/webpack library. This allows you have a webpack.config.js like:

const { AngularWebpackPlugin } = require('@ngtools/webpack');
const CopyPlugin = require("copy-webpack-plugin");
const { resolve } = require("path");

module.exports = (config) => {
  config.module.rules.filter(m => m.test.toString() === /\.css$/i.toString()).forEach(m => {
    m.exclude = /\.component.css$/i;
  });

  config.module.rules.filter(m => m.test.toString() === /\.s[ac]ss$/i.toString()).forEach(m => {
    m.exclude = /\.component.s[ac]ss$/i;
  });

  const cssLoaderNoModule = {
    loader: require.resolve('css-loader'),
    options: {
      esModule: false,
    },
  };

  const htmlLoaderNoModule = {
    loader: require.resolve('html-loader'),
    options: {
      esModule: false,
    },
  };

  const ruleIndex = config.module.rules.findIndex(m => m.test.toString() === /\.tsx?$/i.toString());

  config.module.rules.splice(ruleIndex, 1,
    {
      test: /\.[jt]sx?$/,
      loader: '@ngtools/webpack',
    },
    {
      test: /\.component.html$/i,
      use: ["to-string-loader", htmlLoaderNoModule],
    },
    {
      test: /\.component.css$/i,
      use: ["to-string-loader", cssLoaderNoModule],
    },
    {
      test: /\.component.s[ac]ss$/i,
      use: ["to-string-loader", cssLoaderNoModule, "sass-loader"],
    });

  config.plugins.push(
    new AngularWebpackPlugin({
      tsconfig: 'tsconfig.json',
      jitMode: true,
    }),
    new CopyPlugin({
      patterns: [
        { from: resolve(__dirname, "src/assets") },
      ],
    }),
  )


  return config;
};

Note: You must install these dependencies (also things like copy-webpack-plugin) yourself. piral-ng does not come with any dependencies for development.

:::

::: summary: For Piral instance developers

The provided library only brings API extensions for pilets to a Piral instance. The Piral instance still needs to be configured properly to support Angular 2+.

The following (Angular) packages should be installed:

  • @angular/common
  • @angular/core
  • @angular/platform-browser
  • @angular/platform-browser-dynamic
  • @angular/router
  • rxjs

The following polyfills/vendor libs should be imported before any other package.

import 'core-js/es/reflect';
import 'core-js/stable/reflect';
import 'core-js/features/reflect';
import 'zone.js';

For the setup itself you'll need to import createNgApi from the piral-ng package.

import { createNgApi } from 'piral-ng';

The integration looks like:

const instance = createInstance({
  // important part
  plugins: [createNgApi()],
  // ...
});

The related packages should be shared with the pilets via the package.json:

{
  "importmap": {
    "imports": {
      "@angular/common": "",
      "@angular/compiler": "",
      "@angular/core": "",
      "@angular/platform-browser": "",
      "@angular/platform-browser-dynamic": "",
      "piral-ng-common": "",
      "rxjs": "",
      "zone.js": ""
    }
  }
}

Depending on your Angular needs you'd want to share more packages.

:::

Injected Services

Depending on the mounted component different services are injected. the following table lists the names of the injected services per component type.

Important: These are all meant as constructor injectors. As injected services are always singletons in Angular you will never receive a changed value on them. Therefore, only use these values in the constructor and don't capture them. You might capture / store values inside the props (e.g., props.params), but don't capture the injected props. Instead, use @Input (see next section) if you need to continuously monitor the props.

Component Props Piral Context
Tile Props piral Context
Page Props piral Context
Modal Props piral Context
Extension Props piral Context
Menu Props piral Context

To use such a service the @Inject decorator should be used with the explicit name.

The following code snippet illustrates the injection of the Props service from an TileProps interface into a sample tile component.

@Component({
  template: `
    <div class="tile">
      <p>{{ rows }} rows and {{ cols }} columns</p>
    </div>
  `,
})
export class SampleTileComponent {
  constructor(@Inject('Props') props: TileComponentProps<any>) {
    this.rows = props.rows;
    this.cols = props.columns;
  }
}

Dynamic Props

For Props there is also the possibility to use @Input for making them reactive, i.e., notify the Angular component when they changed.

@Component({
  template: `
    <div class="tile">
      <p>{{ props.rows }} rows and {{ props.columns }} columns</p>
    </div>
  `,
})
export class SampleTileComponent {
  @Input('Props') public props: TileComponentProps<any>;

  constructor() {}
}

Converting an Angular Application to a Pilet

Depending on the kind of Angular application this may be rather straight forward or very difficult. Since we cannot discuss all possible edge cases we will assume the standard scenario. If you need more help then don't hesitate to contact us.

First, you'll need to get rid of the Angular CLI. In most cases adding a Webpack configuration should be sufficient. The Webpack configuration can be similar to the one presented above. In many cases you can use the convenience extend-webpack module.

This is how your webpack.config.js can look like:

const extendWebpack = require('piral-ng/extend-webpack');

module.exports = extendWebpack({
  ngOptions: {
    jitMode: false,
  },
});

For using piral-ng/extend-webpack you must have installed:

  • copy-webpack-plugin
  • @ngtools/webpack
  • to-string-loader
  • html-loader
  • webpack, e.g., via piral-cli-webpack5

You can do that via:

npm i copy-webpack-plugin @ngtools/webpack to-string-loader html-loader piral-cli-webpack5 --save-dev

The available options for piral-ng/extend-webpack are:

  • ngOptions (providing input to the AngularWebpackPlugin class)
  • patterns (providing input to the Webpack copy-webpack-plugin)
  • compilerOptions (providing input to the angularCompilerOptions section of the tsconfig.json)

For AoT (i.e. jitMode: false) to work correctly the compilationMode: 'partial' has to be set. If you use the piral-ng/extend-webpack helper as shown above this will be configured correctly for you.

::: failure: AoT does not work with dependency sharing For AoT to work correctly the Angular sources need to be bundled. This is not the case in scenarios where you installed piral-ng as a plugin in your shell or distribute the Angular packages as shared dependencies from your app shell. :::

If you have set up the build process then you need to make sure that your application has an entry point (index.ts). That entry point has to be a valid pilet entry module. It may look as follows:

import { PiletApi } from '<your-app-shell>';

export function setup(api: PiletApi) {

}

You can remove your main.ts (or similar) containing

platformBrowserDynamic()
  .bootstrapModule(AppModule)
  .catch(err => console.error(err));

as the bootstrapping is done by Piral. Instead, you now need to define your AppModule in the pilet:

import { PiletApi } from '<your-app-shell>';
import { AppModule } from './app/AppModule.ts';

export function setup(api: PiletApi) {
  api.defineNgModule(AppModule);
}

Now you can register the exported components from the AppModule in the various parts. Example:

import { PiletApi } from '<your-app-shell>';
import { AppModule } from './app/AppModule.ts';
import { AppComponent } from './app/AppComponent.ts';

export function setup(api: PiletApi) {
  api.defineNgModule(AppModule);

  api.registerPage('/foo/*', api.fromNg(AppComponent));
}

In the given example we register a single page, however, with all subpages resolving to the same page. Within the page we may use the Angular Router to determine what content to show.

The content may remain pretty much unchanged. Routing should be done either via the Angular Router (internal) or via the React Router (across components) automatically. The thing you'll need to pay attention to is the usage of resources. Since the resource will be available available to the location of the pilet (e.g., if the pilet's main bundle is located at https://yourcdn.com/your-pilet/1.0.0/index.js then resources need to be relative to https://yourcdn.com/your-pilet/1.0.0/).

In general you may also want to convert the templateUrl (and styleUrls) properties of your components (to template and styles). If you set up the bundler as recommended then it would still work though.

::: warning: Prefer not to use templateUrl In many Angular projects you still find templateUrl, which would be transformed to a template by the Angular CLI during build. If you want to achieve the same using, e.g., Webpack, then use a custom loader such as angularjs-template-loader.

The same issue applies to styleUrls, which should be replaced by styles.

If you still need to use templateUrl (or styleUrls) then take a look below at the Webpack config file. :::

Angular Versions

This plugin works with recent versions of Angular (right now 9 - 16). Support for Angular.js (also known as Angular 1) is given via piral-ngjs.

Angular 9

In general, Angular 9 seems to work and is supported.

The basic dependencies look as follows:

{
  "@angular/common": "^9",
  "@angular/compiler": "^9",
  "@angular/core": "^9",
  "@angular/router": "^9",
  "@angular/platform-browser": "^9",
  "@angular/platform-browser-dynamic": "^9",
  "core-js": "^3.15.2",
  "rxjs": "~6.5",
  "zone.js": "~0.9"
}

Angular 10

In general, Angular 10 seems to work and is supported.

The basic dependencies look as follows:

{
  "@angular/common": "^10",
  "@angular/compiler": "^10",
  "@angular/core": "^10",
  "@angular/router": "^10",
  "@angular/platform-browser": "^10",
  "@angular/platform-browser-dynamic": "^10",
  "core-js": "^3.15.2",
  "rxjs": "~6.5",
  "zone.js": "~0.9"
}

Angular 11

In general, Angular 11 seems to work and is supported.

The basic dependencies look as follows:

{
  "@angular/common": "^11",
  "@angular/compiler": "^11",
  "@angular/core": "^11",
  "@angular/router": "^11",
  "@angular/platform-browser": "^11",
  "@angular/platform-browser-dynamic": "^11",
  "core-js": "^3.15.2",
  "rxjs": "~6.5",
  "zone.js": "~0.9"
}

Angular 12

In general, Angular 12 seems to work and is supported.

The basic dependencies look as follows:

{
  "@angular/common": "^12",
  "@angular/compiler": "^12",
  "@angular/core": "^12",
  "@angular/router": "^12",
  "@angular/platform-browser": "^12",
  "@angular/platform-browser-dynamic": "^12",
  "core-js": "^3.15.2",
  "rxjs": "~6.4",
  "zone.js": "0.11.4"
}

Angular 13

In general, Angular 13 seems to work and is supported.

The basic dependencies look as follows:

{
  "@angular/common": "^13",
  "@angular/compiler": "^13",
  "@angular/core": "^13",
  "@angular/router": "^13",
  "@angular/platform-browser": "^13",
  "@angular/platform-browser-dynamic": "^13",
  "core-js": "^3.19.0",
  "rxjs": "^7.4",
  "zone.js": "0.11.4"
}

Besides the usual imports the explicit import of the @angular/compiler package may be necessary.

So include in your app shell as preamble:

import 'core-js/proposals/reflect-metadata';
import '@angular/compiler';

Angular 14

In general, Angular 14 seems to work and is supported.

The basic dependencies look as follows:

{
  "@angular/common": "^14",
  "@angular/compiler": "^14",
  "@angular/core": "^14",
  "@angular/router": "^14",
  "@angular/platform-browser": "^14",
  "@angular/platform-browser-dynamic": "^14",
  "core-js": "^3.19.0",
  "rxjs": "^7.4",
  "zone.js": "~0.12.0"
}

Besides the usual imports the explicit import of the @angular/compiler package may be necessary.

So include in your app shell as preamble:

import 'core-js/proposals/reflect-metadata';
import '@angular/compiler';

Angular 15

In general, Angular 15 seems to work and is supported.

The basic dependencies look as follows:

{
  "@angular/common": "^15",
  "@angular/compiler": "^15",
  "@angular/core": "^15",
  "@angular/router": "^15",
  "@angular/platform-browser": "^15",
  "@angular/platform-browser-dynamic": "^15",
  "core-js": "^3.19.0",
  "rxjs": "^7.4",
  "zone.js": "~0.13.0"
}

Besides the usual imports the explicit import of the @angular/compiler package may be necessary.

So include in your app shell as preamble:

import 'core-js/proposals/reflect-metadata';
import '@angular/compiler';

Angular 16

In general, Angular 16 seems to work and is supported.

The basic dependencies look as follows:

{
  "@angular/common": "^16",
  "@angular/compiler": "^16",
  "@angular/core": "^16",
  "@angular/router": "^16",
  "@angular/platform-browser": "^16",
  "@angular/platform-browser-dynamic": "^16",
  "core-js": "^3.19.0",
  "rxjs": "^7.4",
  "zone.js": "~0.13.0"
}

Besides the usual imports, the explicit import of the @angular/compiler package may be necessary. TypeScript has to be higher than 4.8 (and pre-5.0).

So include in your app shell as preamble:

import 'core-js/proposals/reflect-metadata';
import '@angular/compiler';

Angular 17

In general, Angular 17 seems to work and is supported.

The basic dependencies look as follows:

{
  "@angular/common": "^17",
  "@angular/compiler": "^17",
  "@angular/core": "^17",
  "@angular/router": "^17",
  "@angular/platform-browser": "^17",
  "@angular/platform-browser-dynamic": "^17",
  "core-js": "^3.19.0",
  "rxjs": "^7.4",
  "zone.js": "~0.14.0"
}

Besides the usual imports, the explicit import of the @angular/compiler package may be necessary. TypeScript has to be higher or equal to 5.2 (and less than 5.3).

So include in your app shell as preamble:

import 'core-js/proposals/reflect-metadata';
import '@angular/compiler';

License

Piral is released using the MIT license. For more information see the license file.

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npm i piral-ng

Homepage

piral.io

Weekly Downloads

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Version

1.5.4

License

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  • florianrappl