node package manager
Don’t reinvent the wheel. Reuse code within your team. Create a free org »

karma-typescript

karma-typescript

Npm version Npmjs downloads Travis build status Appveyor build status

Karma ❤️ Typescript

  • Run unit tests written in Typescript with full type checking, seamlessly without extra build steps or scripts.
  • Get remapped test coverage with karma-coverage and Istanbul.
  • Use plain Typescript or a framework: Angular2, AngularJS, React, Sinon, any framework of choice.

Installation

The easiest way is to keep karma-typescript as a devDependency in package.json:

{
  "devDependencies": {
    "karma": "^1.5.0",
    "karma-typescript": "3.0.8"
  }
}

Do this by installing the plugin via npm:

npm install --save-dev karma-typescript

Configuration

Bare minimum configuration can be achieved with the following karma.conf.js file:

module.exports = function(config) {
    config.set({
        frameworks: ["jasmine", "karma-typescript"],
        files: [
            { pattern: "src/**/*.ts" }, // *.tsx for React Jsx
        ],
        preprocessors: {
            "**/*.ts": ["karma-typescript"], // *.tsx for React Jsx
        },
        reporters: ["progress", "karma-typescript"],
        browsers: ["Chrome"]
    });
};

The above example will compile all Typescript files and run the unit tests, producing remapped coverage in ./coverage.

Examples

Cookbook

Frameworks and Integrations

Other examples

Sample applications by users

Transforms:

Example output

Advanced configuration

The plugin has default settings for the compiler, instrumenting files and creating reports etc, which should suit most needs.

These are the default compiler settings:

compilerOptions: {
    emitDecoratorMetadata: true,
    experimentalDecorators: true,
    jsx: "react",
    module: "commonjs",
    sourceMap: true,
    target: "ES5"
},
exclude: ["node_modules"]

The default karma-coverage instrumentation settings:

coverageReporter: {
    instrumenterOptions: {
        istanbul: { noCompact: true }
    }
}

If the defaults aren't enough, the settings can be configured from karma.conf.js:

  • karmaTypescriptConfig.bundlerOptions.addNodeGlobals - Boolean indicating whether the global variables process and Buffer should be added to the bundle.
    Defaults to true.

  • karmaTypescriptConfig.bundlerOptions.constants - An object literal with keys/values which will be available as global variables in the bundle. The keys are expected to be strings and any non-string value will be stringified with JSON.stringify.

    Configuration example:

    constants: {
        __STRING__: JSON.stringify("abc" + 123),
        __BOOLEAN__: true,
        "process.env": {
            "VARIABLE": "value"
        }
    }

    Code example:

    declare var __STRING__: string;
    declare var __BOOLEAN__: boolean;
     
    console.log(__STRING__, __BOOLEAN__, process.env.VARIABLE);
  • karmaTypescriptConfig.bundlerOptions.entrypoints - A RegExp filtering which files loaded by Karma should be executed in a test run, for example only filenames ending with ".spec.ts": /\.spec\.ts$/.
    This setting can be used to make sure the specs have finished setting up the test environment before other code starts requiring modules, which otherwise could lead to subtle bugs caused by race conditions.
    When filtering file paths, beware that Windows uses \ while UNIX-like systems use / as path separator.
    Defaults to all files, /.*/.

  • karmaTypescriptConfig.bundlerOptions.exclude - An array of npm module names that will be excluded from the bundle.

  • karmaTypescriptConfig.bundlerOptions.ignore - An array of npm module names that will be bundled as stubs, ie module.exports = {};.

  • karmaTypescriptConfig.bundlerOptions.noParse - An array of module names that will be bundled without being parsed for dependencies.

  • karmaTypescriptConfig.bundlerOptions.resolve.alias - An object literal where the key is a module name and the value is a path that will be used when resolving the module.
    The key is a regular expression.

  • karmaTypescriptConfig.bundlerOptions.resolve.extensions - An array of file extensions to use, in order, when resolving modules.
    Defaults to [".js", ".json", ".ts", ".tsx"].

  • karmaTypescriptConfig.bundlerOptions.resolve.directories - An array of directories where modules will be recursively looked up.
    Defaults to ["node_modules"].

  • karmaTypescriptConfig.bundlerOptions.sourceMap - A boolean indicating whether source maps should be generated for imported modules in the bundle, useful for debugging in a browser. For more debugging options, please see karmaTypescriptConfig.coverageOptions.instrumentation.
    Defaults to false.

  • karmaTypescriptConfig.bundlerOptions.transforms - An array of functions altering or replacing compiled Typescript code/Javascript code loaded from node_modules before bundling it. For more detailed documentation on transforms, please refer to the Transforms API section in this document.

  • karmaTypescriptConfig.bundlerOptions.validateSyntax - A boolean indicating whether the syntax of the bundled code should be validated. Setting this to false may speed up bundling for large projects with lots of imports from node_modules.
    Defaults to true.

  • karmaTypescriptConfig.compilerDelay - The number of milliseconds the compiler waits before compiling the project on each run.
    For projects with a large number of files it might be necessary to increase this value to make sure the compiler has collected all files before firing.
    Defaults to 250 ms.

  • karmaTypescriptConfig.compilerOptions - This setting will override or add to existing compiler options.
    Valid options are the same as for the compilerOptions section in tsconfig.json, with the exception of outDirand outFile which are ignored since the code is compiled in-memory.

    If noEmitOnError is set to a truthy value, in either tsconfig.json or in karmaTypescriptConfig.compilerOptions, the karma process will exit with ts.ExitStatus.DiagnosticsPresent_OutputsSkipped if any compilation errors occur.

  • karmaTypescriptConfig.coverageOptions.instrumentation - A boolean indicating whether the code should be instrumented, set this property to false to see the original Typescript code when debugging. Please note that setting this property to true requires the Typescript compiler option sourceMap to also be set to true. For more debugging options, please see karmaTypescriptConfig.coverageOptions.sourceMap.
    Defaults to true.

  • karmaTypescriptConfig.coverageOptions.exclude - A RegExp object or an array of RegExp objects for filtering which files should be excluded from coverage instrumentation.
    When filtering file paths, beware that Windows uses \ while UNIX-like systems use / as path separator.
    Defaults to /\.(d|spec|test)\.ts$/i which excludes *.d.ts, *.spec.ts and *.test.ts (case insensitive).

  • karmaTypescriptConfig.coverageOptions.threshold - An object with minimum coverage thresholds. The threshold values can be set on a global level and on a per-file level, with options to exclude files and directories, and override settings on a per-file basis using globbing patterns.
    A positive value will be used as a minimum percentage, for example statements: 50 means that at least 50% of the statements should be covered by a test.
    A negative value will be used as a maximum number of uncovered items, for example lines: 10 means that no more than 10 uncovered lines are allowed.

    threshold: {
        global: {
            statements: 100,
            branches: 100,
            functions: -10,
            lines: 100,
            excludes: [
                "src/foo/**/*.js"
            ]
        },
        file: {
            statements: -10,
            branches: 100,
            functions: 100,
            lines: 100,
            excludes: [
                "src/bar/**/*.js"
            ],
            overrides: {
                "src/file.js": {
                    statements: 90
                }
            }
        }
    }
  • karmaTypescriptConfig.exclude - File string patterns to be excluded by the compiler. This property may be an array or an object for more fine-grained control.

    • Array: The string values will be merged with existing options.
    • Object: The string values will be merged with or replace existing options:
    {
        mode: "merge|replace",
        values: ["foo", "bar"]
    }

    Defaults to ["node_modules"].

  • karmaTypescriptConfig.include - File string patterns to be included by the compiler. This property may be an array or an object for more fine-grained control.

    • Array: The string values will be merged with existing options.
    • Object: The string values will be merged with or replace existing options:
    {
        mode: "merge|replace",
        values: ["foo", "bar"]
    }

    This option is available in Typescript ^2.0.0.

  • karmaTypescriptConfig.remapOptions - Pass options to remap-istanbul.

    • Available options:

      • exclude, a regex for excluding files from remapping
      • warn, a function for handling error messages
  • karmaTypescriptConfig.reports - The types of coverage reports that should be created when running the tests, defaults to an html report in the directory ./coverage. Reporters are configured as "reporttype": destination where the destination can be specified in three ways:

    • A string with a directory path, for example "html": "coverage".
    • An empty string or null. Writes the output to the console, for example "text-summary": "". This is only possible for a subset of the reports available.
    • An object with more fine-grained control over path and filename:
    "cobertura": {
        "directory": "coverage",    // optional, defaults to 'coverage'
        "subdirectory": "cobertura" // optional, defaults to the name of the browser running the tests
        "filename": "coverage.xml", // optional, defaults to the report name
    }
    • Available report types:

      • "clover": destination
      • "cobertura": destination
      • "html": destination
      • "json-summary": destination
      • "json": destination
      • "lcovonly": destination
      • "teamcity": destination (redirects to the console with destination "" or null)
      • "text-lcov": destination (redirects to the console with destination "" or null)
      • "text-summary": destination (redirects to the console with destination "" or null)
      • "text": destination (redirects to the console with destination "" or null)
    • Example of the three destination types:

    karmaTypescriptConfig: {
        reports:
        {
            "cobertura": {
                "directory": "coverage",
                "filename": "coverage.xml",
                "subdirectory": "cobertura"
            },
            "html": "coverage",
            "text-summary": ""
        }
    }
  • karmaTypescriptConfig.transformPath - A function for renaming compiled file extensions to .js.
    Defaults to renaming .ts and .tsx to .js.

  • karmaTypescriptConfig.tsconfig - A path to a tsconfig.json file.
    The default compiler options will be replaced by the options in this file.
    The directory of the tsconfig.json file will be used as the base path for the Typescript compiler, and if karmaTypescriptConfig.tsconfig isn't set, the basePath property of the Karma config will be used as the compiler base path instead.

Example of a full karmaTypescriptConfig configuration:

karmaTypescriptConfig: {
    bundlerOptions: {
        addNodeGlobals: true,
        constants: {
            __PRODUCTION__: false
        },
        entrypoints: /\.spec\.(ts|tsx)$/,
        exclude: ["react/addons"],
        ignore: ["ws"],
        noParse: "jquery",
        resolve: {
            alias: {
                "@angular/upgrade/static$": "../bundles/upgrade-static.umd.js"
            },
            extensions: [".js", ".json"],
            directories: ["node_modules"]
        },
        sourceMap: false,
        transforms: [require("karma-typescript-es6-transform")()],
        validateSyntax: true
    },
    compilerDelay: 500,
    compilerOptions: {
        noImplicitAny: true,
    },
    coverageOptions: {
        instrumentation: true,
        exclude: /\.(d|spec|test)\.ts/i,
        threshold: {
            global: {
                statements: 100,
                branches: 100,
                functions: -10,
                lines: 100,
                excludes: [
                    "src/foo/**/*.js"
                ]
            },
            file: {
                statements: -10,
                branches: 100,
                functions: 100,
                lines: 100,
                excludes: [
                    "src/bar/**/*.js"
                ],
                overrides: {
                    "src/file.js": {
                        statements: 90
                    }
                }
            }
        },
    },
    exclude: ["broken"],
    include: {
        mode: "replace",
        values: ["**/*.ts"]
    },
    remapOptions: {
        warn: function(message){
            console.log(message);
        }
    },
    reports: {
        "cobertura": {
            "directory": "coverage",
            "filename": "cobertura/coverage.xml"
        },
        "html": "coverage",
        "text-summary": ""
    },
    transformPath: function(filepath) {
        return filepath.replace(/\.(ts|tsx)$/, ".js");
    },
    tsconfig: "./tsconfig.json"
}

Automatic bundling

Files executed in the test run are bundled into a main bundle, containing dependencies required from node_modules, and several smaller standalone bundles containing the Typescript files. All these bundles are tied together by commonjs.js, which acts as a hub, loading modules when they are required by other modules.

All files are bundled by being wrapped in a custom CommonJS wrapper, which emulates the Node.js module system by injecting the require function, the module object, the exports object, the __dirname variable and the __filename variable.

For instance, this Typescript sample:

export function exportedFunction(): string {
    return "";
}

Would be compiled to the following JavaScript (assuming the compiler option module is set to commonjs):

function exportedFunction() {
    return "";
}
exports.exportedFunction = exportedFunction;

It would then be wrapped in a CommonJS wrapper by the bundler:

(function(global){
    global.wrappers['/absolutepath/app/src/file.ts']=[function(require,module,exports,__dirname,__filename){
        function exportedFunction() {
            return "";
        }
        exports.exportedFunction = exportedFunction;
    },'src/file.ts',{}];
})(this);

(In this example, the source map and a few other statements have been omitted for brevity and the wrapper has been formatted for readability)

After compilation, a simple static analysis is performed to find "import" and "require" statements in the code and if any dependencies are found, for instance import { Component } from "@angular/core";, it is added to the main bundle file along with its dependencies.

If no import or require statements are found in any Typescript file included in the test run, or the compiler option module is set to another value than commonjs, automatic bundling will not occur.

This means that no Typescript file will be wrapped in the CommonJS wrapper and the reason behind this is the encapsulation that the Node.js module system provides. If no module requests any other module, the test run would contain only isolated islands of code unreachable from the global scope, there would be nothing to execute.

However, this intentional behavior makes it possible to use karma-typescript for projects that use the Typescript module system, or have the compiler option module set to another value than commonjs, or simply put everything on the global scope.

Importing stylesheets and bundling for production

Style files (.css|.less|.sass|.scss) are served as JSON strings to the browser running the tests, allowing styles to be loaded using the Typescript import statement, ie import "./style/app.scss";.

This means styles can be imported in order to let, for instance, webpack load the styles with less-loader or scss-loader etc for bundling later on, without breaking the unit test runner.

Note: JSON required by modules in node_modules will be loaded automatically by the bundler.

The module object

module: {
    exports: {},
    id: "project-relative-path/bar.ts",
    uri: "/absolute-path/project-relative-path/bar.ts"
}

The module.id will be calculated from the value of module.uri, relative to the Karma config basePath value.

Modules exporting an extensible object such as a function or an object literal will also be decorated with a non-enumerable default property if module.exports.default is undefined.

Globals

A full Node.js environment will be provided with global variables and browser shims for builtin core modules:

  • __dirname
  • __filename
  • Buffer
  • global
  • process

Browser shims

The plugin uses browser-resolve from the browserify tool chain to load the source code from node_modules.

Mocking

Imported modules, local or npm packages, can be mocked using karma-typescript-mock. This feature is available in karma-typescript@^3.0.5.

Transforms API

The bundler has a public API which lets plugins alter or completely replace code before adding it to the bundle. For example, a plugin could compile ES2015 JavaScript code to to ES5 syntax, making it possible to import an npm module written in ES2015 syntax from a Typescript module directly.

The interface between the bundler and the plugins is a plain array of functions, specified in the configuration property karmaTypescriptConfig.bundlerOptions.transforms, where each function is considered a transforming plugin.

The plugin functions in the transforms array are asynchronous and adhere to the Node.js callback convention where the first argument of the callback function is an Error object or undefined and the following parameters contains the result. However, although each function is asynchronous, all functions will be called synchronously one by one in the order they were added to the array, and each function will be called with the result of the previous function, enabling transforms plugin chaining.

Transforms will be executed at two points in the bundling process: right after compilation of the project Typescript files and when resolving import and require statements. This means each transforming function will be called for both Typescript files and JavaScript files from node_modules, making each plugin implementation responsible for validating the context before performing any logic, for example by checking the file name, module name or the existence of an ast object etc.

Each transforming function will be executed before resolving dependencies, which means paths in import or require statements or anywhere in the code can be rewritten before bundling, to fit the Karma execution environment.

Example of a simple inline transforming function replacing the contents of a .css file, mimicking the behavior of Css Modules:

karmaTypescriptConfig: {
    bundlerOptions: {
        transforms: [
            function(context, callback) {
                if(context.module === "./main.css") {
                    context.source = "module.exports = { color: red };";
                    return callback(undefined, true);
                }
                return callback(undefined, false);
            }
        ]
    }
}

It is also possible to change the transpiled Typescript (ie the plain JavaScript code) code by using the third callback parameter to tell the Transforms API not to recompile the transpiled code:

karmaTypescriptConfig: {
    bundlerOptions: {
        transforms: [
            function(context, callback) {
                if(context.ts) {
                    context.ts.transpiled = "\n/* istanbul ignore next */\n" + context.ts.transpiled;
                    return callback(undefined, true, false);
                }
                return callback(undefined, false);
            }
        ]
    }
}

Context

The context object, TransformContext, is defined here.

Callback

The callback function has three arguments:

  1. An Error object or undefined
  2. A boolean indicating whether the value of context.source has changed or not.
  3. A boolean indicating whether the transformed source should be recompiled. Defaults to true and can be omitted.

Requirements

Typescript ^1.6.2 is required.

Versions 1.6.2 - 1.7.5 work but aren't as heavily tested as versions 1.8.10 and up.

Troubleshooting

Error: Can not load "karma-typescript", it is not registered!

Users have reported success by simply deleting the node_modules folder and then running npm install again.

Error: Cannot find module 'buffer/' from '.'

Note: this error has been fixed in karma-typescript@^3.0.0`.

This error seems to hit mostly users of with older versions of npm, where all dependencies don't get pulled in automatically by npm.

There's a workaround reported by users, which is simply adding the missing dependencies explicitly to package.json:

  • npm install --save-dev browser-resolve
  • npm install --save-dev buffer
  • npm install --save-dev process

Other workarounds are running npm install twice or, if possible, upgrading to a newer version of npm.

These are the environments reported failing/working:

Npm Node.js OS Works
2.5.18 4.4.7 Unknown No
2.14.7 4.2.1 Ubuntu 14.04 No
2.14.12 4.2.6 OSX 10.11.3 No
2.15.9 4.5.0 OSX 10.11.6 No
2.15.9 4.6.0 OSX 10.12.3 No
2.15.11 4.6.2 Ubuntu 14.04 No
2.15.11 4.7.0 Ubuntu 14.04 Yes
3.5.3 4.2.1 Windows 10 Yes
3.8.6 6.10.0 Windows Server 2012 R2 Yes
3.10.3 6.4.0 OSX 10.11.6 Yes
3.10.9 6.9.2 Ubuntu 14.04 Yes
4.0.5 6.4.0 OSX 10.11.6 Yes
4.1.2 7.5.0 OSX 10.12.2 No
4.1.2 7.7.3 Ubuntu 14.04 Yes

Licensing

This software is licensed with the MIT license.

© 2016-2017 Erik Barke, Monounity