integreat-transporter-mongodb

1.3.0 • Public • Published

MongoDB support for Integreat

Transporter that lets Integreat use a MongoDB database as service.

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Getting started

Prerequisits

Requires at least node v18, Integreat v1.0, and MongoDB 5.0.

Installing and using

Install from npm:

npm install integreat-transporter-mongodb

Example of use:

import Integreat from 'integreat'
import mongodb from 'integreat-transporter-mongodb'
import defs from './config'

const resources = {
  // ... you'll probably want to include other resources as well
  transporters: { mongodb },
}
const great = Integreat.create(defs, resources)

// ... and then dispatch actions as usual

The data returns from GET actions will be the retrieved documents, while for SET, UPDATE, and DELETE actions the data will be result stats in the form of { modifiedCount: 1, insertedCount: 2, deletedCount: 0 }.

UPDATE actions may update a given array of items or use the given data item to update all documents matched by a given query. In the first case, the action will respond with a notfound error if one or more of the provided data items are not already in the database. In the second case, the action will respond with noaction if no documents are matched by the query.

GET actions will also return a totalCount in the params object of the response, with the total number of documents matching the query. This is useful for paged queries.

After including the mongodb transporter in your resources object, you still need to configure your service to use it.

Example service configuration:

{
  id: 'store',
  transporter: 'mongodb',
  auth: 'mongoAuth', // See below for documentation of authentication
  options: {
    uri: 'mongodb://mymongo.com',
  }
  endpoints: [
    { options: { db: 'store', collection: 'documents' } }
  ]
}

The uri is used as the uri to the database.

MongoDB's _id field

MongoDB uses an _id field as the primary key for documents. By default, we user let MongoDB generate this field and never touch it, but if you set idIsUnique: true in the option, signaling that the id of the data items you'll send to the mongodb transporter will always be unique, we'll map the id to _id and back again.

One of the advantages of this is that, in addition to not have an extra id field, MongoDB will always create an index for _id, so this may speed up operations on the collection without any extra setup.

Serializing and normalizing

Some characters are not allowed in MongoDB keys, so we have to escape them when setting data to MongoDB. Leading $ is escape as \$, and . is escaped as \_. Consequently, \ is mapped to \\ as well. This is done automatically by the transporter, and reverted when values are fetched, but you will see it if you query data directly from the database.

Integreat accepts using an empty string '' as a key in an object (as does JavaScript and JSON), but MongoDB does not. We therefore replace empty strings keys with the string '**empty**' when storing data in MongoDB, and normalizes it back when fetching data.

Also, we remove all properties with a undefined value, to not fill the database with empty values. This also means that existing values are not overwritten with undefined when updating documents. This is usually what you want when updating data from Integreat, and it's easy to end up with unintended undefined values from mutation pipelines, but if you actually want to set undefined values, you can do so by setting the keepUndefined option to true. Note that undefined values in an array are always preserved, e.g. ['ent1', undefined, 'ent3']. Also, note that MongoDB will turn undefined into null.

Querying

An endpoint may have a query property, which should be an array of path objects describing the query object used with MongoDB's find() method.

Here's an example:

{
  ...
  endpoints: [
    {
      id: 'getDrafts',
      options: {
        db: 'store',
        collection: 'documents',
        query: [
          { path: 'type', param: 'type' },
          { path: 'meta.status', value: 'draft' }
          { path: 'meta.views', op: 'gt', value: 1000 }
        ],
        allowDiskUse: true
      }
    }
  ]
}

The path property describes what property to set, and the property is set to the value of value or to the value of the request parameter in param. The default operand is eq, but you may also use gt, gte, lt, lte, or in.

There are also two special operands: isset and notset. They will match when a field is set or not.

To do a match on objects in an array, use the match operand. This will match any document with an array at path that contains an object with the properties specified in value or param. This uses MongoDB's $elemMatch operator under the hood.

To do a text search in the text index set up for th collection, use the search operand and set value to search string or param to the parameter that holds the search string. See MongoDB docs for more on setting up a text index.

The query object will look like this, for a request for items of type entry:

{
  type: 'entry',
  'meta.status': 'draft',
  'meta.views': { $gt: 1000 }
}

To specify or logic, you put several queries in an array. To have and logic within an or array, you again use an array.

To query for type and a meta.status of draft or published:

// ...
query: [
  { path: 'type', param: 'type' },
  [
    // or
    { path: 'meta.status', value: 'draft' },
    { path: 'meta.status', value: 'published' },
  ],
]

To query for type and a meta.status of draft or published, with draft having an and logic with meta.author.role:

// ...
query: [
  { path: 'type', param: 'type' },
  [
    // or
    [
      // and
      { path: 'meta.status', value: 'draft' },
      { path: 'meta.author.role', value: 'author' },
    ],
    { path: 'meta.status', value: 'published' },
  ],
]

When no query is specified and the action has an id param, the following query will be used by default (the value of id is 'ent1' in this example):

{
  id: 'ent1',
}

Aggregation

Aggregation is supported by specifying a pipeline on the aggregation property on the options object. If a query or a sort order is specified, they are put first in the aggregation pipeline, query first, then sorting.

Example of an aggregation pipeline:

{
  ...
  endpoints: [
    {
      id: 'getNewestVersion',
      options: {
        db: 'store',
        collection: 'documents',
        aggregation: [
          { type: 'sort', sortBy: { updatedAt: -1 } },
          {
            type: 'group',
            groupBy: ['account', 'id'],
            values: { updatedAt: 'first', status: 'first' },
          },
          {
            type: 'query',
            query: [
              { path: 'updatedAt', op: 'gt', param: 'updatedAfter' },
            ],
          },
        ]
      }
    }
  ]
}

Pagination

When the pageSize param is set in a request, it is taken as the max number of documents to return in the response. When nothing else is specified, the first page of documents is returned, and the paging.next prop on the response will hold a params object that may be used to get the next page.

There are two types of pagination; pageId or pageOffset. The first one is used by default, and returns an id for the next page in the dataset. All details around this id is internal to the transporter and may change without being considered a breaking change. Just treat it as an id and you'll be find.

The pageOffset approach kicks in when a pageOffset param is specified on the action, so to use this approach, you need to set pageOffset: 0 for the first page. If the pageSize is e.g. 100, the next pageOffset will be 100, etc.

Pagination works for both aggregations and simple queries.

Authentication

We recommend using Integreat's built in authentication mechanism to authenticate with MongoDB. To do this, set the id of an auth object on the auth prop of the service definition -- in the example above this is set to mongoAuth. Then define an auth object like this:

{
  id: 'mongoAuth',
  authenticator: 'options',
  options: {
    key: '<mongo username>',
    secret: '<mongo password>',
  }
}

The options authenticator will simply pass on the options object to Integreat, which will again pass it on to the MongoDB transport -- which will know how to use this to authenticate with MongoDB.

Note: Including credential in the connection uri, is a fairly common practice with MongoDB. When using this approach, tell Integreat that the service is authenticated by setting auth: true on the service definition. However, we not recommend this approach, as the username and password is then included in the definition file and this makes the chance of it being e.g. commited to a git repo, much higher.

Heartbeat

Experimental: By setting a number on the throwAfterFailedHeartbeatCount option, the transporter will throw after the number of heartbeat failures you specify. The counter will reset for every sucessful heartbeat, so if throwAfterFailedHeartbeatCount is 3, it will throw when after three heartbeat failures in a row.

The point of this is to allow the server to restart after loosing contact with MongoDB.

Running the tests

The tests can be run with npm test.

Contributing

Please read CONTRIBUTING for details on our code of conduct, and the process for submitting pull requests.

License

This project is licensed under the ISC License - see the LICENSE file for details.

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