graphi

6.0.0 • Public • Published

graphi

hapi GraphQL server plugin with Joi scalars

Build Status

Options

  • graphqlPath - HTTP path to serve graphql requests. Default is /graphql
  • graphiqlPath - HTTP path to serve the GraphiQL UI. Set to '' or false to disable. Default is /graphiql
  • schema - graphql schema either as a string or as a GraphQLSchema instance
  • resolvers - query and mutation functions mapped to their respective keys. Resolvers should return a promise when performing asynchronous operations.
  • authStrategy - (optional) Authentication strategy to apply to /graphql route. Default is false.
  • graphiAuthStrategy - (optional) Authentication strategy to apply to /graphiql route. Default is false.

API

The following decorations are made to the hapi server to make it easier to use a single graphi plugin with multiple other plugins depending on it.

  • server.registerSchema({ schema, resolvers }) - similar to the original registration options for the plugin, but this will merge the schema with any prior schema that is already registered with the server. This is useful for combining multiple graphql schemas/resolvers together into a single server.
  • server.makeExecutableSchema({ schema, resolvers, preResolve }) - combine resolvers with the schema definition into a GraphQLSchema.

The follow properties are exported directly when you require('graphi')

  • graphql - exported Graphql module that graphi uses
  • makeExecutableSchema({ schema, resolvers, preResolve }) - combine resolvers with the schema definition into a GraphQLSchema.

Usage

const schema = `
  type Person {
    firstname: String! @JoiString(min 4)
    lastname: String!
  }
 
  type Query {
    person(firstname: String!): Person!
  }
`;
 
const getPerson = function (args, request) {
  return { firstname: 'billy', lastname: 'jean' };
};
 
const resolvers = {
  person: getPerson
};
 
const server = Hapi.server();
await server.register({ plugin: Graphi, options: { schema, resolvers } });

With GraphQLSchema Instance

const schema = new GraphQLSchema({
  query: new GraphQLObjectType({
    name: 'RootQueryType',
    fields: {
      person: {
        type: GraphQLString,
        args: {
          firstname: { type: new Scalars.JoiString({ min: [2, 'utf8'], max: 10 }) }
        },
        resolve: (root, { firstname }, request) => {
          return firstname;
        }
      }
    }
  })
});
 
const server = Hapi.server();
await server.register({ plugin: Graphi, options: { schema } });

With hapi routes

You can also define resolvers as hapi routes. As a result, each resolver is able to benefit from route caching, custom auth strategies, and all of the other powerful hapi routing features. Each route should either use the custom method 'graphql' or it should add a tag named 'graphql' and the path should be the key name for the resolver prefixed with /. You can also mix and match existing resolvers with routes.

const schema = `
  type Person {
    firstname: String!
    lastname: String!
  }
 
  type Query {
    person(firstname: String!): Person!
  }
`;
 
 
const server = Hapi.server();
server.route({
  method: 'graphql',
  path: '/person',
  handler: (request, h) => {
    // request.payload contains any arguments sent to the query
    return { firstname: 'billy', lastname: 'jean' };
  }
});
 
await server.register({ plugin: Graphi, options: { schema } });

This enables existing RESTful APIs to be easily converted over to GraphQL resolvers:

server.route({
  method: 'POST',
  path: '/person',
  config: {
    tags: ['graphql'],
    handler: (request, h) => {
      // request.payload contains any arguments sent to the query
      return { firstname: 'billy', lastname: 'jean' };
    }
  }
});

Joi scalar support

Any schema that is expressed with JoiType directives is converted to valid scalars. As a result, using graphi you are able to create more expressive GraphQL schema definitions. For example, if you want to allow the creation of a well formed user the schema can look like the following, resulting in validated input fields before the fields are passed to any resolvers.

type Mutation {
  createUser(name: String @JoiString(min 2), email: String @JoiString(email: true, max: 128))
}

Additionally, you can also use the Joi scalars to perform extra preprosessing or postprocessing on you data. For example, the following schema will result in firstname being uppercased on the response.

type Person {
  firstname: String @JoiString(uppercase: true)
}

install

npm i graphi

Downloadsweekly downloads

47

version

6.0.0

license

MPL-2.0

homepage

github.com

repository

Gitgithub

last publish

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