git-stats

A GitHub-like contributions calendar, but locally, with all your git commits.

$ git-stats

A GitHub-like contributions calendar, but locally, with all your git commits.

I'd be curious to see your calendar with all your commits. Ping me on Twitter (@IonicaBizau). :smile: Until then, here's my calendar:

$ npm install -g git-stats

Would you like to catch and automatically store the commits when you do git commit? If so, try one of the following solutions.

The way I recommend to track your git commits is to use git hooks. Run the following command to initialize the post-commit git hook.

# Using curl 
curl -s https://raw.githubusercontent.com/IonicaBizau/git-stats/master/scripts/init-git-post-commit | bash
 
# ...or wget 
wget -qO- https://raw.githubusercontent.com/IonicaBizau/git-stats/master/scripts/init-git-post-commit | bash

Then, you have to run git init into your existing git repositories from your local machine (that's because the post-commit should be updated). This step will not be needed after cloning a repository (the git hooks will be added automatically from ~/.git-templates).

One of the solutions is becoming a mad scientist, overriding the git command with a function. However, this may not work for you if you're using zsh.

Add the following lines in your ~/.bashrc (or ~/.bash_profile on OS X) file:

# Override the Git command 
git() {
  cmd=$1
  shift
  extra=""
 
  quoted_args=""
  whitespace="[[:space:]]"
  for i in "$@"
  do
      quoted_args="$quoted_args \"$i\""
  done
 
  cmdToRun="`which git` "$cmd" $quoted_args"
  cmdToRun=`echo $cmdToRun | sed -e 's/^ *//' -e 's/ *$//'`
  bash -c "$cmdToRun"
  if [ $? -eq 0 ]; then
    # Commit stats 
    if [ "$cmd" == "commit" ]; then
      commit_hash=`git rev-parse HEAD`
      repo_url=`git config --get remote.origin.url`
      commit_date=`git log -1 --format=%cd`
      commit_data="\"\"date\"\"$commit_date\"\"url\"\"$repo_url\"\"hash\"\"$commit_hash\" }\""
      git-stats --record "$commit_data"
    fi
  fi
}
$ git-stats --help
git-stats --help
A GitHub-like contributions calendar, but locally, with all your git commits.
 
usage: git-stats [start] [end] [options] [data]
 
start:                    Optional start date
end:                      Optional end date
 
options:
  -v                      Displays version information.
  -h --help               Displays this help.
  --no-ansi               Doesn't use ANSI colors in the squares.
  --record <data>         Records a new commit. Don't use this unless you are
                          a mad scientist. If you are a developer, just use this
                          option as part of the module.
  --light                 Enable the light theme.
 
examples:
   git-stats # Displays your commit calendar 
   git-stats -v
   git-stats -h
   git-stats --light # Light mode 
   git-stats '1 January 2012' # All the commits from 1 January 2012, to now 
   git-stats '1 January 2012' '31 December 2012' # All the commits from 2012 
 
Your commit history is kept in the .git-stats, in your $HOME directory (~/)
 
Documentation can be found at https://github.com/IonicaBizau/git-stats

If you override the git command with a function, then your commits will be automatically recorded.

I know it's not nice to start your git commit calendar from scratch. That's why I created a git-stats-importer that imports or deletes the commits from a repository.

Check it out here: https://github.com/IonicaBizau/git-stats-importer

The usage is simple:

# Install the importer tool 
$ npm install -g git-stats-importer
 
# Go to the repository you want to import 
cd path/to/my-repository
 
# Import the commits 
$ git-stats-importer
 
# ...or delete them if that's a dummy repository 
$ git-stats-importer --delete

Yes, you read correctly! That's also possible. I built a tool for that too!

# Download the repository downloader 
$ git clone https://github.com/IonicaBizau/repository-downloader.git
 
# Go to repository downloader 
cd repository-downloader
 
# Install the dependencies 
$ npm install
 
# Start downloading and importing 
$ ./start

There is a solution for that, too! :smile: It's called ghcal.

# Install ghcal 
$ npm install -g ghcal
 
# Checkout my contributions 
$ ghcal ionicabizau

For more detailed documentation, check out the repository: https://github.com/IonicaBizau/ghcal.

Documentation

If you want to use this as a module, that is possible. See the content below.

Records a new commit.

  • Object data: The commit data containing:

  • date (String|Date): The date object or a string in a format that can be parsed.

  • url (String): The repository remote url.

  • hash (String): The commit hash.

  • Function callback: The callback function.

  • GitStats The GitStats object.

Gets the git stats.

  • Function callback: The callback function.
  • GitStats The GitStats object.

Saves the provided stats.

  • Object stats: The stats to be saved.
  • Function callback: The callback function.
  • GitStats The GitStats object.

Iterate through the days, calling the callback function on each day.

  • Object data: An object containing the following fields:

  • start (Moment): A Moment date object representing the start date (default: an year ago).

  • end (Moment): A Moment date object representing the end date (default: now).

  • format (String): The format of the date (default: "MMM D, YYYY").

  • Function callback: The callback function called with the current day formatted (type: string) and the Moment date object.

  • GitStats The GitStats object.

Creates an object with the stats on the provided period (default: last year).

  • Object data: The object passed to the iterateDays method.
  • Function callback: The callback function.
  • GitStats The GitStats object.

Creates the calendar data for the provided period (default: last year).

  • Object data: The object passed to the graph method.
  • Function callback: The callback function.
  • GitStats The GitStats object.

Creates the ANSI contributions calendar.

  • Object data: The object passed to the calendar method.
  • Function callback: The callback function.
  • GitStats The GitStats object.
  1. File an issue in the repository, using the bug tracker, describing the contribution you'd like to make. This will help us to get you started on the right foot.
  2. Fork the project in your account and create a new branch: your-great-feature.
  3. Commit your changes in that branch.
  4. Open a pull request, and reference the initial issue in the pull request message.

See the LICENSE file.