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deepmerge

2.2.1 • Public • Published

deepmerge

Merges the enumerable attributes of two or more objects deeply.

UMD bundle is 567B minified+gzipped

Migration from 1.x to 2.0.0

Check out the changes from version 1.x to 2.0.0

For the legacy array element-merging algorithm, see the arrayMerge option below.

Webpack bug

If you have require('deepmerge') (as opposed to import merge from 'deepmerge') anywhere in your codebase, Webpack 3 and 4 have a bug that breaks bundling.

If you see Error: merge is not a function, add this alias to your Webpack config:

alias: {
    deepmerge$: path.resolve(__dirname, 'node_modules/deepmerge/dist/umd.js'),
}

Getting Started

Example Usage

var x = {
    foo: { bar: 3 },
    array: [{
        does: 'work',
        too: [ 1, 2, 3 ]
    }]
}
 
var y = {
    foo: { baz: 4 },
    quux: 5,
    array: [{
        does: 'work',
        too: [ 4, 5, 6 ]
    }, {
        really: 'yes'
    }]
}
 
var expected = {
    foo: {
        bar: 3,
        baz: 4
    },
    array: [{
        does: 'work',
        too: [ 1, 2, 3 ]
    }, {
        does: 'work',
        too: [ 4, 5, 6 ]
    }, {
        really: 'yes'
    }],
    quux: 5
}
 
merge(x, y) // => expected

Installation

With npm do:

npm install deepmerge

deepmerge can be used directly in the browser without the use of package managers/bundlers as well: UMD version from unpkg.com.

Includes

CommonJS:

var merge = require('deepmerge')

ES Modules:

import merge from 'deepmerge'

API

merge(x, y, [options])

Merge two objects x and y deeply, returning a new merged object with the elements from both x and y.

If an element at the same key is present for both x and y, the value from y will appear in the result.

Merging creates a new object, so that neither x or y is modified.

Note: By default, arrays are merged by concatenating them.

merge.all(arrayOfObjects, [options])

Merges any number of objects into a single result object.

var x = { foo: { bar: 3 } }
var y = { foo: { baz: 4 } }
var z = { bar: 'yay!' }
 
var expected = { foo: { bar: 3, baz: 4 }, bar: 'yay!' }
 
merge.all([x, y, z]) // => expected

Options

arrayMerge

There are multiple ways to merge two arrays, below are a few examples but you can also create your own custom function.

Overwrite Array

Overwrites the existing array values completely rather than concatenating them

const overwriteMerge = (destinationArray, sourceArray, options) => sourceArray
 
merge(
    [1, 2, 3],
    [3, 2, 1],
    { arrayMerge: overwriteMerge }
) // => [3, 2, 1]

Combine Array

Combine arrays, such as overwriting existing defaults while also adding/keeping values that are different names

To use the legacy (pre-version-2.0.0) array merging algorithm, use the following:

const emptyTarget = value => Array.isArray(value) ? [] : {}
const clone = (value, options) => merge(emptyTarget(value), value, options)
 
function combineMerge(target, source, options) {
    const destination = target.slice()
 
    source.forEach(function(e, i) {
        if (typeof destination[i] === 'undefined') {
            const cloneRequested = options.clone !== false
            const shouldClone = cloneRequested && options.isMergeableObject(e)
            destination[i] = shouldClone ? clone(e, options) : e
        } else if (options.isMergeableObject(e)) {
            destination[i] = merge(target[i], e, options)
        } else if (target.indexOf(e) === -1) {
            destination.push(e)
        }
    })
    return destination
}
 
merge(
    [{ a: true }],
    [{ b: true }, 'ah yup'],
    { arrayMerge: combineMerge }
) // => [{ a: true, b: true }, 'ah yup']

isMergeableObject

By default, deepmerge clones every property from almost every kind of object.

You may not want this, if your objects are of special types, and you want to copy the whole object instead of just copying its properties.

You can accomplish this by passing in a function for the isMergeableObject option.

If you only want to clone properties of plain objects, and ignore all "special" kinds of instantiated objects, you probably want to drop in is-plain-object.

const isPlainObject = require('is-plain-object')
 
function SuperSpecial() {
    this.special = 'oh yeah man totally'
}
 
const instantiatedSpecialObject = new SuperSpecial()
 
const target = {
    someProperty: {
        cool: 'oh for sure'
    }
}
 
const source = {
    someProperty: instantiatedSpecialObject
}
 
const defaultOutput = merge(target, source)
 
defaultOutput.someProperty.cool // => 'oh for sure'
defaultOutput.someProperty.special // => 'oh yeah man totally'
defaultOutput.someProperty instanceof SuperSpecial // => false
 
const customMergeOutput = merge(target, source, {
    isMergeableObject: isPlainObject
})
 
customMergeOutput.someProperty.cool // => undefined
customMergeOutput.someProperty.special // => 'oh yeah man totally'
customMergeOutput.someProperty instanceof SuperSpecial // => true

clone

Deprecated.

Defaults to true.

If clone is false then child objects will be copied directly instead of being cloned. This was the default behavior before version 2.x.

Testing

With npm do:

npm test

License

MIT

install

npm i deepmerge

Downloadsweekly downloads

1,481,867

version

2.2.1

license

MIT

homepage

github.com

repository

Gitgithub

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