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conectric-usb-gateway

1.0.8 • Public • Published

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Conectric USB Gateway Module for Node.js

Conectric USB Router

Introduction

This module is Conectric's Node.js SDK that allows you to communicate with our wireless mesh network sensors. We aim to get you up and running quickly, so that you can rapidly build applications or visualizations that use near real time temperature, humidity, motion detection and switch state data. You can also use this module to communicate with devices that use the RS-485 protocol.

Our introductory video provides a quick overview of the product.

Introductory Video

We also published an overview on Medium.

You can find details of the mesh network protocol site on GitHub.

Hardware Requirements

In order to use this module, you will require:

  • A computer which has a spare USB 2.0 port.
  • The ability to install Node.js 8.9.4 or higher. We recommend use of the long term stable releases.
  • A USB router from Conectric.
  • One or more wireless sensors from Conectric.

USB Router

The USB router is a USB 2.0 stick that can be purchased from Conectric. It acts as the interface between the mesh network that the sensors are connected to, and this Node module.

Sensors

In order to receive data via the USB router through this module, you will need at least one Conectric wireless sensor.

The following sensor types are supported at this time:

  • Motion (PIR) sensor.
  • Switch (door switch) sensor.
  • Combined temperature / humidity sensor.
  • Wireless RS-485 module.

Linux Dependencies

If you are running Linux (e.g. Ubuntu) you will need to install the following before installing this module:

sudo apt install libusb-dev libusb libudev-dev libudev build-essential

You may need to use apt-get in place of apt, depending on your setup. You may also need to request specific versions for some e.g. on Raspbian Stretch for Raspberry Pi:

sudo apt-get install libusb-dev libusb-1.0-0-dev libudev-dev build-essential

Node.js Version

We recommend that you use Node.js 8.9.4, or any subsequent long term stable (LTS) release.

Quick Start

To get going and receive your first sensor data quickly, use one of our bundled examples:

mkdir iotgateway
cd iotgateway
npm init

Accept all the defaults, except "entry point", use server.js for that. Then:

npm install --save conectric-usb-gateway
cp node_modules/conectric-usb-gateway/examples/logmessages/server.js .
npm start

Then insert batteries into your Conectric sensors, plug your Conectric USB router into a USB port on your computer and watch sensor data appear in your console.log output.

Example expected output (when a temperature / humidity sensor is present):

$ npm start
 
> conectric-gateway-example-logmessages@1.0.0 start /Users/conectric/projects/myiotgateway
> node server.js
 
Found router device at /dev/tty.usbserial-DB00VL3E.
Gateway opened.
Switched gateway to dump payload mode.
USB router mac address is 00124b000513da40.
USB router Contiki version: 3.x
USB router Conectric version: 1.0.2
{ type'tempHumidity',
  payload: 
   { battery: 3,
     temperature: 23.05,
     temperatureUnit: 'C',
     humidity: 41.65 },
  timestamp: 1518761945243,
  sensorId: 'a946',
  sequenceNumber: 37 }

server.js contains:

const gateway = require('conectric-usb-gateway');
 
gateway.runGateway({
  onSensorMessage: (sensorMessage) => {
    console.log(sensorMessage);
  }
});

Incoming Message Types

This module works by decoding sensor broadcast messages from the mesh network, then translating them into JSON objects which are then supplied to your callback function where your business logic happens.

Depending on how you configure this module (see Configuration Options for details), and on which sensors you have available, you can expect to see the following types of message delivered to your callback.

Each message has a set of common keys. Others only appear when certain gateway configuration values are set in your code's call to runGateway:

  • numHops: (present if sendHopData option is set to true). Value will be a number indicating the number of network hops that the message took.
  • maxHops: (present if sendHopData option is set to true). Value will be a number indicating the maximum number of allowed network hops (0 = unlimited).
  • payload: (present unless sendDecodedPayload option is set to false). Value will be an object whose schema varies depending on the value of type, see the next few sections for examples of each type of payload.
  • timestamp: (always present) UNIX timestamp for when the gateway received the message from the mesh network.
  • rawData: (present if sendRawData option is set to true). Value will be the raw hex data for the message as received from the mesh network. This is mostly useful for debugging this module, end users should use values from payload.
  • sensorId: (always present) The last 4 characters of the mesh network MAC address of the sensor that send the message.
  • sequenceNumber: (always present) The message sequence number -- do not rely on these to arrive in order, or be unique, as the sequence number will reset over time or if the sensor's battery is removed and replaced. You should not use a combination of sequenceNumber and sensorId as a unique message key.
  • type: (always present) indicates which type of message was received, values are:
    • boot
    • motion
    • rs485Config
    • rs485Request
    • rs485Response
    • switch
    • tempHumidity
    • text

boot

This message is sent when a sensor initially boots up (battery is inserted), or is reset for some reason. The message JSON looks like:

{
  "type": "boot",
  "payload": {
    "battery": 2.9,
    "resetCause": "powerOn"
  },
  "timestamp": 1518746384048,
  "sensorId": "a946",
  "sequenceNumber": 0
}

The payload for the boot message consists of the following keys:

  • battery: The sensor's battery level in volts.
  • resetCause: Indicates the reason that the sensor booted, possible values are:
    • powerOn: The battery was inserted into the sensor.
    • externalReset: The sensor's reset button was pressed.
    • watchdogReset: The sensor's firmware detected a need to reboot the sensor.
    • unknown: Catch all value, which should never appear.

If your application does not need to see these messages, they can be suppressed using the sendBootMessages configuration option. See the Configuration Options for details.

motion

This message is sent when a motion detector / PIR sensor detects motion. The message JSON looks like:

{ 
  "type": "motion",
  "payload": { 
    "battery": 2.8, 
    "motion": true 
  },
  "timestamp": 1518757698977,
  "sensorId": "02A2",
  "sequenceNumber": 12 
}

The payload for the motion message consists of the following keys:

  • battery: The sensor's battery level in volts.
  • motion: Will always be true as the sensor only fires when motion is detected.

rs485Response

This message is sent from a wireless RS-485 module in reponse to a request sent from the USB router to the RS-485 module. See RS-485 Messaging section of this document for details of how to send a request.

The message JSON looks like:

{ 
  "type": "rs485Response",
  "payload": { 
    "battery": 3.1, 
    "rs485": "0110000062b9fe" 
  },
  "timestamp": 1527654307,
  "sensorId": "dfbc",
  "sequenceNumber": 1
}

The payload for the rs485Response message consists of the following keys:

  • battery: The sensor's battery level in volts.
  • rs485: Data coming back from the RS-485 device in response to data sent in an rs485Request message (See RS-485 Messaging section of this document). The format and encoding of this data will depend on your RS-485 device.

switch

This messsage is sent when a switch / door switch sensor changes state (switch / door opens or closes). The message JSON looks like:

{ 
  "type": "switch",
  "payload": { 
    "battery": 3, 
    "switch": false 
  },
  "timestamp": 1518757698977,
  "sensorId": "0219",
  "sequenceNumber": 0 
}

The payload for the switch message consists of the following keys:

  • battery: The sensor's battery level in volts.
  • switch: By default, the value will be false when the two switch magnets are close to each other or true when the two switch magnets are far apart from each other.

The optional configuration key switchOpenValue can be used in your call to runGateway. It can be set to change the value of switch, so that it becomes false when the magnets are far apart from each other and true when they are close together. To do this, set switchOpenValue to false in your call to runGateway:

gateway.runGateway({
  onSensorData: (sensorData) => {
    console.log(sensorData);
  },
  switchOpenValue: false  // switch messages report true when magnets close to each other
})

tempHumidity

This message is sent when a temperature and humidity sensor broadcasts the temperature and humidity values that it has observed. The message JSON looks like:

{
  "type": "tempHumidity",
  "payload": {
    "battery": 3,
    "temperature": 73.33,
    "temperatureUnit": "F",
    "humidity": 60.65
  },
  "timestamp": 1518746385455,
  "sensorId": "a946",
  "sequenceNumber": 1
}

The payload for the tempHumidity message consists of the following keys:

  • battery: The sensor's battery level in volts.
  • temperature: The temperature reading, to a maximum of two decimal places.
  • temperatureUnit: Will be set to "C" if the value of temperature is in degrees Celcius (default), or "F" if the value of temperature is in degrees Fahrenheit.
  • humidity: The percentage relative humidity reading, to a maximum of two decimal places.

By default, values for temperature will be in degrees Celcius. To receive values in degrees Fahrenheit, set the configuration option useFahrenheightTemps to true (see Configuration Options section).

text

This message is received from another USB router or other network device. The message JSON looks like:

{ 
  "type": "text",
  "payload": { 
    "battery": 3.2, 
    "text": "Hello World this is a test." 
  },
  "timestamp": 1524198664,
  "sensorId": "da40",
  "sequenceNumber": 10 
}

The payload for the text message consists of the following keys:

  • battery: The sensor's battery level in volts.
  • text: The free text message string that was sent (up to 250 characters).

By default, text will be decoded from the hex representation used on the network. To receive raw hex data instead, set the configuration option decodeTextMessages to false (see Configuration Options section).

Callback Functions

This module deals with decoding the sensor broadcast messages from the mesh network, and handles all of the heavy lifting associated with that for you. When you start the gateway module by invoking its runGateway method, you must pass it a configuration object containing a callback function that will be called every time a message is received from the mesh network. A second callback function can also be supplied, and is called when the gateway is ready to send text messages to the network.

You can disable some messages (for example sensor boot messages) using the configuration settings (see Configuration Options section) in the case where your business logic doesn't need to see them.

onSensorData

The object passed to the runGateway method must contain a key onSensorData whose value must be a function that takes a single parameter. Values passed to that parameter will be JSON objects corresponding to the schemas described in Message Types.

Here's an example implementation that can process several types of incoming message and display relevant data:

const gateway = require('conectric-usb-gateway');
 
gateway.runGateway({
  onSensorMessage: (sensorMessage) => {
    const sensorId = sensorMessage.sensorId;
    const payload = sensorMessage.payload;
 
    switch (sensorMessage.type) {
      case 'boot':
        console.log(`Sensor ${sensorId} booted, reason ${payload.resetCause}`);
        break;
      case 'motion':
        console.log(`Sensor ${sensorId} detected motion.`);
        break;
      case 'tempHumidity':
        console.log(`Sensor ${sensorId} reports temp ${payload.temperature}${payload.temperatureUnit} / humidity ${payload.humidity}%.`);
        break;
      case 'switch':
        console.log(`Sensor ${sensorId}, switch state is ${payload.switch}.`);
        break;
      default:
        console.log('Unknown message type received!');
    }
  }  
});

onGatewayReady

This is an optional callback that should be provided if you want to know when the USB router has been inserted and the gateway has established communications with it and is ready to send messages. Use this if you wish to use the text message sending or RS-485 functionality.

const gateway = require('conectric-usb-gateway');
 
gateway.runGateway({
    onSensorMessage: (sensorMessage) => {
        console.log(sensorMessage);
    },
    onGatewayReady: () => {
        console.log('Gateway is ready.');
        const res = gateway.sendTextMessage({
            message: 'Hello World this is a test.',
            destination: 'da40'
        });
 
        console.log(`${res === true ? 'Message sent.' : 'Error sending message.'}`);
    }
});

If you want to broadcast the text message to any listening routers, use gateway.BROADCAST_ALL_ADDRESS as the destination value. To broadcast to those a single network hop away, use gateway.BROADCAST_LOCAL_ADDRESS.

Configuration Options

The object that is passed as the only parameter to the runGateway method can also contain any mixture of the following additional configuration keys. Adding additional keys that are not documented here will result in an error message from runGateway.

Example with some configuration options set, those which are omitted will use their default values:

const gateway = require('conectric-usb-gateway');
 
gateway.runGateway({
  onSensorMessage: (sensorMessage) => {
    console.log(sensorMessage);
  },
  sendBootMessages: false, // Suppress sensor boot/reboot messages
  useFahrenheitTemps: true // Report temperature in F not C
});

debugMode

Controls whether or not additional low level debugging is sent to console.log (informational) and console.error (error) from within the gateway module.

  • Possible values: true | false
  • Optional: yes
  • Default: false

decodeTextMessages

Controls whether or not text message payloads are decoded from hex.

  • Possible values: true | false
  • Optional: yes
  • Default: true

deDuplicateBursts

Some sensors broadcast messages in a burst, where the same message ID is sent more than once to ensure that it reaches its indended recipient. This parameter controls whether the gateway module should pass all messages having the same messsage ID to the onSensorData callback or only one of them. Applies to all message types.

  • Possible values: true | false
  • Optional: yes
  • Default: true

sendBootMessages

Sensors broadcast boot messages when a battery is inserted or other power reset event occurs. This parameter controls whether or not these messages are passed to the onSensorData callback.

  • Possible values: true | false
  • Optional: yes
  • Default: true

sendDecodedPayload

If true, messages supplied to the onSensorData callback will contain a payload key containing a JSON object that holds the decoded message payload. The form of this object will depend on which type of message was received (see Message Types).

  • Possible values: true | false
  • Optional: yes
  • Default: true

sendHopData

If true, messages supplied to the onSensorData callback will contain two extra keys:

  • numHops: The number of wireless hops that the message took across the network
  • maxHops: The maximum number of hops that the network allows (0 = unlimited)
  • Possible values: true | false
  • Optional: yes
  • Default: false

sendRawData

If true, messages supplied to the onSensorData callback will contain a rawData key containing the unencoded hex message received from the mesh network. Mostly useful for debugging the gateway module.

  • Possible values: true | false
  • Optional: yes
  • Default: false

switchOpenValue

Determines whether the library reports the switch sensor having an open circuit as true or false. Set according to your application's needs.

  • Possible values: true | false
  • Optional: yes
  • Default: false

useFahrenheitTemps

If true, messages of type tempHumidity will contain temperature in Fahrenheit. If false, messages of type tempHumidity will contain temperature in Celcius.

  • Possible values: true | false
  • Optional: yes
  • Default: false

Getting the Gateway's MAC Address

Should you need to access the mesh network MAC address for the USB router that the gateway module is using, you can do so in your callback function as follows:

const gateway = require('conectric-usb-gateway');
 
gateway.runGateway({
  onSensorMessage: (sensorMessage) => {
    console.log(gateway.macAddress); // '00124b0005141c71'
    console.log(sensorMessage);
  }
});

The MAC address is returned as a string. This could for example be useful to use in a message that your callback function sends to a server, so that the originating gateway can be identified if your system has several of them.

Getting Version Information from the Gateway

Should you need to know the gateway's Contiki OS version or Conectric firmware version, you can do so in your callback function as follows:

const gateway = require('conectric-usb-gateway');
 
gateway.runGateway({
  onSensorMessage: (sensorMessage) => {
    console.log(gateway.contikiVersion); // '3.x'
    console.log(gateway.conectricVersion); // '1.0.2'
    console.log(sensorMessage);
  }
});

Sending a Text Message

To send a text message to another USB router, you will need to know the last 4 characters of that router's MAC address (see above for how to obtain this).

Once you have that, simply call sendTextMessage:

const gateway = require('conectric-usb-gateway');
 
gateway.runGateway({
    onSensorMessage: (sensorMessage) => {
        console.log(sensorMessage);
    },
    onGatewayReady: () => {
        console.log('Gateway is ready.');
        const res = gateway.sendTextMessage({
            message: 'Hello World this is a test.',
            destination: 'da40'
        });
 
        console.log(`${res === true ? 'Message sent.' : 'Error sending message.'}`);
    }
});

This requires the gateway to be up and running, so should be called only once the onGatewayReady callback has been invoked. If you want to broadcast the text message to any listening routers, use gateway.BROADCAST_ALL_ADDRESS as the destination value. Use gateway.BROADCAST_LOCAL_ADDRESS to broadcast to local neighboring devices only.

Both message and destination are required parameters.

RS-485 Messaging

Using Conectric's wireless RS-485 module, messages can be exchanged with devices that use the RS-485 protocol.

Sending an RS-485 Configuration Message

This message is used to configure serial communications with the RS-485 device attached to the wireless RS-485 module.

The following parameters are all required when using sendRS485ConfigMessage:

  • baudRate: Valid values are 2400, 4800, 9600, 19200.
  • parity: Valid values are gateway.PARITY_NONE, gateway.PARITY_ODD and gateway.PARITY_EVEN.
  • stopBits: Valid values are 1 and 2.
  • destination: The last 4 characters of the MAC address of the device that the message is destined for e.g. da40.
const gateway = require('conectric-usb-gateway');
 
gateway.runGateway({
    onSensorMessage: (sensorMessage) => {
        console.log(sensorMessage);
    },
    onGatewayReady: () => {
        console.log('Gateway is ready.');
        const res = gateway.sendRS485ConfigMessage({
          baudRate: 4800,
          parity: gateway.PARITY_NONE,
          stopBits: 1,
          destination: 'da40'
        });
 
        console.log(`${res === true ? 'Message sent.' : 'Error sending message.'}`);
    }
});

This requires the gateway to be up and running, so should be called only once the onGatewayReady callback has been invoked. If you want to broadcast the text message to any listening routers, use gateway.BROADCAST_ALL_ADDRESS as the destination value. Use gateway.BROADCAST_LOCAL_ADDRESS to broadcast to local neighboring devices only.

Sending an RS-485 Request Message

This message is used to send data to an RS-485 device connected to a Conectric RS-485 wireless module.

The following parameters are required:

  • message: A string of data to be sent to the RS-485 device. The format / encoding of this data will depend on your RS-485 device.

And the following are optional parameters:

  • hexEncodePayload: If set to true, the value of message will be hex encoded before being sent to the wireless RS-485 module. If set to false, the value of message will be sent unchanged. Defaults to true.
const gateway = require('conectric-usb-gateway');
  
gateway.runGateway({
  onSensorMessage: (sensorMessage) => {
    console.log(sensorMessage);
  },
  onGatewayReady: () => {
    console.log('Gateway is ready.');
    gateway.sendRS485Request({
      message: '010600000001480a',
      destination: 'dfbc',
      hexEncodePayload: false
    });
  }
});
 

(Sends 010600000001480a to RS-485 wireless module whose MAC address ends dfbc).

This requires the gateway to be up and running, so should be called only once the onGatewayReady callback has been invoked. If you want to broadcast the text message to any listening routers, use gateway.BROADCAST_ALL_ADDRESS as the destination value. Use gateway.BROADCAST_LOCAL_ADDRESS to broadcast to local neighboring devices only.

Receiving an RS-485 Response Message

rs485Response messages arrive into the onSensorMessage callback function like any other messages from sensors:

const gateway = require('conectric-usb-gateway');
 
gateway.runGateway({
    onSensorMessage: (sensorMessage) => {
        if (sensorMessage.messageType === 'rs485Response') {
          console.log(sensorMessage.payload.rs485);
        }
    },
    onGatewayReady: () => {
        console.log('Gateway is ready.');
        // Send an rs485 message here...
    }
});

The data from the RS-485 device will be contained in sensorMessage.payload.rs485. The data's encoding will depend on the RS-485 device.

Bundled Examples

To get you started quickly, we have provided some basic example implementations that use the gateway module. These are located in the examples folder.

Example 1: Log Incoming Messages

Location: examples/logmessages.

Sensors Required: Any.

Description: This is the simplest example, which uses all the configuration defaults and simply logs each message received.

Usage: To run this example, use follow these simple steps:

mkdir iotgateway
cd iotgateway
npm init

Accept all the defaults, except "entry point", use server.js for that. Then:

npm install --save conectric-usb-gateway
cp node_modules/conectric-usb-gateway/examples/logmessages/server.js .
npm start

Then insert the Conectric USB router into a free USB port, and add batteries to your sensors.

If you want to modify this example for your own purposes, simply edit server.js and replace the contents of the callback function with your own logic.

Example 2: Send Incoming Messages to a Server

Location: examples/sendmessages.

Sensors Required: Any.

Description: This is a basic example showing how to receive messages from the mesh network and pass them to a server via HTTP POST to a URL. It uses the popular request module to manage the HTTP communications. You can make this work simply by editing the URL to match your needs then implementing some server side logic to receive the JSON messages and do as you please with them.

Usage: To run this example, follow these simple steps:

mkdir iotgateway
cd iotgateway
npm init

Accept all the defaults, except "entry point", use server.js for that. Then:

npm install --save conectric-usb-gateway
npm install --save request
cp node_modules/conectric-usb-gateway/examples/sendmessages/server.js .
npm start

Insert the Conectric USB stick into your computer. After a short while you should see messages from any Conectric sensors that are nearby arriving on your computer and being sent to the server URL.

Example 3: Send a Text Message to Another USB Router

Location: examples/textmessage.

Sensors Required: No sensors, requires two USB routers.

Description: This example shows how to send a text message betweeen two routers.

Usage: Before setting up this example, you will need to know the last 4 characters of the MAC address of the other USB router that will receive your message. When you have this, store it in an environment variable:

  • DESTINATION_ROUTER_ADDR, set to the last 4 characters of the receiving USB router's MAC address e.g. da40.

Once the environment variable has been set, follow these steps to install dependencies and set up npm:

mkdir iotgateway
cd iotgateway
npm init

Accept all the defaults, except "entry point", use server.js for that. Then:

npm install --save conectric-usb-gateway
cp node_modules/conectric-usb-gateway/examples/textmessage/server.js .

Don't start the gateway yet, we need to set up the second one first... On another computer, follow the instructions to set up Example 1: Log Incoming Messages. Start the message logging example code, and insert the USB router whose MAC address ends with the DESTINATION_ROUTER_ADDR that was set on the first computer.

Once the second computer reports that it is ready to receive messages, start the gateway on the first one:

npm start

It should start up and send the message:

> npm start
 
Waiting for USB router device.
USB Router device attached.
Found USB router device at /dev/tty.usbserial-DB00VL5G.
Gateway opened.
Switched gateway to dump payload mode.
USB router mac address is 00124b000513da7f.
USB router Contiki version: 3.x
USB router Conectric version: 1.0.2
Switched gateway to sink mode.
Gateway is ready.
Message sent.

And the second computer should report receipt of the message, decode it and log it:

{ type: 'text',
  payload: { 
    battery: 3.2, 
    text: 'Hello World this is a test.' 
  },
  timestamp: 1524285294,
  sensorId: 'ffff',
  sequenceNumber: 0 
}

Example 4: Exchange RS-485 Messages with Another USB Router

An RS-485 example will be provided in a future release.

Example 5: Send an SMS Message Via Twilio API When A Door Opens

Location: examples/twiliosms.

Sensors Required: Switch.

Description: This example uses the door (switch) sensor. Whenever the door is opened (sensor reports true), the callback function uses the Twilio SMS API to send a text message to a pre-determined phone number which is set via an environment variable.

In order to use this, you will need to sign up for a Twilio demo account, or use your own paid account if you have one.

Usage: Before setting up this example, you will need to get all of the following from Twilio:

  • Account SID.
  • Authentication Token.
  • Phone Number.
  • If using their trial, set up your cell phone's number as a verified number on the account.

Once you've done that, set some environment variables on your local machine:

  • TWILIO_ACCOUNT_SID, set to your Twilio Account SID.
  • TWILIO_AUTH_TOKEN, set to your Twilio Authentication Token.
  • TWILIO_PHONE_NUMBER, set to your Twilio Account's phone number (the one that SMS messages will appear to have come from).
  • TWILIO_DESTINATION_PHONE_NUMBER, set to the phone number you wish to send the SMS messages to (for trial accounts this must be a verified phone number with Twilio).

Once the environment variables have been set, follow these steps to install dependencies and set up npm:

mkdir iotgateway
cd iotgateway
npm init

Accept all the defaults, except "entry point", use server.js for that. Then:

npm install --save conectric-usb-gateway
npm install --save twilio
cp node_modules/conectric-usb-gateway/examples/twiliosms/server.js .
npm start

Insert the Conectric USB stick into your computer and turn on any door sensors. Once you open the door sensor (magnets apart) you should expect to see an SMS API call to Twilio which should trigger a text message to the phone whose number is set in TWILIO_DESTINATION_PHONE_NUMBER.

We also published an overview of how to set up and use this example as an article on Medium.

Example 6: Post Motion Events to a Slack Channel At A Configurable Minimum Interval

Location: examples/slackmotion.

Sensors Required: Motion.

Description: This example receives messages from motion sensors, and will report motion events to the popular collaboration / chat platform Slack after a configurable minimum time interval has passed since the last event.

Usage: Before starting up this example, you will need to get an incoming webhook URL from Slack for the Slack team that you wish to use. See the Slack API documentation for details of how to do so.

Once you have obtained your Slack webhook URL, go ahead and set the following environment variables on your local machine:

  • SLACK_WEBHOOK_URL, set to the full URL that you got from Slack.
  • MOTION_REPORTING_CHANNEL, set to the name of the Slack channel that you'd like messages posted to e.g. random. You don't need the leading # in the channel name here.
  • MOTION_REPORTING_INTERVAL, set the to minumum number of seconds that you'd like to have elapsed between motion events being sent to Slack e.g. 60 = 1 minute.

Having set the environment variables, follow these steps to install dependencies and set up npm:

mkdir iotgateway
cd iotgateway
npm init

Accept all the defaults, except "entry point", use server.js for that. Then:

npm install --save conectric-usb-gateway
npm install --save slack-node
cp node_modules/conectric-usb-gateway/examples/slackmotion/server.js .
npm start

Insert the Conectric USB stick into your computer then insert the batteries into your motion sensor(s). Trigger a motion sensor by waving at it, which should cause a motion event to be reported in your Slack channel. Subsequent messages will be sent to Slack when motion is detected if TEMPERATURE_REPORTING_INTERVAL seconds or more have passed since the last motion event was seen.

We also published an overview of how to set up and use this example as an article on Medium.

Example 7: Post Temperature Data to Elasticsearch

Location: examples/elastic.

Sensors Required: Temperature.

Description: This example receives messages from the mesh network, and reformats temperature/humidity sensor messages to flat JSON objects that it then sends to Elasticsearch. Objects are placed into an index called temphumidityreadings which is created for you if not found.

In order to use this, you will need to download and setup Elasticsearch, or use their cloud hosted solution. You could also use additional tools such as Grafana to visualize the data. Grafana is also available to download, or as a cloud hosted service.

Usage: Before starting up this example, you will need to:

  • Install Elasticsearch somewhere (locally, on a server, or use the hosted cloud trial).
  • Know the URL and port that your Elasticsearch is running on.
  • Know your Elasticsearch user name (often elastic) and password.

Once you have all of these things, set some environment variables on your local machine:

  • ELASTICSEARCH_URL, set to the Elasticsearch URL minus the port information. Must begin http:// or https:// e.g. https://elasticsearch.mydomain.com.
  • ELASTICSEARCH_USER, set to the Elasticsearch user's username e.g. elastic.
  • ELASTICSEARCH_PASSWORD, set to the Elasticsearch user's password.
  • ELASTICSEARCH_PORT, set to the port that Elasticsearch is running on e.g. 9243.

Once the environment variables have been set, follow these steps to install dependencies and set up npm:

mkdir iotgateway
cd iotgateway
npm init

Accept all the defaults, except "entry point", use server.js for that. Then:

npm install --save conectric-usb-gateway
npm install --save elasticsearch
cp node_modules/conectric-usb-gateway/examples/elastic/server.js .
npm start

Insert the Conectric USB stick into your computer. After a short while you should see temperature and humidity readings appear in Elasticsearch from any Conectric temperature sensors that you have nearby.

We also published an overview of how to set up and use this example as an article on Medium.

Power Management Tips

If your application requires continuous data gathering, you should ensure that the various power saving options on the computer that you plug the USB stick into are disabled. Otherwise, you may find that the computer may sleep the USB ports, causing a gap in your data collection.

Usage on Raspberry Pi

When using this module on a Raspberry Pi running the Raspbian operating system, we recommend using Raspbian Stretch Lite. Installation on Raspbian (Desktop or Lite edition) will require some additional steps to install a more up to date version of Node and additional packages required to enable USB support in Node.

Install Node.js

curl -sL https://deb.nodesource.com/setup_9.x | sudo -E bash -
sudo apt-get install -y nodejs

Check that Node was correctly installed:

npm --version
node --version

Install Required Packages for USB

Additional packages need to be installed to add USB support:

sudo apt-get install libusb-1.0-0-dev
sudo apt-get install libudev-dev

Licensing

This project is licensed under the terms of the MIT license.

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npm i conectric-usb-gateway

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