check-types

A little library for asserting types and values.

check-types.js

A little JavaScript library for asserting types and values.

Writing explicit conditions in your functions to check arguments and throw exceptions is a task that swiftly becomes tiresome and adds complexity to your codebase.

The purpose of check-types.js is to remove this burden from JavaScript application developers in an efficient and robust manner, abstracted by a simple API.

22 kb unminified with comments, 5.8 kb minified, 2 kb minified + gzipped.

If you're using npm:

npm install check-types --save

Or if you just want the git repo:

git clone git@github.com:philbooth/check-types.js.git

If you're into other package managers, it is also available from Bower, Component and Jam.

If you are running in Node.js, Browserify or another CommonJS-style environment, you can require check-types like so:

var check = require('check-types');

It also the supports the AMD-style format preferred by Require.js.

If you are including check-types.js with an HTML <script> tag, or neither of the above environments are detected, it will export the interface globally as check.

Once you have loaded the library in your application, a whole bunch of functions are available to call.

Most of the functions are predicates, which can be executed in a number of different contexts:

  • check.xxx(thing): These functions are basic predicates, returning true or false depending on the type and value of thing.

  • check.not.xxx(thing): The not modifier negates predicates, returning true if the predicate returns false and false if the predicate returns true. It is also itself a function, which simply returns the negation of its argument.

  • check.maybe.xxx(thing): The maybe modifier tweaks predicates to return true if thing is null or undefined, otherwise their normal result is returned. It is also itself a function, which returns true when its argument is null or undefined, otherwise it returns its argument.

  • check.either.xxx(thing).or.yyy(thang): The either modifier returns true if either predicate is true, it will only return false when both predicates are false.

  • check.assert.xxx(thing, message): The assert modifier changes predicates to throw when their result would otherwise be false. It can be applied to the not, maybe and either modifiers using the forms check.assert.not.xxx(thing, message), check.assert.maybe.xxx(thing, message) and check.assert.either.xxx(thing, message).or.yyy(thang). It is also itself a function, which simply throws when its argument is false.

  • check.array.of.xxx(thing): The array.of modifier first checks that it is operating on an array and then applies the modified predicate to each item of the array. If the predicate fails for any item, it returns false, otherwise it returns true. It can also be prefixed by other modifiers, so check.maybe.array.of, check.not.array.of, check.assert.array.of, check.assert.maybe.array.of and check.assert.not.array.of all work as you would expect them to.

  • check.arrayLike.of.xxx(thing): The arrayLike.of modifier is synonymous with array.of, except it operates on array-like objects.

  • check.iterable.of.xxx(thing): The iterable.of modifier is synonymous with array.of, except it operates on iterables.

  • check.object.of.xxx(thing): The object.of modifier is synonymous with array.of, except it operates on an object's properties.

Additionally, there are some batch operations that allow you to apply different predicates to each value in an array or object. These are implemented by check.apply, check.map, check.any and check.all.

  • check.string(thing): Returns true if thing is a string, false otherwise.

  • check.unemptyString(thing): Returns true if thing is a non-empty string, false otherwise.

  • check.contains(thing, substring): Returns true if thing is a string that contains substring, false otherwise.

  • check.match(thing, regex): Returns true if thing is a string that matches regex, false otherwise.

  • check.hasLength(thing, value): Returns true if thing has a length property that equals value, false otherwise.

  • check.number(thing): Returns true if thing is a number, false otherwise. Note that NaN, Number.POSITIVE_INFINITY and Number.NEGATIVE_INFINITY are not considered numbers here.

  • check.greater(thing, value): Returns true if thing is a number greater than value, false otherwise.

  • check.greaterOrEqual(thing, value): Returns true if thing is a number greater than or equal to value, false otherwise.

  • check.less(thing, value): Returns true if thing is a number less than value, false otherwise.

  • check.lessOrEqual(thing, value): Returns true if thing is a number less than or equal to value, false otherwise.

  • check.between(thing, a, b): Returns true if thing is a number between than a and b, false otherwise. The arguments a and b may be in any order, it doesn't matter which is greater.

  • check.inRange(thing, a, b): Returns true if thing is a number in the range a .. b, false otherwise. The arguments a and b may be in any order, it doesn't matter which is greater.

  • check.positive(thing): Returns true if thing is a number greater than zero, false otherwise.

  • check.negative(thing): Returns true if thing is a number less than zero, false otherwise.

  • check.zero(thing): Returns true if thing is zero, false otherwise.

  • check.odd(thing): Returns true if thing is an odd number, false otherwise.

  • check.even(thing): Returns true if thing is an even number, false otherwise.

  • check.integer(thing): Returns true if thing is an integer, false otherwise.

  • check.boolean(thing): Returns true if thing is a boolean, false otherwise.
  • check.array(thing): Returns true if thing is an array, false otherwise.

  • check.emptyArray(thing): Returns true if thing is an empty array, false otherwise.

  • check.hasLength(thing, value): Returns true if thing has a length property that equals value, false otherwise.

  • check.arrayLike(thing): Returns true if thing has a numeric length property, false otherwise.

  • check.iterable(thing): Returns true if thing implements the iterable protocol, false otherwise. In pre-ES6 environments, this predicate falls back to arrayLike behaviour.

  • check.object(thing): Returns true if thing is a plain-old JavaScript object, false otherwise.

  • check.emptyObject(thing): Returns true if thing is an empty object, false otherwise.

  • check.instance(thing, prototype): Returns true if thing is an instance of prototype, false otherwise.

  • check.like(thing, duck): Duck-typing checker. Returns true if thing has all of the properties of duck, false otherwise.

  • check.date(thing): Returns true if thing is a valid date, false otherwise.
  • check.error(thing): Returns true if thing is an error, false otherwise.
  • check.function(thing): Returns true if thing is a function, false otherwise.

  • check.hasLength(thing, value): Returns true if thing has a length property that equals value, false otherwise.

  • check.null(thing): Returns true if thing is null, false otherwise.

  • check.undefined(thing): Returns true if thing is undefined, false otherwise.

  • check.assigned(thing): Returns true if thing is not null or undefined, false otherwise.

  • check.not(value): Returns the negation of value.

  • check.not.xxx(...): Returns the negation of the predicate.

  • check.maybe(value): Returns true if value is null or undefined, otherwise it returns value.

  • check.maybe.xxx(...): Returns true if thing is null or undefined, otherwise it propagates the return value from its predicate.

  • check.either.xxx(...).or.yyy(...): Returns true if either predicate is true. Returns false if both predicates are false.

  • check.array.of.xxx(value): Returns true if value is an array and the predicate is true for every item. Also works with the not and maybe modifiers.

  • check.arrayLike.of.xxx(thing): The arrayLike.of modifier is synonymous with array.of, except it operates on array-like objects.

  • check.iterable.of.xxx(thing): The iterable.of modifier is synonymous with array.of, except it operates on iterables.

  • check.object.of.xxx(thing): The object.of modifier is synonymous with array.of, except it operates on an object's properties.

  • check.assert(value, message): Throws an Error if value is false, setting message on the Error instance.

  • check.assert.xxx(...): Throws an Error if the predicate returns false. The last argument is an optional message to be set on the Error instance. Also works with the not, maybe, either and ...of modifiers.

  • check.apply(things, predicates): Applies each value from the things array to the corresponding predicate and returns the array of results. Passing a single predicate instead of an array applies all of the values to the same predicate.

  • check.map(things, predicates): Maps each value from the things object to the corresponding predicate and returns an object containing the results. Supports nested objects. Passing a single predicate instead of an object applies all of the values to the same predicate, ignore nested objects.

  • check.all(results): Returns true if all the result values are true in an array (returned from apply) or object (returned from map).

  • check.any(predicateResults): Returns true if any result value is true in an array (returned from apply) or object (returned from map).

check.even(3);
// Returns false 
check.not.even(3);
// Returns true 
check.maybe.even(null);
// Returns true 
check.either.even(3).or.odd(3);
// Returns true 
check.assert.like({ foo: 'bar' }, { baz: 'qux' }, 'Invalid object');
// Throws new Error('Invalid object') 
check.assert.not.like({ foo: 'bar' }, { baz: 'qux' }, 'Invalid object');
// Doesn't throw 
check.assert.maybe.like(undefined, { foo: 'bar' }, 'Invalid object');
// Doesn't throw 
check.assert(myFunction(), 'Something went wrong');
// Throws if myFunction returns `false` 
check.apply([ 'foo', 'bar', '' ], check.unemptyString);
// Returns [ true, true, false ] 
check.map({
    foo: 2,
    bar: { baz: 'qux' }
}, {
    foo: check.odd,
    bar: { baz: check.unemptyString }
});
// Returns { foo: false, bar: { baz: true } } 
check.all(
    check.map(
        { foo: 0, bar: '' },
        { foo: check.number, bar: check.string }
    );
);
// Returns true 
check.any(
    check.apply(
        [ 1, 2, 3, '' ],
        check.string
    )
);
// Returns true 

As of version 2.0, this library no longer supports ES3. That means you can't use it in IE 7 or 8.

Everywhere else should be fine.

If those versions of IE are important to you, worry not! The 1.x versions all support old IE and any future 1.x versions will adhere to that too.

See the releases for more information.

Breaking changes were made to the API in version 3.0.0.

Specifically, the predicate length was renamed to hasLength and the predicate webUrl was removed.

See the history for more details.

Breaking changes were made to the API in version 2.0.0.

Specifically:

  • Support for ES3 was dropped
  • The predicates gitUrl, email and floatNumber were removed.
  • verify was renamed to assert.
  • nulled was renamed to null.
  • oddNumber was renamed to odd.
  • evenNumber was renamed to even.
  • positiveNumber was renamed to positive.
  • negativeNumber was renamed to negative.
  • intNumber was renamed to integer.
  • bool was renamed to boolean.
  • defined was swapped to become undefined.
  • webUrl was tightened to reject more cases.

See the history for more details.

Breaking changes were made to the API in version 1.0.0.

Specifically, all of the predicates were renamed from check.isXxxx to check.xxx and all of the verifiers were renamed from check.verifyXxxx to check.verify.xxx.

See the history for more details.

The build environment relies on Node.js, NPM, JSHint, Mocha, Chai and UglifyJS. Assuming that you already have Node.js and NPM set up, you just need to run npm install to install all of the dependencies as listed in package.json.

The unit tests are in test/check-types.js. You can run them with the command npm test. To run the tests in a web browser, open test/check-types.html.

MIT