angular-join

0.3.2 • Public • Published

angular-join

Build Status Bower NPM License

A Node & AngularJS service providing RDBMS functionality for JavaScript arrays.

Demo/Documentation

Installation

If you're using Bower:

bower install angular-join --save

Angular JOIN does not have any dependencies beside Angular itself.

Include the angular-join.js script in your HTML:

<script src="path/to/angular-join.js"></script>

Add 'angular-join' as a dependency in your Angular app:

angular.module('myApp', ['angular-join']);

Angular JOIN can also be installed via NPM:

npm install angular-join --save

The NPM module uses the Q module by kriskowal.

Usage

This module provides the Join service/module, which exposes functions to create SQL-like queries on JavaScript arrays.

AngularJS

Inject Join in your Angular modules as needed. For example:

angular.module('myApp')
.controller('MyCtrl', ['$scope', 'Join', function($scope, Join) {
  // Use the Join module to build queries
  var query = Join
    .selectFrom(...)
    .where(...)
    .hashJoin(...)
    .hashGroupBy(...)
    .having(...)
    .orderBy(...)
    .limit(...);
 
  var results = query.execute();
}]);

Node

In your Node application, require('angular-join') will return an object containing the functions below:

var Join = require('angular-join');
 
// Use the Join module to build queries
var query = Join
  .selectFrom(...)
  .where(...)
  .hashJoin(...)
  .hashGroupBy(...)
  .having(...)
  .orderBy(...)
  .limit(...);
 
var results = query.execute();

The Join service/module is mainly used to create new query objects via Join.selectFrom(...), but most functions below can also be called statically.

The Query Object

The query object represents an SQL-like query constructed using the API described below. A query is constructed with a starting array and using method-chaining to queue operations that will transform that array and/or join it to other arrays. Each call will perform the requested operation on the results of the previous operation; this allows a query to be incrementally constructed using a fluent interface.

New queries are constructed using the Join.selectFrom function, which takes an array as the starting data on which to perform subsequent operations.

Neither the starting array nor any other input arrays are ever modified; all operations create a new array to be returned or passed in as the input of the next operation.

None of the operations in the query are performed until the execute function is called, which returns the array resulting from sequentially running all the operations queued on the query, which allows them to be constructed in one place and executed in another. If called with the {async: true} option, a promise object is returned instead, which is resolved with the final array.

Query objects are instances of JoinQuery and each operation (with the exception of execute) results in the creation of a new object. The first time that execute is called, the results of the query (and all queries on which this one is dependent) are cached, and subsequent calls return the cached results instead of recalculating them. This results in more efficient queries, especially when one query uses another as its starting point. However, if inputs change in between calls to execute, the cached results may become stale and execute should be called with the {force: true} option.

selectFrom

SELECT ... FROM input ...

Returns a new query object that uses input as its starting array.

Note: .selectFrom() is a function of the Join service, and not of a query object.

This is usually the first in a chain of function calls to create a more complex query. If the optional callback is included, then subsequent operations are applied to a new array whose elements are the return values of callback applied to each element of input. Providing the callback works identically to calling Join.selectFrom(input).select(callback) instead.

Syntax

Join
  .selectFrom(input[, callback])

Arguments

  • input (array/JoinQuery)
    • If an array, the input array to start the query.
    • If a JoinQuery, the result of that query is used to start this query.
  • callback (function/string/array)
    • Optional
    • Function executed as callback(e), where e is an element of input. This is used to transform the input elements (e.g. by selecting only a subset of their properties) before other operations are chained to the query, and works identically to Array.prototype.map().
    • If a string is passed in, then only that property of the elements of input is included in the resulting array.
    • If an array of property names is passed in, then only those properties of the elements of input are included in the resulting array.
    • Unlike the SQL SELECT command, which specifies the fields to return at the end of a query, the callback only specifies the array elements to provide to the next operation, meaning if you want SQL-like behaviour, call .select as the last operation in the query.
    • Join.selectFrom(input, callback) is equivalent to Join.selectFrom(input).select(callback).

Returns

  • query
    • A query object with input (optionally transformed by callback) as the starting array.

execute

SELECT ...
  ...
  ; /* THIS PART */

Runs the query and returns the resulting array, or a promise object that resolves to the resulting array (see options below).

This function may be called more than once on the same query. The first time it is called, the results of the query (and all queries on which this one is dependent) are cached, and subsequent calls return the cached results instead of recalculating them. This results in more efficient queries, especially when one query uses another as its starting point. However, if inputs change in between calls, the cached results may become stale and execute should be called with the {force: true} option (see options below).

Syntax

query
  .execute([options])

Arguments

  • options (object)
    • Optional
    • Object containing the following properties:
      • async (boolean): If true, then instead of returning the resulting array, execute the query asynchronously and return a promise object that resolves to the resulting array. Default is false.
      • force (boolean): If false, then cached results (if available) from the last call to execute are returned. This results in faster queries, but may return stale results if any input arrays have changed since the last execution. If true, then the query is re-executed and its cache (and those of all queries on which this one is dependent) is updated. Default is false.

Returns

  • array/promise
    • If the {async: true} option was not used, the array resulting from executing the query is returned. Otherwise, a promise object is returned that resolves to the resulting array.

select / map

SELECT ...

Transforms each element in the query results with the return values of callback.

The .select and .map functions are equivalent and both are provided as syntactic sugar.

Join.selectFrom(input).select(callback) is equivalent to Join.selectFrom(input, callback).

Syntax

query
  .select(callback) // or .map(callback)

Arguments

  • callback (function/string/array)
    • Optional
    • Function executed as callback(e), where e is an element of the query array. This is used to transform the elements (e.g. by selecting only a subset of their properties) before other operations are chained to the query, and works identically to Array.prototype.map().
    • If a string is passed in, then only that property of the query array elements is included in the resulting array.
    • If an array of property names is passed in, then only those properties of the elements of the query array are included in the resulting array.
    • Unlike the SQL SELECT command, which specifies the fields to return at the end of a query, the callback only specifies the array elements to provide to the next operation, meaning if you want SQL-like behaviour, call .select as the last operation in the query.

Returns

  • query
    • A query object where each element of the previous query's results have been replaced by the values returned by callback.

where / having / filter

SELECT ... FROM ...
  WHERE ...  /* THIS PART */
  GROUP BY ...
  HAVING ... /* AND/OR THIS PART */

Filter the query results to only include elements passing the test implemented by callback.

The .where, .having, and .filter functions are all equivalent and are provided as syntactic sugar to make query construction more SQL-like; in particular, .having is provided to be used after a *GroupBy operation.

Syntax

query
  .where(callback) // or .having|.filter(callback)

Arguments

  • callback (function)
    • Function executed as callback(e), where e is an element of the query array. The resulting query contains only those elements for which a truthy value is returned, identically to Array.prototype.filter().

Returns

  • query
    • A query object where only elements of the previous query's results having callback(e) == true are included.

orderBy / sort

SELECT ...
  ORDER BY ...

Sort the query results according to comparator.

The .orderBy and .sort functions are equivalent and both are provided as syntactic sugar.

Syntax

query
  .orderBy(comparator[, options]) // or .sort(comparator[, options])

Arguments

  • comparator (function/string/array)
    • Function executed as comaprator(e1, e2), where e1 and e2 are elements of the query array. The resulting query's results are sorted according to the returned values.
    • This function follows the same spec as Array.prototype.sort(), except that instead of sorting in-place, a new array will be created (as is the case with every query operation).
    • If a string is passed in, then the query elements are sorted by that property in ascending order. If the property itself is a string, then the sorting strategy is determined by the localeCompare option; if the property is an object with a diff() function, then this function is expected to have the same spec as the callback in Array.prototype.sort(), and it is used to sort the query results. Otherwise, the properties are converted to numbers and used for sorting.
    • If an array of property names is passed in, then the query elements are sorted in ascending order by each property in sequence, following the same logic on each property as described above.
  • options (object)
    • Optional
    • Object containing the following properties:
      • localeCompare (boolean): If true, this signifies that strings should be sorted using the String.prototype.localeCompare() function. If false (default), strings are sorted according to each character's Unicode code point value. This parameter is only used if comparator is a string or an array of property names. Setting this parameter to true results in generally slower sorts for string properties, but may be necessary if the properties are locale-sensitive.

Returns

  • query
    • A query object whose elements are sorted according to comparator(e1, e2).

limit / offset

SELECT ...
  LIMIT ... [OFFSET ...]

Returns a slice of the query results according the specified length and/or offset.

The .limit(length, offset) function is equivalent to .slice(offset, offset + length), and .offset(offset) is equivalent to .slice(offset). The variants are provided as syntactic sugar.

Calling .limit(length, offset) is equivalent to calling .offset(offset).limit(length).

Syntax

query
  .limit(length[, offset])
 
query
  .offset(offset)

Arguments

  • length (number)
    • The maximum length to which to limit the query result. If this is longer than the length of the curren query result, then the result is limited up to and including the last element.
  • offset (number)
    • Optional for limit()
    • The starting index (zero-based) of the returned query result, before limiting to a specified length.

Returns

  • query
    • A query object whose results are a slice of the previous results.

slice

SELECT ...
  LIMIT ... [OFFSET ...]

Returns a slice of the query results according the specified begin and end.

This function follows the same spec as [Array.prototype.slice()][].

The .slice(begin, end) function is equivalent to .limit(begin, end - begin), and .slice(begin) is equivalent to .offset(begin). The variants are provided as syntactic sugar.

Syntax

query
  .slice([begin[, end]])

Arguments

  • begin (number)
    • Optional
    • The index (zero-based) of the query result at which to begin extraction. Default is 0.
  • end (number)
    • Optional
    • The index (zero-based) of the query result before which to end extraction. Default is the end of the current query result.

Returns

  • query
    • A query object whose results are a slice of the previous results.

hashJoin

SELECT ...
  FROM ...
  [INNER|LEFT|RIGHT|FULL OUTER|CROSS] JOIN ... USING (...) /* THIS PART */

Joins the query result to another array using a version of the Hash Join algorithm.

It is appropriate when the source arrays are small and unsorted, and if the resulting array does not need to be returned in any particular order. For large sorted arrays, mergeJoin is much more efficient.

Syntax

query
  .hashJoin(right, hashFcn, callback)

Arguments

  • right (array/JoinQuery)
    • If an array, the righthand array in the join operation.
    • If a JoinQuery, the result of that query is used as the righthand array in the join operation.
  • hashFcn (function/string/array)
    • Function executed as hashFcn(e), where e is an element of the current query result (the "left" array) or right, and returning a number or string. Values of e for which hashFcn(e) returns the same value are considered equal and will be joined as specified by the callback function.
    • If a string is passed in, then that property of each array element is used as the hash. For example, passing in "x" is roughly equivalent to passing in function(e) { return e['x']; }.
    • If an array of property names is passed in, then the JSON representation of an array of those properties from each array element is used as the hash. For example, passing in ['x', 'y'] is equivalent to passing in function(e) { return JSON.stringify([e.x, e.y]); }.
    • Using the function version and returning the same value for all inputs can be used to implement cross/cartesian joins.
  • callback (function)
    • Function executed as callback(e1, e2), where e1 and e2 are elements of the current query result and right, respectively (or null; see below). If the returned value is truthy, it is added to the query result.
    • For each pair of e1 and e2 where hashFcn(e1) == hashFcn(e2), callback(e1, e2) is called once per pair. Returning a value only when neither e1 or e2 are null can be used to implement inner joins.
    • For each e1 where there is no matching e2, callback(e1, null) is called once. Correspondingly, for each e2 where there is no matching e1, callback(null, e2) is called once. Returning a value in these cases can be used to implement left/right/full outer joins.
    • Returning a value when only one of e1 or e2 is non-null can be used to implement left/right anti-joins.

Returns

  • query
    • A query object whose result is the join of the previous query result (the "left" array) and right: for each call to callback(left[m], right[n]) returning a truthy value, that element is added to the query result.

mergeJoin

SELECT ...
  FROM ...
  [INNER|LEFT|RIGHT|FULL OUTER|CROSS] JOIN ... USING (...) /* THIS PART */

Joins the query result to another array using a version of the Sort-Merge Join algorithm.

It is much more efficient than hashJoin when the source arrays already sorted (see options.sorted below).

Syntax

query
  .mergeJoin(right, comparator, callback[, options])

Arguments

  • right (array/JoinQuery)
    • If an array, the righthand array in the join operation.
    • If a JoinQuery, the result of that query is used as the righthand array in the join operation.
  • comparator (function/string/array)
    • Function executed as comparator(e1, e2), where e1 and e2 are elements of the current query result (the "left" array) and right, respectively, and has the same spec as compareFunction in Array.prototype.sort(). If comparator(e1, e2) === 0, then e1 and e2 are considered equal and will be joined as specified by the callback function.
    • If a string is passed in, then the query elements are sorted by that property in ascending order. If the property itself is a string, then the sorting strategy is determined by the localeCompare option; if the property is an object with a diff() function, then this function is expected to have the same spec as the callback in Array.prototype.sort(), and it is used to sort the query results. Otherwise, the properties are converted to numbers and used for sorting.
    • If an array of property names is passed in, then the query elements are sorted in ascending order by each property in sequence, following the same logic on each property as described above.
  • callback (function)
    • Function executed as callback(e1, e2), where e1 and e2 are elements of the current query result (the "left" array) and right, respectively (or null; see below). If the returned value is truthy, it is added to the query result.
    • For each equivalent pair of e1 and e2, callback(e1, e2) is called once per pair. Returning a value only when neither e1 or e2 are null can be used to implement inner joins.
    • For each e1 where there is no matching e2, callback(e1, null) is called once. Correspondingly, for each e2 where there is no matching e1, callback(null, e2) is called once. Returning a value in these cases can be used to implement left/right/full outer joins.
    • Returning a value when only one of e1 or e2 is non-null can be used to implement left/right anti-joins.
  • options (object)
    • Optional
    • Object containing the following properties:
      • sorted (boolean): If true, this signifies that both input arrays are already sorted according to comparator. This provides a significant performance boost. Default is false.
      • localeCompare (boolean): If true, this signifies that strings should be sorted using the String.prototype.localeCompare() function. If false (default), strings are sorted according to each character's Unicode code point value. This parameter is only used if comparator is a string or an array of property names. Setting this parameter to true results in generally slower sorts for string properties, but may be necessary if the properties are locale-sensitive.

Returns

  • query
    • A query object whose result is the join of the previous query result (the "left" array) and right: for each call to callback(left[m], right[n]) returning a truthy value, that element is added to the query result.

hashGroupBy

SELECT ... /* AGGREGATE FUNCTIONS */
  FROM ...
  ...
  GROUP BY ... /* THIS PART */

Reduces query result elements that have the same hash into single elements. Group membership is defined by the hashFcn function, where equal elements (i.e. where hashFcn(e1) === hashFcn(e2)) belong to the same group.

The result is similar to partitioning the query elements into sub-arrays of elements that have the same hash (according to hashFcn), calling Array.prototype.reduce() on each, and returning an array of each returned value.

Syntax

query
  .hashGroupBy(hashFcn, callback)

Arguments

  • hashFcn (function/string/array)
    • Function executed as hashFcn(e), where e is an element of the current query result, and returning a number or string. Values of e for which hashFcn(e) returns the same value are considered to be in the same group.
    • If a string is passed in, then that property of each array element is used as the hash. For example, passing in "x" is roughly equivalent to passing in function(e) { return e['x']; }.
    • If an array of property names is passed in, then the JSON representation of an array of those properties from each array element is used as the hash. For example, passing in ['x', 'y'] is equivalent to passing in function(e) { return JSON.stringify([e.x, e.y]); }.
  • callback (function)
    • Function executed as callback(previousValue, e), where e is an element of the current query result and previousValue is the last value returned by callback for the group to which e belongs. On the first call for a particular group, previousValue === null. The last value returned for each group is the one included for that group in the query result array.
    • This function must always return a value.

Returns

  • query
    • A query object whose result has one element per group (as defined by hashFcn), where that element is the last value returned by callback for that group.

sortGroupBy

SELECT ... /* AGGREGATE FUNCTIONS */
  FROM ...
  ...
  GROUP BY ... /* THIS PART */

Reduces query result elements that are equal into single elements. Group membership is defined by the comparator function, where equal elements (i.e. where comparator(e1, e2) === 0) belong to the same group.

The result is similar to partitioning the query elements into sub-arrays of elements that are equal (according to comparator), calling Array.prototype.reduce() on each, and returning an array of each returned value.

Syntax

query
  .sortGroupBy(comparator, callback[, options])

Arguments

  • comparator (function/string/array)
    • Function executed as comparator(e1, e2), where e1 and e2 are elements of the current query result. This function has the same spec as compareFunction in Array.prototype.sort(). If comparator(e1, e2) === 0, then e1 and e2 are considered to be in the same group.
    • If a string is passed in, then the query elements are sorted by that property in ascending order. If the property itself is a string, then the sorting strategy is determined by the localeCompare option; if the property is an object with a diff() function, then this function is expected to have the same spec as the callback in Array.prototype.sort(), and it is used to sort the query results. Otherwise, the properties are converted to numbers and used for sorting.
    • If an array of property names is passed in, then the query elements are sorted in ascending order by each property in sequence, following the same logic on each property as described above.
  • callback (function)
    • Function executed as callback(previousValue, e), where e is an element of the current query result and previousValue is the last value returned by callback for the group to which e belongs. On the first call for a particular group, previousValue === null. The last value returned for each group is the one included for that group in the query result array.
    • This function must always return a value.
  • options (object)
    • Optional
    • Object containing the following properties:
      • sorted (boolean): If true, this signifies that both input arrays are already sorted according to comparator. This provides a significant performance boost. Default is false.
      • localeCompare (boolean): If true, this signifies that strings should be sorted using the String.prototype.localeCompare() function. If false (default), strings are sorted according to each character's Unicode code point value. This parameter is only used if comparator is a string or an array of property names. Setting this parameter to true results in generally slower sorts for string properties, but may be necessary if the properties are locale-sensitive.

Returns

  • query
    • A query object whose result has one element per group (as defined by comparator), where that element is the last value returned by callback for that group.

inspect

Note: This function has is no analogue in SQL.

Inspect the current query result using the provided callback.

This may be inserted in the middle of query construction to inspect or extract the array at that point in execution. The provided callback function will be called with the result array as its only argument.

The main difference between this function and execute is that instead of an array or a promise, this function returns the query object, allowing you to continue constructing your query. Also, like other operations, the callback is not executed until execute is called.

The two main use-cases for this function are debugging and efficiency. For example, the intermediate results in the Fluent Demo on the documentation page were constructed using .inspect() inserted at various points within the construction of a single query, which allows us to see each step of the query with less code than constructing/executing multiple queries.

Like all other query operations, inspect is not executed if the cache is used. To force all operations (including inspect) to be executed, use the {force:true} option of execute.

Syntax

query
  // operations
  .inspect(callback)
  // more operations

Arguments

  • callback (function)
    • Function executed as callback(arr), where arr is the query result array (i.e. the array constructed by earlier operations in this query, and used as input to subsequent operations).

Returns

  • query
    • A query object whose results are the same as those passed into callback.

Static Functions

If all you want to do is use a single operation, all of the functions above (excluding inspect, and execute) have static versions in the Join service. They are called by putting the input array, the one normally passed into selectFrom, as the first argument. In fact, excluding the exceptions above, Join.operation(input, ...) is equivalent to Join.selectFrom(input).operation(...).execute().

The static versions currently do not have an asynchronous mode. That is, there is no way to have them return a promise object instead of the resulting array, as can be done on query objects with .execute({async: true}).

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