@xpack/logger
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    5.0.2 • Public • Published

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    A generic console logger class

    A Node.js module with a generic console logger.

    Prerequisites

    A recent Node.js (>=10.x), since the TypeScript code is compiled to ECMAScript 2018 code.

    Easy install

    The module is available as @xpack/logger from the public repository; use npm to install it inside the module where it is needed:

    npm install @xpack/logger@latest

    The module does not provide any executables, and generally there are no reasons to install it globally.

    The development repository is available from the GitHub xpack/logger-ts project.

    User info

    This section is intended for those who want to use this module in their own projects.

    The @xpack/logger module can be imported in both TypeScript and JavaScript Node.js code.

    In TypeScript, use import:

    import { Logger } from '@xpack/xpm-liquid'

    In JavaScript, use require():

    const { Logger } = require('@xpack/logger')

    The typical use case is to create an instance of the Logger object, then log at different levels:

    const log = new Logger({
      level: 'info'
    })
    
    log.info('hello') // Displayed on stdout.
    log.debug('world') // Ignored.

    In more complex use cases, the log level can be tested and the possibly long operations be performed only if necessary.

    Log levels

    The following strings are recognised as valid level names:

    export type LogLevel =
      'silent' | 'error' | 'warn' | 'info' | 'verbose' | 'debug' | 'trace' | 'all'

    Internally they are converted to integer values, and these integers are used in comparisons. Higher values mean more verbosity.

    Delaying setting the log level

    There are cases when the logger must be created very early in the life cycle of an application, even before it is practically possible to determine the log level.

    For these cases, if the logger is created without a log level, it is set to a preliminary state, and all log lines are stored in an internal buffer**, until the log level is set, when the buffer is walked and the lines are processed.

    Constructor

    Logger(params: ConstructorParameters)

    The common use case is to create the logger instance with a console and a string level name.

    export interface LoggerParameters {
      level?: LogLevel
      console?: Console
    }

    If present, the console must be an object with at least two methods, log() and error(), as defined in the Node.js documentation for console.

    By default, the system console is used.

    Example:

    const log = new Logger({
      console: myConsole,
      level: 'info'
    })

    The level property is optional since it can be set later. Without it, the constructor will create the logger in a preliminary state, and all log lines will be stored in an internal buffer until the log level is set.

    Example:

    const log = new Logger()

    Managing the log levels

    The log level is managed by a setter/getter pair.

    set level (level: LogLevel) (setter)

    Set the log level. If this is the first time the log level is set, flush the internal buffer.

    Example:

    log.level = 'info'

    get level (): LogLevel (getter)

    Get the current log level, as a string.

    Example:

    console.log(log.level)

    get hasLevel (): boolean (getter)

    [Added in v2.1.0] [Changed to getters in v5.0.0]

    Return true if the level was set.

    Example:

    if (!log.hasLevel) {
      log.level = defaultLevel
    }

    Logging lines

    All functions accept an optional string message and possibly some arguments, as processed by the standard Node.js util.format(msg, ...args) function.

    always (msg: any = '', ...args: any[]): void

    Log always, regardless of the log level, even 'silent', when no other messages are logged. The message is passed via console.log()

    Example:

    log.always(version)

    error (msg: any = '', ...args: any[]): void

    Log errors, if the log level is 'error' or higher. The message is prefixed with error: and passed via console.error().

    Example:

    log.error('Not good...')

    error (msg: Error): void

    This is a special case when the input is an Error object. It is expanded, including a full stack trace, and passed via console.error().

    Example:

    try {
      // ...
    } catch (ex) {
      log.error(ex)
    }

    output (msg: any = '', ...args: any[]): void

    Log errors, if the log level is 'error' or higher. The message is passed via console.log.

    It differs from error() by not prefixing the string with error: and using console.log() instead of console.error().

    Examples:

    log.output('Not good either...')
    try {
      // ...
    } catch (ex) {
      // Do not show the stack trace.
      log.output(ex.message)
    }

    warn (msg: any = '', ...args: any[]): void

    Log warnings, if the log level is 'warn' or higher. The message is prefixed with warning: and passed via console.error().

    Example:

    log.warn('Beware...')

    info (msg: any = '', ...args: any[]): void

    Log informative messages, if the log level is 'info' or higher. The message is passed via console.log().

    Example:

    log.info(title)

    verbose (msg: any = '', ...args: any[]): void

    Log more informative messages, if the log level is 'verbose' or higher. The message is passed via console.log().

    Example:

    log.verbose('Configurations:')

    debug (msg: any = '', ...args: any[]): void

    Log debug messages, if the log level is 'debug' or higher. The message is passed via console.log().

    Example:

    log.debug(`spawn: ${cmd}`)

    trace (msg: any = '', ...args: any[]): void

    Log debug messages, if the log level is 'trace' or higher. The message is passed via console.log().

    Example:

    log.trace(`${this.constructor.name}.doRun()`)

    Checking log levels

    If the logging code is more complex than a single line, for example it needs a long loop, it is recommended to explicitly check the log level and if not high enough, skip the code entirely.

    Example:

      if (log.isVerbose) {
        for (const [folderName, folder] of Object.entries(folders)) {
          log.trace(`'${folderName}' ${folder.toolchainOptions}`)
        }
      }

    [Changed to getters in v3.0.0]

    get isSilent (): boolean (getter)

    Return true if the log level is 'silent' or higher.

    get isError (): boolean (getter)

    Return true if the log level is 'error' or higher.

    get isWarn (): boolean (getter)

    Return true if the log level is 'warn' or higher.

    get isInfo (): boolean (getter)

    Return true if the log level is 'info' or higher.

    get isVerbose (): boolean (getter)

    Return true if the log level is 'verbose' or higher.

    get isDebug (): boolean (getter)

    Return true if the log level is 'debug' or higher.

    get isTrace (): boolean (getter)

    Return true if the log level is 'trace' or higher.

    get isAll (): boolean (getter)

    Return true if the log level is 'all'.

    get console (): Console (getter)

    Return the console object associated with the logger.

    Logger.defaultLevel

    A static definition with the default logger level (info).

    Logger.numericLevels

    A static map with the internal values for the log levels.

    Compatibility notices

    According to semver requirements, incompatible API changes require higher major numbers.

    v5.x

    For consistency reasons, hasLevel was changed from a method to a getter.

    Internally, the log level starts as undefined instead of the string 'undefined', as in previous versions.

    This should not be a problem, given that the method to check if the level was set is via hasLevel().

    v4.x

    The code was migrated to TypeScript.

    The migration itself should not introduce any incompatibilities, actually it should be fairly compatible with the latest v3.x, but, for just in case, the safer path was to consider it a major release.

    v3.x

    All isXyx functions (returning a boolean related to the log level) were changed to getters.

    v2.x

    The logger constructor was changed to use the generic arguments object.

    If upgrading from previous versions, change the syntax from:

    const log = new Logger(console, 'info')

    to:

    const log = new Logger({
      console,
      level: 'info'
    })

    Maintainer & developer info

    This page documents how to use this module in an user application. For developer and maintainer information, see the separate README-DEVELOPER and README-MAINTAINER pages.

    License

    The original content is released under the MIT License, with all rights reserved to Liviu Ionescu.

    Install

    npm i @xpack/logger

    DownloadsWeekly Downloads

    20

    Version

    5.0.2

    License

    MIT

    Unpacked Size

    36.3 kB

    Total Files

    10

    Last publish

    Collaborators

    • ilg