vue-pug-loader

    1.1.26 • Public • Published

    vue-pug-loader

    A Webpack loader that compiles pug templates into HTML specifically for use in Vue component templates. Forked from pug-plain-loader, added vue-pug-plugin to convert native pug syntax into an AST that Vue will understand.

    If you want first class pug support in Vue component templates, and you don't use Webpack/Laravel Mix, use vue-pug-plugin instead.

    The motivation for this fork is to add first-class pug syntax support in the context of Vue component templates. Instead of writing an ugly mish-mash of pug and Vue syntax in your component, eg:

    <template lang="pug">
    ul
      li(v-for="item in items")
        a(v-if="item.type == 'link'" :href="item.url") some link title: {{item.title}}
        p(v-else) {{item.content}}
    </template>
    
    <script> 
      // ...Vue component JS

    With vue-pug-loader you can rely on the proper, first-class native pug syntax for iteration and conditionals, as well as var interpolation, eg:

    <template lang="pug">
    ul
      for item in items
        li
          if item.type == 'link'
            a(:href="item.url") some link title: #{item.title}
          else
            p= item.content
    </template>
    
    <script>
      // ...Vue component JS

    Note that since pug natively allows for and if/else if/else blocks with multiple children inside them, but Vue's approach of attaching control logic to individual elements is necessarily singular, if your native pug blocks have multiple children, a template tag will be inserted to transparently make it Vue-friendly, eg:

    if foo == 1
      h1 Hello
      p It's foo!

    Gets translated to:

    template(v-if="foo == 1")
      h1 Hello
      p It's foo!

    Installation

    Note pug is a peer dependency, so make sure to install both:

    npm install -D vue-pug-loader pug

    Usage

    This loader is mostly intended to be used alongside vue-loader v15+, since it now requires using webpack loaders to handle template preprocessors.

    If you are only using this loader for templating in single-file Vue components, simply configure it with:

    {
      module: {
        rules: [
          {
            test: /\.pug$/,
            loader: 'vue-pug-loader'
          }
        ]
      }
    }

    This will apply this loader to all <template lang="pug"> blocks in your Vue components.

    If you also intend to import .pug files as HTML strings in JavaScript for use outside of Vue single file components, you will need to chain raw-loader after either vue-pug-loader (if you still want to transform the pug syntax into Vue syntax) or pug-plain-loader (if you dont want to transform pug syntax into Vue syntax). Note however adding raw-loader would break the output for Vue components, so you need to have two rules, one of them excluding Vue components:

    {
      module: {
        rules: [
          {
            test: /\.pug$/,
            oneOf: [
              // this applies to pug imports inside JavaScript
              {
                exclude: /\.vue$/,
                use: ['raw-loader', 'pug-plain-loader']
              },
              // this applies to <template lang="pug"> in Vue components
              {
                use: ['vue-pug-loader']
              }
            ]
          }
        ]
      }
    }

    Using with Laravel Mix

    You can use vue-pug-loader in Laravel Mix by passing the relevant Webpack rules to Mix's webpackConfig method, eg:

    .webpackConfig({
      module: {
        rules: [
          {
            test: /\.pug$/,
            loader: 'vue-pug-loader',
          }
        ],
      }
    })

    Vue variable interpolation

    You can continue to use Vue-style variable interpolation syntax (eg {{ foo }}) if you wish, but you may also prefer to use pug interpolation syntax instead.

    If you prefer to stick with native pug interpolation syntax, any instance of pug buffered code will get be automatically converted to Vue antlers syntax. For example:

    p= foo

    Will become:

    p {{foo}}

    This also applies to pug string interpolation, for example:

    p some normal text #{foo} hey there

    Will become:

    p some normal text {{foo}} hey there

    Note that for Vue attribute variables you should continue to wrap them in string literals, eg:

    //- correct
    a(:href="someVueVar + '.com'")
    
    //- incorrect
    a(:href=someVueVar + '.com')

    If you use unbuffered code, that will not be transformed, instead it will be left in the code for compile-time. If you want to output a variable from that unbuffered code in your pug template at compile-time, you can use unescaped buffered code and unescaped string interpolation. For example:

    - var unbuffered = 'foo'
    
    p!= unbuffered // <--- will insert 'foo' at compile-time, not dynamically via Vue client-side

    The majority of the time when using pug inside a Vue template, you only really care about Vue data/variables, hence why the more common pug buffered/escaped symbols are transformed into the Vue antlers syntax

    Loops & Vue iteration keys

    As expected, you can manually specify the :key attribute on the child of a for block. For example:

    for item, i in items
      p(:key="i") foo

    However, if you use key as the loop index variable name, :key="key" will automatically be inserted on the looping element. For example:

    for item, key in items
      p foo

    Will translate to:

    p(v-for="(item, key) in items" :key="key") foo

    Any other loop index variable name (eg for item, index..., for item, i... etc) will not add the :key attribute to the looping element.

    Importantly, if a native pug for block has multiple children, since a template wrapper will be automatically inserted, if you are using Vue 3 and need to attach a :key attribute to the inserted template looping element, you should also use key as the name of the loop index variable. For example:

    for item, key in items
      p foo
      p bar

    Will translate to:

    template(v-for="(item, key) in items" :key="key") 
      p foo
      p bar

    If you are using Vue 2 and a pug for block has multiple children, you cannot add :key to a template tag, in which case you should not rely on this automatic behaviour. Instead, manually add the :key attribute to each child element, or use your own wrapper element with something like :key="index" specified. See here for more information on the difference between Vue 2/3 and the handling of the :key attribute on template tags

    Options

    See Pug compiler options.

    The doctype option is set to html by default, since most Vue templates are HTML fragments without explicit doctype.

    An additional option data can be used to pass locals for the template, although this is typically not recommended when using in Vue components.

    Install

    npm i vue-pug-loader

    DownloadsWeekly Downloads

    116

    Version

    1.1.26

    License

    MIT

    Unpacked Size

    9.81 kB

    Total Files

    4

    Last publish

    Collaborators

    • matthewjumpsoffbuildings