Newtonian Particle Motion
Unleash awesomeness. Private packages, team management tools, and powerful integrations. Get started with npm Orgs »

tailwind

3.0.0 • Public • Published

tailwind

tailwind is a base module for streaming and evented CQS applications.

Table of contents

Installation

$ npm install tailwind

Quick start

First you need to add a reference to tailwind to your application:

const tailwind = require('tailwind');

Now you can create an actual application by calling the createApp function. Additionally, you may want to specify the name and the certificate of an identity provider to use. The name has to match the issuer property of the tokens the identity provider issues:

const app = tailwind.createApp({
  identityProvider: {
    name: 'auth.wolkenkit.io',
    certificate: path.join(__dirname, 'certificate.pem')
  }
});

Once you have done all this, whenever you need a reference to the application, just call the app function:

const app = tailwind.app();

Basically, no matter what kind of application you create, the application's structure is always the same: First you configure some I/O ports, then you run custom configuration code, and finally you hand execution over to the run function that has the actual application code.

Enable profiling

If you want to profile your application, additionally provide the profiling options with the host and the port of a StatsD server:

const app = tailwind.createApp({
  profiling: {
    host: 'localhost',
    port: 8125
  }
});

Configuring I/O ports

At the moment, there are four I/O ports available, app.api, app.commandbus, app.eventbus, and app.flowbus. To use them, you need to connect them with wires to protocols and ports. For that use an I/O ports use function and provide a wire instance.

Currently, there are four wires available: app.wires.api.http, app.wires.commandbus.amqp, app.wires.eventbus.amqp, and app.wires.flowbus.amqp. While the first one only provides a generic Server, the latter ones provide a Receiver and a Sender, each.

So, basically, the syntax is as folows:

await app.api.use(new app.wires.api.http.Server({
  // ...
}));

The parameters you have to hand over depend on the actual wire.

Configuring the API server

If you want to create an API I/O port which is based on http you have to use code similar to the following:

await app.api.use(new app.wires.api.http.Server({
  port: 3000,
  corsOrigin: '*',
  writeModel: {
    network: {
      node: {
        commands: { ping: {}},
        events: { pinged: {}}
      }
    }
  },
  readModel: {
    lists: { pings: {}}
  }
}));

The parameters have the following meaning:

  • The port value defines the endpoint of the API.
  • The corsOrigin value can be a string or an array of strings and / or regular expressions containing the domains you want to allow to access your API. If you want your API to be accessible from everywhere, set this value to *.
  • The writeModel and readModel values finally describe the contexts, topics, commands, events and models of your application.

To access the API you basically have two options. You can either access the API manually by calling the appropriate routes, or you can use a ready-made client module such as wolkenkit-client-js.

If you need to get the configuration for the client module yourself, you can access the route /v1/configuration.json.

If you want to check whether the API server is reachable, try to access the /v1/ping route.

Configuring the command bus, the event bus, and the flow bus

Configuring one of the other wires is a little bit simpler. All you need to do is to create a new instance of the requested wire, and set the url of a RabbitMQ instance as well as the name of the application:

await app.commandbus.use(new app.wires.commandbus.amqp.Sender({
  url: 'amqp://admin:admin@localhost:5672',
  application: 'plcr'
}));
 
await app.commandbus.use(new app.wires.commandbus.amqp.Receiver({
  url: 'amqp://admin:admin@localhost:5672',
  application: 'plcr',
  prefetch: 50
}));

Configuring the status server

If you want to create a status I/O port which is based on http you have to use code similar to the following:

await app.status.use(new app.wires.status.http.Server({
  port: 3000,
  corsOrigin: '*'
}));

The parameters have the following meaning:

  • The port value defines the endpoint of the status API.
  • The corsOrigin value can be a string or an array of strings and / or regular expressions containing the domains you want to allow to access your status API. If you want your status API to be accessible from everywhere, set this value to *.

Handling messages

Receiving incoming messages

To handle incoming messages, you need to subscribe to the data event of the incoming stream of the appropriate I/O port. The following example shows how to listen for incoming messages from the API I/O port:

app.api.incoming.on('data', command => {
  // ...
});

When you receive a message from the command bus, the event bus or the flow bus you have to call the message's next function to mark the message as handled:

app.commandbus.incoming.on('data', command => {
  // ...
  command.next();
});

If the message could not be handled successfully, instead of next either call discard to drop the message or call defer to requeue it:

app.commandbus.incoming.on('data', command => {
  // ...
  command.discard(); // or command.defer();
});

Sending outgoing messages

To send data using an I/O port, use its outgoing stream and call the write function:

app.commandbus.outgoing.write({
  // ...
});

Handling stream errors

Each stream of an I/O port provides an error event that you can subscribe to. This allows you to setup custom error handling code:

app.commandbus.outgoing.on('error', err => {
  // ...
});

Handling disconnects

Each stream of an I/O port provides a disconnect event that you can subscribe to. This allows you to setup custom disconnection handling code:

app.commandbus.outgoing.on('disconnect', err => {
  // ...
});

Getting application information

Besides the I/O ports, the app object provides a number of properties and functions you can use within your application.

  • app.name contains your application's name.
  • app.version contains your application's version.
  • app.configuration contains your application's package.json file deserialized into an object.
  • app.dirname contains the name of your application's root directory.
  • app.identityProvider contains an object that provides the identity provider's name and its certificate.

The name and version properties are read from your application's package.json file.

Accessing environment variables

If you need to access environment variables use the app.env function and provide the key of the environment variable you're interested in. If the environment variable is not set, app.env returns undefined, otherwise it returns its value.

If the value is a serialized JSON object, it becomes deserialized automatically, otherwise it gets returned as-is:

const port = app.env('PORT');
// => 3000

Handling configuration data

If you need to store configuration data at runtime, use the app.data object which provides a ready-made datasette instance.

app.data.set('foo', 23);
app.data.get('foo'); // => 23

Using services

Additionally, the app object also provides a number of services that may be used by your application.

  • app.services.bus is a message bus, see draht for details. The get function is automaticalled called internally, so you don't have to create a new instance.
  • app.services.crypto provides functions for encrypting, decrypting, signing and verifying messages, see crypto2 for details.
  • app.services.Datasette is a key-value container, see datasette for details.
  • app.services.Emitter is an event emitter, see draht for details.
  • app.services.getLogger returns a logger, see flaschenpost for details.
  • app.services.Timer is a timer, see timer2 for details.

Exiting an application

To exit an application, call the app.exit function. Optionally you may specify an exit code:

app.exit();

If you want to log an error and exit, use the app.fail function and provide a message and the error as parameter:

app.fail('Application failed.', new Error('...'));

Enabling queries on the server

To enable querying models on the server, you need to provide a function that gets the data from the model and writes them to a stream. For that use the app.api.read hook:

app.api.read = async function (modelType, modelName, options) {
  // options.where
  // options.orderBy
  // options.skip
  // options.take
  // ...
  // return stream;
};

Accessing tailwind using HTTP

Sending commands

To send a command to tailwind, you need to send a POST request to the /v1/command route with the actual command in the request body. To create a command, see the commands-events module.

Receiving events

To receive events from tailwind, you need to send a POST request to the /v1/events route. This then streams events to the client using the JSON Lines format over a long-running http-connection. Inside the client, you may use the json-lines-client module as an easy way to request and parse events.

If you do not want to receive any event, you are also able to filter them. For this provide a filter object within the request body. Then, tailwind will only deliver events to you that match your filter object, i.e. you will get all events that contain the exact same properties and values as the filter object.

Querying models

Clients can query models by using the /v1/read/:modelType/:modelName route with a POST request. The result is streamed to the client using a long-running http connection.

Optionally, you can send a number of query string parameters to specify a filter and similar things.

Specifying where clauses

The where value must be a stringified JSON object encoded with encodeURIComponent. For the object itself, use the following format:

const where = {
  name: 'Jane Doe',
  age: { $greaterThan: 18 }
};

If where is not provided it defaults to {}.

Specifying order by clauses

The orderBy value must be a stringified JSON object encoded with encodeURIComponent. For the object itself, use the following format:

const orderBy = {
  name: 'ascending'
};

If orderBy is not provided it defaults to {}.

Specifying skip clauses

This value must be the number of items to skip. If skip is not provided, it defaults to 0.

Specifying take clauses

This value must be the number of items to return. If take is not provided, it defaults to 100.

Accessing tailwind using web sockets

First you need to establish a web socket connection. For this, connect to the server running the tailwind application using the ws protocol.

All messages that you are going to send must follow a given form. There is always a type property, which specifies the message type, and a procedureId which needs to be set to a uuid in v4 format, so that you can distinguish multiple requests from each other.

Additionally, there is a payload property which contains the actual data to send. If you need to send an authenticated message, you need to add the user's JWT token as an encoded string using the token property.

So, a typical message looks like this:

{
  type: '...',
  procedureId: '42dabca1-6c9b-45d2-8a42-497a25f4c04b',
  payload: {
    // ...
  },
  token: '...'
}

As a response, you will get a similar message back. The response will always have the same procedureId, so that you can connect a response to its request. Additionally, responses have a statusCode property that acts similar to the HTTP status codes.

If there is an error, you will get back a message of type error with an appropriate status code, such as 401 or 500, e.g.

Sending commands

To send a command to tailwind, set the type to sendCommand and provide the actual command as payload. For details on how to create commands, see the commands-events module.

If sending the command succeeded, you will get a response of type sentCommand.

Receiving events

To receive events from tailwind, you need to subscribe to them. For this, set the type to subscribeEvents. You may provide a filter as payload. Then, tailwind will only deliver events to you that match your filter object, i.e. you will get all events that contain the exact same properties and values as the filter object. If you do not have a filter, use an empty object instead.

If subscribing to the events succeeded, you will first get a response of type subscribedEvents, and then a message of type event for each event, with the event's data as payload.

To unsubscribe from events, send a message with type unscubscribeEvents. Once you are unsubscribed, you will get a response of type unsubscribedEvents.

Querying models

Clients can query models by sending a message with type subscribeRead. You need to set the payload to an object that contains the modelType, the modelName, and a query. For details on how to structure the query, see Querying models. If you don't want to provide a query, use an empty object instead.

If reading the model worked, you will first get a response of type subscribedRead, and then a message of type item for each item of the model, with the item's data as payload. Once you are done, you will receive a finish event.

To cancel reading a model before the finish event was sent, send a message with type unsubscribeRead. If this succeeded, you will get a response of type unsubscribedRead.

Running the build

To build this module use roboter.

$ npx roboter

License

Copyright (c) 2014-2018 the native web.

This program is free software: you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the terms of the GNU Affero General Public License as published by the Free Software Foundation, either version 3 of the License, or (at your option) any later version.

This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful, but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. See the GNU Affero General Public License for more details.

You should have received a copy of the GNU Affero General Public License along with this program. If not, see GNU Licenses.

Keywords

none

install

npm i tailwind

Downloadsweekly downloads

243

version

3.0.0

license

AGPL-3.0

homepage

github.com

repository

Gitgithub

last publish

collaborators

  • avatar
  • avatar
  • avatar
  • avatar
Report a vulnerability