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table-resolver

4.1.1 • Public • Published

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table-resolver - Table resolution utilities

Sometimes your rows might come in a nested format or it might have a representation that maps to the underlying value. A name split to first and last parts is an example of the former. Country code to country mapping is an example of the latter.

import * as resolve from 'table-resolver';
 
// Or you can cherry-pick
import { nested } from 'table-resolver';
import { nested as resolveNested } from 'table-resolver';

API

The API consists of two parts: row resolvers and column resolvers. If you have complex data, use the former. Latter come in handy if you have a nested column definition that needs to be flattened so that it works with a component like Reactabular.

Row Resolvers

table-resolver uses an iterator that accepts rows and then transforms it using a specific resolver method (or several, if they have been composed into one).

resolve.resolve

({ columns: <columns>, method: <resolver function>, indexKey = '_index' }) => <rows> => <rows>

The resolve iterator is the heart of this package. It accepts columns and a method. When applied with rows, it will return resolved rows. The method is a function with signature like: ({ column }) => (rowData) => <resolved row>. In most cases, the nested and byFunction methods provided in this package (or a composition of them) will be all you need.

The resolve iterator automatically injects into every resolved row object a field named _index containing the row's index. If method is not provided, _index is injected to the data automatically.

If your own resolver (e.g. byFunction) happens to also output a field named _index, it will overwrite the default one. In that case, if you still need the row index, you may wish to pass a different indexKey when calling resolve.

Note that columns are resolved in order. This means the rowData passed into a custom resolver will contain properties from earlier columns.

Method resolve.nested

({ column }) => (rowData) => <resolved row>

The nested resolver digs rows from a property: 'name.first' kind of definition and maps the received value to property name. It replaces the original value with the resolved one. Note: instead of defining a path string property: 'name.first', you may provide a custom getter function property: data => (data.name || {}).first directly. This may be slightly faster but needs to be done carefully to prevent TypeErrors due to missing values.

This is not intended to be called directly. Pass it as a method to resolve.resolve().

Method creator resolve.byFunction

(path: <string>) => ({ column }) => (rowData) => <resolved row>

The byFunction resolver accepts a path from where to look for a resolving function. It could be column.cell.resolve for example and you can use a nested definition for getting it from your column definition.

Instead of replacing the original value, byFunction generates _<property> kind of field to the resulting rows. This sort of implicit rule is useful for other functionality as it can rely on the same convention.

This is not intended to be called directly. Pass it as a method to resolve.resolve().

Column Resolvers

resolve.columnChildren

({ columns, childrenField = 'children' }) => <resolved columns>

Assuming your column definition is nested, this function resolves it to a flat format.

resolve.headerRows

({ columns, childrenField = 'children' }) => <resolved columns>

If your column definition is nested, you have to resolve it to header rows. resolve.headerRows has been designed exactly for this purpose.

Combining Resolver Methods

You can easily combine resolver methods like this:

const resolver = resolve.resolve({
  columns,
  method: ({ rowData, column }) => resolve.byFunction('cell.resolve')({
    rowData: resolve.nested({ rowData, column }),
    column
  })
});

or if you are already using Redux:

import { compose } from 'redux';
 
...
 
const resolver = resolve.resolve({
  columns,
  method: (extra) => compose(
    resolve.byFunction('cell.resolve')(extra),
    resolve.nested(extra)
  )
});

Resolution Example

The following example shows how you to resolve nested values.

Example:

/*
import * as resolve from 'table-resolver';
*/
 
const columns = [
  {
    property: 'color',
    header: {
      label: 'Color'
    }
  },
  {
    header: {
      label: 'Name'
    },
    children: [
      {
        property: 'name.first',
        header: {
          label: 'First Name'
        }
      },
      {
        property: 'name.last',
        header: {
          label: 'Last Name'
        }
      }
    ]
  },
  {
    header: {
      label: 'About'
    },
    children: [
      {
        property: 'company',
        header: {
          label: 'Company'
        }
      },
      {
        property: 'sentence',
        header: {
          label: 'Sentence'
        }
      }
    ]
  }
];
 
const rows = [
  {
    id: 1,
    color: 'red',
    name: {
      first: 'John',
      last: 'Johnson'
    },
    company: 'John Inc.',
    sentence: 'consequatur nihil minima corporis omnis nihil rem'
  },
  {
    id: 2,
    color: 'blue',
    name: {
      first: 'Mike',
      last: 'Mikeson'
    },
    company: 'Mike Inc.',
    sentence: 'a sequi doloremque sed id quo voluptatem voluptatem ut voluptatibus'
  }
];
 
<ul>{
  resolve.resolve(
    {
      columns: resolve.columnChildren({ columns }),
      method: resolve.nested
    }
  )(rows).map((d, i) =>
    <li key={`value-${i}`}>{JSON.stringify(d, null, 2)}</li>
  )
}</ul>

License

MIT. See LICENSE for details.

install

npm i table-resolver

Downloadsweekly downloads

7,308

version

4.1.1

license

MIT

homepage

github.com

repository

Gitgithub

last publish

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