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Author message:

please consider my new package and stopstop's spiritual successor, 'mews'

stopstop

3.1.1 • Public • Published

stopstop

simple telegram output passer

NPM Build Status

stopstop is like console.log over Telegram messages. Its one function package means you don't need to fumble with a full bot-making api just to send yourself error logs from a script you're too busy to watch all the time. It's named after the way historical telegrams used STOP instead of periods.

stopstop = require('stopstop');
 
stopit = stopstop('<token>', 123456789);
stopit('Meow~');

Passing output

stopstop is a curried function. It expects three parameters, but if you pass it any less than that, it'll give you a new function that takes the rest of the parameters instead of giving you an error. Rather than having to provide all of the parameters at once, you can provide a couple first and save its return value to provide the rest of them later.I'll be referring to these partial functions as stopme and stopit.

// A stopstop that has been given a token is a stopme
stopme = stopstop('<token>');
 
// A stopstop that has been given a token and a chat_id is a stopit
stopit = stopme(123456789);
 
// A stopit sends messages over Telegram
stopit('Telegraphic! ♥');

stopstop(token, chat_id, data[, ...])

This is the fully applied version of stopstop. Passing all three (or more) arguments to stopstop completes a stopstop call, which sends your data over to your specified chat_id from the bot who owns your specified token.

  • token string. Your bot's api token! Your messages will come from the bot this corresponds to.
  • chat_id number. This is where you specify who you want your bot to send messages to.
  • data anything. Just think of this part as the arguments you would pass to console.log and you'll be fine!
  • ... anything. Just like console.log, you can actually pass multiple data arguments and they'll get strung together!
  • returns stopit. You get another stopit back, which means you can actually save the return value from any complete stopstop call to make more stopstop calls with the same settings!

Alternate forms: stopme(chat-id, data[, ...]) stopit(data[, ...])
Similar: stopstop(options, data[, ...])

stopstop(token, chat_id)

This is stopstop without being given output data. You probably actually want to create this version of stopstop at the top of your script, and then call the function it returns just like you usually use console.log. It's probably the best way to use stopstop, so it's what the example at the very top shows!

  • token string. Your bot's api token! Your messages will come from the bot this corresponds to.
  • chat_id number. This is where you specify who you want your bot to send messages to.
  • returns stopit. This gives you a stopit, which is what you use to send messages on Telegram!

Alternate form: stopme(chat-id)
Similar: stopstop(options)

stopstop(token)

This is what happens when you pass stopstop only an api token. It's not as useful as passing it both a token and a chat_id, but it might still have some uses, such as when you have a script that might want to notify multiple people about things.

  • token string. Your bot's api token! Your messages will come from the bot this corresponds to.
  • returns stopme. You can use a stopme to specify what chats you would like your bot to send messages to. Note that you can actually pass both chat_id and data to a stopme at the same time, so creating a stopme doesn't force you to make three function calls.

More options

You may find stopstop's default configuration a little limiting. After all, it doesn't really give you much control over formatting or other options. That's because I wanted to keep things simple, but thanks to curry magic, stopstop has an alternate form that does give you more choices!

stopit = stopstop({
  token: '<token>',
  params: {
    chat_id: 123456789,
    parse_mode: 'markdown'
  }
});
stopit("Well, who's being **a little bold** now?");

stopstop(options, data[, ...])

You'll notice that options, an object, is completely different from the string token that stopstop's other form expects as a first parameter. That's how stopstop knows which version you want. As far as stopstop is concerned, providing an options object replaces the first two parameters of its other form. There isn't any difference beyond that.

  • options object. Make choices about what you want stopstop to do! Everything that doesn't say required is optional.
    • token required string. Your bot's api token! Your messages will come from the bot this corresponds to.
    • params object. This object is passed directly to Telegram's bot API as request parameters, so you probably wannya look at their sendMessage reference for more details.
      • chat_id required number. This is where you specify who you want your bot to send messages to.
      • text nothing. While you can set a text parameter and stopstop won't throw an error, there's no point in doing so because it'll get overwritten.
    • prefix string. If you set this to a string, it'll get added to the beginning of all of your messages. If you don't set it to anything, nothing will get added.
    • suffix string. If you set this to a string, it'll get added to the end of all of your messages. If you don't set it to anything, nothing will get added.
  • data anything. Just think of this part as the arguments you would pass to console.log and you'll be fine!
  • ... anything. Just like console.log, you can actually pass multiple data arguments and they'll get strung together!
  • returns stopit. You get another stopit back, which means you can actually save the return value from any complete stopstop call to make more stopstop calls with the same settings!

Similar: stopstop(token, chat_id, data[, ...])

stopstop(options)

Just like the other form of stopstop, you can curry this form too! Since it only takes two parameters it's a lot less exciting, but you probably wannya set options and send messages as separate steps, so it's still pretty important. Note that while parameters are curried, options are not. Giving stopstop options that do not contain both a token and a params.chat_id will throw an error.

  • options object. Make choices about what you want stopstop to do!
  • returns stopit. This gives you a stopit, which is what you use to send messages on Telegram!

Similar: stopstop(token, chat_id)

stopit.now(options)

Changed your mind about what you wanted your stopit's options to be but you don't wannya start over? Change them with this! Remember that it returns an entirely new stopit without modifying your old one, so save its return value!

  • options object. Make choices about what you want stopstop to do!
  • returns stopit. This gives you a stopit, which is what you use to send messages on Telegram!
stopit = stopstop('<token>', 123456789).now({
  prefix: 'SUPER IMPORTANT ALERT:\n\n',
  suffix: '\n\nThis message was brought to you by stopstop.'
});
stopit('I think I get it now!');

Making a bot and finding your chat id

Before you can start using stopstop, you will need a Telegram bot and the chat ids of the chat you wish to have your bot notify.

Getting a telegram bot's api token

This part is easy. Just talk to BotFather and follow his directions for making a new bot. He'll give you an api key and you'll be good to go. If you already have a bot and you forgot its api token, BotFather can help you with that as well. Yay!

Getting your chat id

This is a little harder, and requires a bit of manual API work.

  1. Send your Telegram bot a message. If you can't think of anything, /start actually counts as a message for this step, so you're probably already good to go.

  2. Navigate to this url in your browser (an api request tester of your choice), replacing <token> with your bot's api token.

    https://api.telegram.org/bot<token>/getUpdates
    
  3. If you're familiar with json, you'll find a couple objects containing your user details, including an id parameter. That's your chat id! If you're not familiar with json, just use your browser's search feature to search for your username, your name on Telegram, or even the message you sent your bot. Inside that tangle of brackets, you should be able to find a "id": some-number field that's pretty close to the rest of your user data. That's what you're looking for.

    "from"{
      "id": 123456789,
      "first_name": "Your",
      "last_name": "Name",
      "username": "YourUsername"
    }

More examples

You can send all sorts of things with stopstop!

stopit = stopstop('<token>')(123456789)('Oh, for the love of curry!');
 
stopit('meow')('nyaa')('purr');
stopit('multiple', 'parameters', '!!');
stopit(/lots of options/);
stopit(Math.floor(100000000 * Math.random()));
stopit({objects: 'and'}, ['arrays'], {both: ['at', 'once', '?!']});
stopit(function() {return 'When would you ever need to log a function?';});
stopit('stopstop uses %s on its parameters.', 'util.format');
stopit(undefined);
stopit();

install

npm i stopstop

Downloadsweekly downloads

12

version

3.1.1

license

ISC

homepage

github.com

repository

Gitgithub

last publish

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