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sreda

0.0.3-dev • Public • Published

sreda Codeship Status for igorkosta/sreda npm version

What would you use sreda for?

There is a very nice article by Yan Cui that explains very well, why you should use AWS SSM/KMS and also why you should build your own client to do so.

There is a couple of reasons for your own implementation:

  • caching
  • hot-swapping of configurations

You can find more about it in Yan's article on medium.

sreda takes the inspiration from the Yan's medium article and this gist from Aaron Ackerman, which was probably also inspired by Yan Cui and packs it all into an npm package.

How to use?

sreda exposes two functions:

  • load - loads the configuration
  • keys - returns a json object with your key/value pairs

Load the configuration

If you want to load the configuration for certain keys from SSM, you have to:

const { read } = require('sreda')
const AWS = require('aws-sdk')
const ssm = new AWS.SSM({
  region: 'us-west-1'
})
 
const config = read(
  ssm,
  ['foo', 'bar'],
  30000) // cache configuration for 30 seconds
 
const anotherConfig = read(
  ssm,
  ['fizz', 'buzz']) // default cache expiration is 3 minutes
 
exports.handler = async (event, context, callback) => {
  let keys = {
    foo: await config.keys.foo,
    bar: await config.keys.bar,
    fizz: await anotherConfig.keys.fizz,
    buzz: await anotherConfig.keys.buzz
  }
 
  const response = {
    statusCode: 200,
    body: JSON.stringify({
      message: `SSM Keys`,
      keys
    })
  }
  callback(null, response)
}

Alternatively you can make use of the keys function that return a json object with key/value pairs of your ssm keys, e.g.

const { keys } = require('sreda')
const AWS = require('aws-sdk')
const ssm = new AWS.SSM({
  region: 'us-west-1'
})
 
exports.handler = async (event, context, callback) => {
  let keys = await keys(ssm, ['foo', 'bar'])
 
  const response = {
    statusCode: 200,
    body: JSON.stringify({
      message: `SSM Keys`,
      keys
    })
  }
  callback(null, response)
}

SSM and iamRoleStatements

In order for your lambda function to access the SSM it has to:

  • have access to the internet
  • have rights to get the parameters from SSM

To allow your lambda function to access SSM you have to put similar iamRoleStatements section into your provider block

Please note, in order to be able to use CloudFormation Pseudo Parameters, like ${AWS::Region} and ${AWS::AccountId} you have to use a variableSyntax parameter with the value you see in the example below and you should use 'Fn::Sub' when assembling your Resource

provider:
  name: aws
  runtime: nodejs8.10
  variableSyntax: "\\${((?!AWS)[ ~:a-zA-Z0-9._'\",\\-\\/\\(\\)]+?)}"
  iamRoleStatements:
    Effect: 'Allow'
      Action: 'ssm:GetParameters'
      Resource:
        'Fn::Sub': 'arn:aws:ssm:${AWS::Region}:${AWS::AccountId}:parameter/*'
    Effect: 'Allow'
      Action: 'kms:Decrypt'
      Resource:
        'Fn::Sub': 'arn:aws:kms:us-east-1:${AWS::AccountId}:key/<your-kms-key>'

Through the iamRoleStatements you can also granulary manage the access of your lambda function to SSM

provider:
  name: aws
  runtime: nodejs8.10
  variableSyntax: "\\${((?!AWS)[ ~:a-zA-Z0-9._'\",\\-\\/\\(\\)]+?)}"
  iamRoleStatements:
    Effect: 'Allow'
      Action: 'ssm:GetParameters'
      Resource:
        'Fn::Sub':
          'arn:aws:ssm:${AWS::Region}:${AWS::AccountId}:parameter/foo'
        'Fn::Sub':
          'arn:aws:ssm:${AWS::Region}:${AWS::AccountId}:parameter/bar'
    Effect: 'Allow'
      Action: 'kms:Decrypt'
      Resource:
        'Fn::Sub': 'arn:aws:kms:us-east-1:${AWS::AccountId}:key/<your-kms-key>'

Developing locally

If you use sreda while developing locally, you can set process.env.NODE_ENV = 'local' and use the environment variables set in process.env.

Install

npm i sreda

DownloadsWeekly Downloads

8

Version

0.0.3-dev

License

MIT

Unpacked Size

9.05 kB

Total Files

6

Last publish

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