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redux-pipeline

1.0.5 • Public • Published

Redux Pipeline Build Status

Run Redux Reducers Together.

NPM

http://redux-pipeline.mediadrake.com/

Installation

% npm install redux-pipeline

Usage

Redux pipeline combines reducers into a single, manageable sequence.

MyStore.js

import { createStore } from 'redux';
import pipeline from 'redux-pipeline';
 
function addReducer(state = 0, action) {
    switch(action.type) {
        case 'ADD':
            return state + action.data;
        default:
            return state;
    }
}
 
function subtractReducer(state = 0, action) {
    switch(action.type) {
        case 'SUBTRACT':
            return state - action.data;
        default:
            return state;
    }
}
 
export default createStore(
  pipeline(addReducer, subtractReducer)
);

Then just call actions like normal!

MyActions.js

import store from './MyStore'
 
const {dispatch, subscribe, getState} = store;
 
subscribe(val => console.log('State is:', getState()));
 
dispatch({
    type: 'ADD',
    data: 2
});
// State is: 2
 
dispatch({
    type: 'SUBTRACT',
    data: 10
});
// State is: -8

With Reducify

The above reducers can actually be a whole lot shorter.

import { createStore } from 'redux';
import pipeline from 'redux-pipeline';
 
export default createStore(
  pipeline(
    {"ADD": (state = 0, action) => state + action.data}, 
    {"SUBTRACT": (state = 0, action) => state - action.data}}
  )
);

This is courtesy of Reducify. Head over to their documentation and check out all the ways you can make reducers. Any argument you pass to pipeline gets automatically passed to reducify.

Note! We do have one big change between the API for Reducify and Redux Pipeline - arrays will get parsed like this:

[[select, merge], reducer]

Notice we're not pulling a default value from the array! Use an earlier step in the pipeline for that.

import pipeline from 'redux-pipeline';
 
 
function reducer1(state = 0, action) {
    // ...
}
 
function reducer2(state = 0, action) {
    // ...
}
 
// Works
export default createStore(
  pipeline(
    {paramOne: 1},
    ['paramOne', reducer1], 
    [state => state.paramTwo, (result, state) => ({...state, paramTwo: result}), reducer: reducer2]
  )
);
 
// Does not work
export default createStore(
  pipeline(    
    [{paramOne: 1}, 'paramOne', reducer1], 
    [state => state.paramTwo, (result, state) => ({...state, paramTwo: result}), reducer: reducer2]
  )
);

Defaults

Just pass it in instead of a reducer. They'll turn into a reducify static reducer and you can keep on going.

import { createStore } from 'redux';
import pipeline from 'redux-pipeline';
 
function mathReducer(state = 0, action) {
    // ...
}
 
function toggleReducer(state = false, action) {
    // ...
}
 
const store = createStore(
  pipeline(
    {myNumber: 0, myBoolean: false}, // Just pass in an object - this will be your default state
    {select: 'myNumber', reducer: mathReducer},
    {select: 'myBoolean', reducer: toggleReducer}
  )
);
 
store.dispatch({
   type: 'ADD',
   data: 10
});
 
store.dispatch({
   type: 'TOGGLE'
});
 
// State is: {myNumber: 10, myBoolean: true}

Nesting

Because we're just making reducers, you're free to do pipe all the way down!

import { createStore } from 'redux';
import pipeline from 'redux-pipeline';
 
function mathReducer(state = 0, action) {
    // ...
}
 
function toggleReducer(state = false, action) {
    // ...
}
 
const store = createStore(
  pipeline(
    {data: {}, otherData: {}},
    {select: 'data', reducer: pipeline(
        {select: 'myNumber', reducer: mathReducer},
        {select: 'myBoolean', reducer: toggleReducer}
    )},
    // you can use the same shortcuts when you nest
    // this is pretty much the same thing
    ['otherData', pipeline(
        ['myNumber', mathReducer],
        ['myBoolean', toggleReducer],
    )]
  )
);
 
store.dispatch({
   type: 'ADD',
   data: 10
});
 
store.dispatch({
   type: 'TOGGLE'
});
 
/* 
State is:
{
    data: {myNumber: 10, myBoolean: true},
    otherData: {myNumber: 10, myBoolean: true}
}
*/

Generic Reducers

Not something you absolutely need this package for, but it makes this pattern a whole lot easier.

import { createStore } from 'redux';
import pipeline from 'redux-pipeline';
 
function genericMathReducer({add, subtract}) {
    return (state = 0, action) => {
        switch(action.type) {
            case add:
                return state + action.data;
            case subtract:
                return state - action.data;
            default:
                return state;
        }        
    };    
}
 
const store = createStore(
  pipeline(
    {myNumber: 0, myOtherNumber: 0}, 
    ['myNumber', genericMathReducer({add: 'ADD_NUMBER', subtract: 'SUBTRACT_NUMBER'})],
    ['myOtherNumber', genericMathReducer({add: 'ADD_OTHER_NUMBER', subtract: 'SUBTRACT_OTHER_NUMBER'})]
  )
);
 
store.dispatch({
   type: 'ADD_NUMBER',
   data: 10
});
 
store.dispatch({
   type: 'SUBTRACT_OTHER_NUMBER',
   data: 5
});
 
// State is: {myNumber: 10, myOtherNumber: -5}

Pipe

Injected as the third argument into every reducer in the chain. <pipe> is an object with basic control flow methods.

Important! Make sure that you pass in your resulting state to any pipe methods you call. You must also return the method itself. Reducers are synchronous, we plan on keeping them that way.

End

You might want to stop the flow of the reducer chain. This is especially true if you create a generic configurable reducer but want to surpress some actions.

import pipeline from 'redux-pipeline';
 
function blockSubtract(state = 0, action, pipe) {
    switch(action.type) {        
        case "SUBTRACT":
            // Notice we're passing state to the end method
            return pipe.end(state);
        default:
            return state;
    }
}
 
// Math reducer would come from a library or something
function mathReducer(state = 0, action) {
    switch(action.type) {
        case "ADD":
            return state + action.data;
        case "SUBTRACT":
            return state - action.data;
        default:
            return state;
    }
}
 
const store = createStore(
  pipeline(
    blockSubtract, 
    mathReducer
  )
);
 
store.dispatch({
   type: 'ADD',
   data: 10
});
 
// This gets blocked
store.dispatch({
   type: 'SUBTRACT',
   data: 5
});
 
// State is: 10

Order matters! If you put an interrupting reducer last, it won't change anything about the final output.

Skip

skip([state, [count = 1]])

Skips the next reducer in the pipeline.

import pipeline from 'redux-pipeline';
 
function skipSubtract(state = 0, action, pipe) {
    switch(action.type) {        
        case "SUBTRACT":
            // Notice we're passing state to the end method
            return pipe.skip(state);
        default:
            return state;
    }
}
 
 
function mathReducer(state = 0, action) {
    switch(action.type) {        
        case "SUBTRACT":
            return state - action.data;
        default:
            return state;
    }
}
 
// We'll get the multiplied subtraction instead
function mathReducer2(state = 0, action) {
    switch(action.type) {        
        case "SUBTRACT":
            return state - action.data * 2;
        default:
            return state;
    }
}
 
const store = createStore(
  pipeline(
    skipSubtract, 
    mathReducer,
    mathReducer2
  )
);
 
store.dispatch({
   type: 'SUBTRACT',
   data: 5
});
 
// State is: -10

Mutate Action

mutateAction([mutation, [state]])

Mutates the action for the rest of the pipeline. This is not a control flow method. If you do not pass state, action will return pipe. Otherwise you must return the method result and pass in state.

import pipeline from 'redux-pipeline';
 
function incrementEnhancer(state = 0, action, pipe) {
    switch(action.type) {        
        case "INCREMENT":            
            return pipe.mutateAction({data: 2}, state);
        default:
            return state;
    }
}
 
 
function increment(state = 0, action) {
    switch(action.type) {        
        case "INCREMENT":
            return state + action.data;
        default:
            return state;
    }
}
 
 
const store = createStore(
  pipeline(
    incrementEnhancer, 
    increment
  )
);
 
store.dispatch({
   type: 'INCREMENT'
});
 
// State is: 2

You can chain this together if you do not pass a state result.

import pipeline from 'redux-pipeline';
 
function incrementEnhancer(state = 0, action, pipe) {
    switch(action.type) {        
        case "INCREMENT":            
            return pipe.mutateAction({data: 2}).skip(state);
        default:
            return state;
    }
}
 
function incrementSkipThis(state = 0, action) {
    switch(action.type) {        
        case "INCREMENT":
            throw 'This reducer should not be used';
        default:
            return state;
    }
}
 
function increment(state = 0, action) {
    switch(action.type) {        
        case "INCREMENT":
            return state + action.data;
        default:
            return state;
    }
}
 
 
const store = createStore(
  pipeline(
    incrementEnhancer,
    incrementSkipThis,
    increment
  )
);
 
store.dispatch({
   type: 'INCREMENT'
});
 
// State is: 2

API

pipeline

import pipeline from 'redux-pipeline';
pipeline([steps ...]);

Defaults

pipeline([<Object>...]); // identical to (state = <Object>) => state

Adding that root reducer just for a default seemed kind of excessive, so if you pass in an object that doesn't match a config signature, we'll use it as a default.

import pipeline from 'redux-pipeline';
 
function reducer1(state = 0, action) {
    // ...
}
 
function reducer2(state = 0, action) {
    // ...
}
 
export default createStore(
  pipeline(
    {foo: 'bar'},
    ['paramOne', reducer1], 
    [state => state.paramTwo, (result, state) => ({...state, paramTwo: result}), reducer: reducer2]
  )
);
// State is: {paramOne<Number>, paramTwo<Number>, foo: 'bar'}

debugPipeline

import {debugPipeline} from 'redux-pipeline';
pipeline([steps ...]);

Same as the default pipeline function, just with a lot of console noise.

Credits

Redux Pipeline is free software under the MIT license. It was created in sunny Santa Monica by Matthew Drake.

install

npm i redux-pipeline

Downloadsweekly downloads

0

version

1.0.5

license

MIT

homepage

github.com

repository

Gitgithub

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