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    react-router-routes

    1.0.4 • Public • Published

    React Router Routes

    ** This is a fork of react-router-config.

    ** Replace all instances of react-router-config or ReactRouterConfig with react-router-routes or ReactRouterRoutes

    ** Or use react-router-config itself if/when this PR gets merged

    Static route configuration helpers for React Router.

    This is alpha software, it needs:

    1. Realistic server rendering example with data preloading
    2. Pending navigation example

    Installation

    Using npm:

    $ npm install --save react-router-config
    

    Then with a module bundler like webpack, use as you would anything else:

    // using an ES6 transpiler, like babel
    import { matchRoutes, renderRoutes } from "react-router-config";
     
    // not using an ES6 transpiler
    var matchRoutes = require("react-router-config").matchRoutes;

    The UMD build is also available on unpkg:

    <script src="https://unpkg.com/react-router-config/umd/react-router-config.min.js"></script>

    You can find the library on window.ReactRouterConfig

    Motivation

    With the introduction of React Router v4, there is no longer a centralized route configuration. There are some use-cases where it is valuable to know about all the app's potential routes such as:

    • Loading data on the server or in the lifecycle before rendering the next screen
    • Linking to routes by name
    • Static analysis

    This project seeks to define a shared format for others to build patterns on top of.

    Route Configuration Shape

    Routes are objects with the same properties as a <Route> with a couple differences:

    • the only render prop it accepts is component (no render or children)
    • accepts key prop to prevent remounting component when transition was made from route with the same component and same key prop
    • introduces the routes key for sub routes
    • introduces the redirect key which can be a path that should be redirected to (with parameter matching) when the route is matched
    • introduces the props and forcedProps keys, which can be used for convenience to pass props from the route configuration into the route component
    • Consumers are free to add any additional props they'd like to a route
    • The route is passed as a prop to the component (prop name configurable)
    • A convenience renderChild function is passed as a prop to the component (prop name configurable).
    const routes = [
      {
        component: Root,
        routes: [
          {
            path: "/",
            exact: true,
            component: Home
          },
          {
            path: "/child/:id",
            component: Child,
            routes: [
              {
                path: "/child/:id/grand-child",
                component: GrandChild
              }
            ]
          }
        ]
      }
    ];

    Note: Just like <Route>, relative paths are not (yet) supported. When it is supported there, it will be supported here.

    API

    matchRoutes(routes, pathname)

    Returns an array of matched routes.

    Parameters

    • routes - the route configuration
    • pathname - the pathname component of the url. This must be a decoded string representing the path.
    import { matchRoutes } from "react-router-config";
    const branch = matchRoutes(routes, "/child/23");
    // using the routes shown earlier, this returns
    // [
    //   routes[0],
    //   routes[0].routes[1]
    // ]

    Each item in the array contains two properties: routes and match.

    • routes: A reference to the routes array used to match
    • match: The match object that also gets passed to <Route> render methods.
    branch[0].match.url;
    branch[0].match.isExact;
    // etc.

    You can use this branch of routes to figure out what is going to be rendered before it actually is rendered. You could do something like this on the server before rendering, or in a lifecycle hook of a component that wraps your entire app

    const loadBranchData = (location) => {
      const branch = matchRoutes(routes, location.pathname)
     
      const promises = branch.map(({ route, match }) => {
        return route.loadData
          ? route.loadData(match)
          : Promise.resolve(null)
      })
     
      return Promise.all(promises)
    }
     
    // useful on the server for preloading data
    loadBranchData(req.url).then(data => {
      putTheDataSomewhereTheClientCanFindIt(data)
    })
     
    // also useful on the client for "pending navigation" where you
    // load up all the data before rendering the next page when
    // the url changes
     
    // THIS IS JUST SOME THEORETICAL PSEUDO CODE :)
    class PendingNavDataLoader extends Component {
      state = {
        previousLocation: null
      }
     
      componentWillReceiveProps(nextProps) {
        const navigated = nextProps.location !== this.props.location
        const { routes } = this.props
     
        if (navigated) {
          // save the location so we can render the old screen
          this.setState({
            previousLocation: this.props.location
          })
     
          // load data while the old screen remains
          loadNextData(routes, nextProps.location).then((data) => {
            putTheDataSomewhereRoutesCanFindIt(data)
            // clear previousLocation so the next screen renders
            this.setState({
              previousLocation: null
            })
          })
        }
      }
     
      render() {
        const { children, location } = this.props
        const { previousLocation } = this.state
     
        // use a controlled <Route> to trick all descendants into
        // rendering the old location
        return (
          <Route
            location={previousLocation || location}
            render={() => children}
          />
        )
      }
    }
     
    // wrap in withRouter
    export default withRouter(PendingNavDataLoader)
     
    /////////////
    // somewhere at the top of your app
    import routes from './routes'
     
    <BrowserRouter>
      <PendingNavDataLoader routes={routes}>
        {renderRoutes(routes)}
      </PendingNavDataLoader>
    </BrowserRouter>

    Again, that's all pseudo-code. There are a lot of ways to do server rendering with data and pending navigation and we haven't settled on one. The point here is that matchRoutes gives you a chance to match statically outside of the render lifecycle. We'd like to make a demo app of this approach eventually.

    renderRoutes(routes, { extraProps = {}, switchProps = {}, routeProp = 'route', renderChildProp = 'renderChild' } = {})

    In order to ensure that matching outside of render with matchRoutes and inside of render result in the same branch, you must use renderRoutes or renderChild instead of <Route> inside your components. You can render a <Route> still, but know that it will not be accounted for in matchRoutes outside of render.

    import { renderRoutes } from "react-router-config";
     
    const routes = [
      {
        component: Root,
        routes: [
          {
            path: "/",
            exact: true,
            component: Home
          },
          {
            path: "/other:id",
            redirect: "/child:id"
          },
          {
            path: "/child/:id",
            component: Child,
            props: {
              className: "child-css-class"
            },
            routes: [
              {
                path: "/child/:id/grand-child",
                component: GrandChild
              }
            ]
          }
        ]
      }
    ];
     
    const Root = ({ route }) => (
      <div>
        <h1>Root</h1>
        {/* child routes won't render without this */}
        {renderRoutes(route.routes)}
      </div>
    );
     
    const Home = ({ route }) => (
      <div>
        <h2>Home</h2>
      </div>
    );
     
    const Child = ({ route }) => (
      <div>
        <h2>Child</h2>
        {/* child routes won't render without this */}
        {renderRoutes(route.routes, { someProp: "these extra props are optional" })}
      </div>
    );
     
    const GrandChild = ({ someProp }) => (
      <div>
        <h3>Grand Child</h3>
        <div>{someProp}</div>
      </div>
    );
     
    ReactDOM.render(
      <BrowserRouter>
        {/* kick it all off with the root route */}
        {renderRoutes(routes)}
      </BrowserRouter>,
      document.getElementById("root")
    );

    Or you can update the above examples to use props.renderChild which eleminates the need to import the renderRoutes function

    const Root = ({ renderChild }) => (
      <div>
        <h1>Root</h1>
        {/* child routes won't render without this */}
        {renderChild()}
      </div>
    );
     
    const Home = ({ route, renderChild }) => (
      <div>
        <h2>Home</h2>
      </div>
    );
     
    const Child = ({ renderChild }) => (
      <div>
        <h2>Child</h2>
        {/* child routes won't render without this */}
        {renderChild({ someProp: "these extra props are optional" })}
      </div>
    );
     
    const GrandChild = ({ someProp }) => (
      <div>
        <h3>Grand Child</h3>
        <div>{someProp}</div>
      </div>
    );

    Route Component Prop Order

    When route components are rendered they are passed a collection of props that are merged in a specific order.

    The are route keys that allow you to control this merge order.

    • Use route.props for props that should be overriden by props passed to the component
    • Use route.forcedProps for props that should override any props passed to the component

    This merge order is important if you are trying to do something like the following:

    const routes = [
      {
        props: {
          className: 'the-app-theme'
        },
        routes: [
          {
            path: '/abc',
            routes: [
              {
                props: {
                  className: 'the-abc-theme' // will always be overriden by 'the-app-theme'
                }
              }
            ]
          }
        ]
      }
    ];
    

    You need to instead do the following for the className to be correctly applied:

    const routes = [
      {
        props: {
          className: 'the-app-theme'
        },
        routes: [
          {
            path: '/abc',
            routes: [
              {
                forcedProps: {
                  className: 'the-abc-theme' // will override 'the-app-theme'
                }
              }
            ]
          }
        ]
      }
    ];
    

    The following illustrates the merge order of route component props:

    function renderRoutes(routes, { extraProps, routeProp = 'route', renderChildProp = 'renderChild' }) {
      return routes.map(route =>
        props => {
          ...route.props,
          ...props,
          ...extraProps,
          [routeProp] = route,
          [renderChildProp] = props => renderRoutes(route.routes, ( { extraProps: props }),
          ...route.forcedProps
        }
      )
    }

    Install

    npm i react-router-routes

    DownloadsWeekly Downloads

    4

    Version

    1.0.4

    License

    MIT

    Unpacked Size

    158 kB

    Total Files

    17

    Last publish

    Collaborators

    • jharris4