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    react-batch-n-cache

    0.2.0 • Public • Published

    React Batch 'n Cache.

    A library component for batching and catching asynchronous API queries. Inspired by DataLoader and Apollo Client.

    npm version Build Status

    Overview

    This library exports a generating function createLoader, which generates a Provider Component, a Consumer Component, and an equivalent Hook, linked to the provider by React Context. The Provider accepts a fetch prop which takes an asynchronous function loading a batch of data from a set of values. When a set of Consumers components or components using the Hook are rendered below the provider in the tree, the batch-loading function is triggered with the values requested by the consumers. The Provider automatically de-duplicates requests, avoids requesting the same data multiple times, and batches requests made within a short time period into a single HTTP request. The consumers re-render with the respective data when the request is complete, with the loading state if the network request is in progress, and with the error state if the network request has failed.

    Example Usage

    import { createLoader, BnCStatus } from 'react-batch-n-cache';
    const { BnCProvider, BnC, useBnC } = createLoader();
     
    // Using the Provider
    const App = () => (
      <BnCProvider
        throttle={10}
        fetch={ids => fetchFromAPI(ids).then(res => res.data)}
        retry={{ delay: 'exponential', max: 5 }}
      >
        <Consumer />
        <ConsumerWithHook />
      </BnCProvider>
    );
     
    // Using the Consumer Component
    const Consumer = () => (
      <BnC values={['item-a-id', 'item-b-id', 'item-c-id']}>
        {({ status, data, retry }) => {
          if (status === BnCStatus.LOADING) {
            return <span>Loading...</span>;
          }
          if (status === BnCStatus.ERROR) {
            return (
              <div className="error">
                Something went wrong.
                <button onClick={() => retry()}>Retry</button>
              </div>
            );
          }
          const [itemA, itemB, itemC] = data;
     
          return (
            <ul>
              <li>{itemA}</li>
              <li>{itemB}</li>
              <li>{itemC}</li>
            </ul>
          );
        }}
      </BnC>
    );
     
    // Using the Hook
    const ConsumerWithHook = () => {
      const { status, data, retry } = useBnC([
        'item-a-id',
        'item-b-id',
        'item-c-id',
      ]);
      if (status === BnCStatus.LOADING) {
        return <span>Loading...</span>;
      }
      if (status === BnCStatus.ERROR) {
        return (
          <div className="error">
            Something went wrong.
            <button onClick={() => retry()}>Retry</button>
          </div>
        );
      }
      const [itemA, itemB, itemC] = data;
     
      return (
        <ul>
          <li>{itemA}</li>
          <li>{itemB}</li>
          <li>{itemC}</li>
        </ul>
      );
    };

    Motivation

    The aim of this library is to provide a simple-to-use state-managing component that covers a good range of simple and common use cases for client-side data-fetching, and to implement this in a declarative manner using React.

    The primary inspiration for this component is the Query React component in the React Apollo library for Apollo Client. The following example component is given in the React Apollo documentation:

    const Feed = () => (
      <Query query={GET_DOGS}>
        {({ loading, error, data }) => {
          if (error) return <Error />;
          if (loading || !data) return <Fetching />;
     
          return <DogList dogs={data.dogs} />;
        }}
      </Query>
    );

    This declarative approach to data-fetching makes the Apollo Client library very easy to use. This component only needs to specify the GraphQL query being performed, and the API request is performed when the component is mounted. The actual details of how to perform the API request is abstracted away to a Provider component, which is rendered higher up the React tree, and connects to the Query component via React Context.

    The Query component uses the render props pattern, which is a great way to decouple state-managing components from DOM element-rendering UI components. Here, the Query component is re-rendered when the data, loading, or error states are updated, and the function-as-child is called with this new data. This makes it easy to implement components to consume the data, and to implement spinners or retry buttons on network failure. In addition, Apollo Client internally caches component queries, preventing unnecessary requests being made if a component is unmounted and remounted.

    However, Apollo Client is first-and-foremost designed for use with a GraphQL endpoint. While it is possible to use Apollo Client with REST endpoints, all client-side queries still need to be GraphQL, and so an understanding of GraphQL schemas, types, and directives is needed. In many cases, this can be overkill. GraphQL was designed as a way to visualise and query vast networks of interconnected data, but not all data sources are this complex. Sometimes, it's enough to just fetch a set of data of a single type from a single endpoint.

    Another source of inspiration for this library is the DataLoader library. This library allows you to create loaders, which are functions which collate all calls made to them within a single tick of the JavaScript event loop, and make a single batch call to another function. In the context of remote requests, these can be used to collate multiple independent calls into a single request. Loaders also implement a simple memoisation cache to reduce unnecessary remote requests. This library was designed for use on the server- side, for consolidating and removing repetition from GraphQL queries, reducing the load on different backing services.

    This approach can be useful for reducing HTTP requests made on the client-side, too. By collating distinct queries triggered when different data-requiring components are rendered, and removing duplicate requests when multiple components with the same data requirements are mounted, the number of API requests can be dramatically reduced. (And yes, there is an Apollo Client link that does this.)

    API

    createLoader

    A function that generates a React Batch 'n Cache Provider component class, BnCProvider, a Consumer component class BnC, and a Hook useBnC.

    import { createLoader } from 'react-batch-n-cache';
    const { BnCProvider, BnC, useBnC } = createLoader();

    <BnCProvider>

    A component that controls the remote data requesting, consolidating, and caching.

    Props
    • fetch: Array<String> => Promise<Array<Any>>: When at least one BnC component is rendered below this component in the render tree, the fetch prop will be called with an array of the IDs given as props to the Consumer components. The function given to the fetch prop should generate a promise which resolves to an array containing the remotely-fetched data in the same order as the IDs in the argument.
    • throttle: Number?: The time in milliseconds to wait between BnC components being rendered in the tree before triggering a fetch request. Defaults to 0.
    • retry: { delay?: <number> | 'exponential', max?: <number> }: this prop specifies how to attempt to retry the fetch callback if the promise is rejected. The value of retry.delay can be a number of milliseconds to wait between requests, or 'exponential' to make the delay time double after each request attempt. The request will be re-attempted up to retry.max times. Retries can also be triggered manually in the retry prop of the BnC consumer component. Defaults to { delay: 'exponential', max: 25 }.

    <BnC>

    A component that declares the IDs of the remote data it requires, and uses this via a render prop with loading and error states.

    Props
    • ids: Array<String>: An array of string values representing the IDs of the data that the component needs to request from the remote data source before rendering. These will be called as the argument to the fetch prop of the BnCProvider above the component in the tree, along with any other values from other BnC components mounted at a similar time.
    • children: { data, status, retry } => React.Node: A render prop for determining how to render the fetched data. The render prop is called with a single argument with the following keys:
      • data: <Array<Any>>: an array where the entries are the fetched values of the data, in the same order as the values prop. Entries corresponding to data that has not yet loaded or failed to load will be undefined. The data will be available if it was fetched and cached by another BnC component mount.
      • status: BnCStatus.LOADING | BnCStatus.ERROR | BnCStatus.COMPLETE: reports the status of any request to fetch the data in values. This can be used to generate loading and error states of the component.
      • retry: () => void: A function to manually trigger another request of missing data. Retries will also be called by the configuration set in the retry prop for BnCProvider.

    useBnC

    A React Hook version of the consumer component, with signature

    (values: Array<String>) => ({ data: <Array<Any>>, status: <BnCStatus>, retry: () => void })
     

    The return value of the Hook has the same form as the render prop arguments of the Consumer component.

    BnCStatus

    import { BnCStatus } from 'react-batch-n-cache';

    An object with the keys LOADING, COMPLETE, and ERRORED. The status key in the argument of the BnC component's render prop and in the return value of the useBnC Hook will always be called with one of these values.

    Releasing

    Releases to NPM are performed via Travis when tagged commits are pushed to the repo. Create a new tagged commit and bump the version in package.json with:

    npm version patch

    and push the new commits and tags with:

    git push && git push --tags

    Keywords

    none

    Install

    npm i react-batch-n-cache

    DownloadsWeekly Downloads

    6

    Version

    0.2.0

    License

    MIT

    Unpacked Size

    28 kB

    Total Files

    9

    Last publish

    Collaborators

    • dprgarner