raptor-args

A concise command line arguments parser with robust type handling

raptor-args

A flexible and simple command line arguments parser that generates friendly help messages.

Installation

npm install raptor-args --save

Usage

// Create a parser: 
var parser = require('raptor-args').createParser(options);
var parsed = parser.parse(argsArray);
 
// parsed will be an object with properties corresponding to provided arguments 

Parse arguments provided by process.argv:

Given the following JavaScript code to parse the args:

// Create a parser and parse process.argv 
require('raptor-args').createParser({
        '--foo -f': 'boolean',
        '--bar -b': 'string'
    })
    .parse();

And the following command:

node app.js --foo -b b

The output will be:

//Output: 
{
    foo: true,
    bar: 'baz'
}

You can also parse your own array of arguments instead of using process.argv:

// Create a parser and parse provided args 
require('raptor-args').createParser({
        '--foo -f': 'boolean',
        '--bar -b': 'string'
    })
    .parse(['--foo', '-b', 'baz']);
 
//Output: 
{
    foo: true,
    bar: 'baz'
}

You can also be more descriptive and add usage, examples, error handlers and validation checks:

// Create a parser: 
require('raptor-args')
    .createParser({
        '--help': {
            type: 'string',
            description: 'Show this help message'
        },
        '--foo -f': {
            type: 'string',
            description: 'Some helpful description for "foo"'
        },
        '--bar -b': {
            type: 'string',
            description: 'Some helpful description for "bar"'
        }
    })
    .usage('Usage: $0 [options]')
    .example(
        'First example',
        '$0 --foo hello')
    .example(
        'Second example',
        '$0 --foo hello --bar world')
    .validate(function(result) {
        if (result.help) {
            this.printUsage();
            process.exit(0);
        }
 
        if (!result.foo || !result.bar) {
            this.printUsage();
            console.log('--foo or --bar is required');
            process.exit(1);
        }
    })
    .onError(function(err) {
        this.printUsage();
        console.error(err);
        process.exit(1);
    })
    .parse();

Running the above program with the --help argument will produce the following output:

Usage: args [options]
 
Examples:
 
  First example:
     args --foo hello
 
  Second example:
     args --foo hello --bar world
 
Options:
 
  --help Show this help message [string]
 
--foo -f Some helpful description for "foo" [string]
 
--bar -b Some helpful description for "bar" [string]

Aliases can be provided as space-separated values for an option:

// Create a parser: 
var parser = require('raptor-args').createParser({
    '--foobar --foo -f': 'string', // "--foobar" has two aliases: "--foo" and "-f" 
    '--hello -h': 'string',        // "--hello" has one alias: "-h" 
});
 
parser.parse('--foo FOO -h HELLO'.split(' '));
// Output: 
{
    foobar: 'FOO',
    hello: 'HELLO'
}
 
// **NOTE**: Only the first entry is used to determine the target property name--not the aliases. 

An argument value of "true" or "false" is automatically converted to the corresponding boolean type. If a argument is prefixed with "no-" then it will be set to false.

// Create a parser: 
var parser = require('raptor-args').createParser({
    '--foo': 'boolean',
    '--bar': 'boolean'
});
 
parser.parse('--foo --no-bar'.split(' '));
// Output: 
{
    foo: true,
    bar: false
}

Any argument with multiple values will result in an Array value, but if you want to force an array for a single value then you can append "[]" to the option type as shown in the following sample code:

// Create a parser: 
var parser = require('raptor-args').createParser({
    '--foo': 'string[]'
});
 
parser.parse('--foo a'.split(' '));
// Output: 
{
    foo: ['a']
}
 
parser.parse('--foo a b c'.split(' '));
// Output: 
{
    foo: ['a', 'b', 'c']
}

A parser will throw an error for unrecognized arguments unless wildcards are used as shown in the examples below.

// Create a parser: 
var parser = require('raptor-args').createParser({
    '--foo -f *': 'string[]' // Any unrecognized argument at the beginning is an alias for "foo" 
});
 
parser.parse('a b --foo c'.split(' '));
// Output: 
{
    foo: ['a', 'b', 'c']
}
// Create a parser: 
var parser = require('raptor-args').createParser({
    '*': null
});
 
parser.parse('a b --foo FOO --bar BAR'.split(' '));
// Output: 
{
    '*': ['a', 'b'],
    foo: 'FOO',
    bar: 'BAR'
}

Square brackets can be used to begin and end complex types:

// Create a parser: 
var parser = require('raptor-args').createParser({
    '--foo -f': 'boolean',
    '--plugins --plugin -p': {
        options: {
            '--module -m *': 'string',
            '-*': null
        }
    }
});
 
var parsed = parser.parse('--foo --plugins [ --module plugin1 -x -y ] [ plugin2 -z Hello ]'.split(' '));
 
// Output: 
{
    foo: true,
    plugins: [
        {
            module: 'plugin1',
            x: true,
            y: true
        },
        {
            module: 'plugin2',
            z: 'Hello'
        }
    ]
}

Similar Projects

  • optimist - Popular but deprecated. Awkward API and not DRY as shown in the following comparison:

optimist:

var result = require('optimist')(args)
    .alias('h', 'help')
    .describe('h', 'Show this help message')
    .boolean('h')
    .alias('f', 'foo')
    .describe('f', 'Some helpful description for "foo"')
    .string('f')
    .alias('b', 'bar')
    .describe('b', 'Some helpful description for "bar"')
    .string('b')
    .argv;

raptor-args:

var result = require('raptor-args')
    .createParser({
        '--help':   { type: 'string', description: 'Show this help message' },
        '--foo -f': { type: 'string', description: 'Some helpful description for "foo"' },
        '--bar -b': { type: 'string', description: 'Some helpful description for "bar"' }
    })
    .parse();
  • yargs - A fork of optimist with documentation for those who speak Pirate.
  • minimist - Very few features (by design). Not DRY.

TODO

  • Support equal separator: --hello=world
  • Support number arg: -x256
  • Detect repeated declared options and throw an error
  • Add support for a default value
var parser = require('../')
    .createParser({
        '--foo -f': {
            type: 'boolean',
            defaultValue: true
        }
    });

Additional Reading

For module help, check out the test cases under the "test" directory.

License

MIT