Nocturnally Psychologizing Millipede

npm

Ready to take your JavaScript development to the next level? Meet npm Enterprise - the ultimate in enterprise JavaScript.Learn more »

prunk

1.3.1 • Public • Published

prunk

prunk is a mocking utility for node.js require(). It allows you to mock, suppress or alias imports based on their name, regular expressions or custom test functions.

Build Status Dependencies Dev Dependencies

Example

The great thing about testing React components is that you do not need a web browser but can run tests and render components directly in node. This can be a bit tricky if you use a development environment that allows you to import non-JavaScript resources (e.g. templates or stylesheets) in your code.

Given you have a React component you want to test. This component imports a SCSS files so that the import in node would fail.

// MyComp.js
import { Component } from 'react';
import './style.scss';
 
export default class Mycomp extends Component {
    // ...
}

At this point, you either can introduce a pre-compiler, a loader or whatever your test framework supports or you can simply make sure the stylesheet does not get imported.

// MyComp.spec.js
const prunk = require('prunk');
 
prunk.mock('./style.scss', 'no scss, dude.');
// or
prunk.mock( req => './style.scss' === req, 'no scss, dude');
// or
prunk.mock( /\.(css|scss|sass)$/, 'no styles, dude');
 
const MyComp = require('./MyComp');

Note:

In this example, require() is used instead of import because some pre-compilers move all imports to the top of the file and that would make the mocking impossible. If you use mocha you can leverage it's compiler configuration for that. (You might also check out this post with an example).


The example above uses .mock() to replace the required module contents. If you just want to make sure some things don't get imported at all you can suppress them. Then, they will always return undefined.

// MyComp.spec.js
const prunk = require('prunk');
 
prunk.suppress('./style.scss');
// or
prunk.suppress( req => './style.scss' === req );
// or
prunk.suppress( /\.(css|scss|sass)$/ );
 
const MyComp = require('./MyComp');

Maybe mocking an import is more than just a one-liner. You can then alias it to another file.

const prunk = require('prunk');
 
prunk.alias('./style.scss', './style.js');
// or
prunk.alias(/style\.(scss)$/, 'js') // Replaces the first group
// or
prunk.alias( what => './style.scss' === what, () => './style.js' );

API

prunk.mock(test, value)

Mocks the given import with the given value. test can be a predicate function that is used to compare whatever is required and returns either true or false. If the return value is truthy the import will be mocked with the given value.

The function gets the required path as an argument.

var mockStyles = req => 'style.css' === req;
prunk.mock( mockStyles, 'no css, dude.');

test can also be a RegExp that is matched agains the name of the import or a string. It can be anything else, too, if your imports are gone totally crazy.

prunk.mock( 'style.css', 'no css, dude.' );
prunk.mock( /\.(css|scss|sass|less)/, 'no styles, dude.');

This function returns the prunk object so that you can chain calls.

prunk.mock( ... )
     .mock( ... )
     .mock( ... );

prunk.unmock(test)

Removes the mock registered for the given test. unmock() uses strict equal to compare the registered mocks.

This function returns the prunk object so that you can chain calls.

prunk.unmockAll()

Removes all mocks.

This function returns the prunk object so that you can chain calls.

prunk.suppress(test)

Suppresses all imports that match the given test. test can be a function that is used to compare whatever is required and returns true or false. If the return value is truthy the import will be suppressed and thus returns undefined.

The function gets the required path as an argument.

var mockStyles = (req) => 'style.css' === req;
prunk.suppress( mockStyles );

test can also be a RegExp that is matched against the name of the import or a string or something else.

prunk.suppress( 'style.css' );
prunk.suppress( /\.(css|scss|sass|less)/ );

This function returns the prunk object so that you can chain calls.

prunk.unsuppress(test)

Removes the mock registered for the given test. unsuppress() uses strict equal to compare the suppressed imports.

This function returns the prunk object so that you can chain calls.

prunk.unsuppressAll()

Removes all suppressed imports.

This function returns the prunk object so that you can chain calls.

prunk.alias(test, alias)

This function provides a simple way to alias paths when required. As the other functions, it takes a test that can either be a string, a regular expression or predicate function. Some special rules apply here, though.

If you pass a string as the first argument the required path will match if it begins or equals your string. The alias parameter is meant to be a string, too and simple string manipulation will be performed. It will only replace the first occurrence of the search pattern.

prunk.alias('foo', 'bar');
require('foo'); // aliased to require('bar')
require('foo/foofoo'); // aliased to require('bar/foofoo');

It is also possible to provide a regular expression. It has to contain a grouping expression ( ) so that the replacement of the tested value works. prunk.alias will throw an error if the regex does not contain a group.

prunk.alias(/^(foo)/, 'bar');
require('foo'); // aliased to require('bar')
require('foo/foofoo'); // aliased to require('bar/foofoo');

Both, string and regexes also accept a function as the second argument. This function gets the required path and is supposed to return a path which is then required.

prunk.alias('foo', path => `my-foo-dir/${path}` );
require('foo'); // aliased to require('my-foo-dir/foo')
require('foo/foofoo'); // aliased to require('my-foo-dir/foo/foofoo');

The third possibility is to provide a predicate function as test. Since prunk cannot know how to alias a path matched with a predicate you have to provide a function as second argument, too. prunk.alias will throw if you don't.

prunk.alias( path => path.startsWith('bar'), 'test' );  // will throw!
 
prunk.alias( path => path.startsWith('foo'), () => 'bar' );
require('foo'); // aliased to require('bar')

prunk.unalias(test)

Removes the alias for the given test.

This function returns the prunk object so that you can chain calls.

prunk.unaliasAll()

Removes all aliases.

This function returns the prunk object so that you can chain calls.

prunk.teardown()

Removes all aliases and suppressed/mocked imports. Shorthand for

prunk.unmockAll();
prunk.unsuppressAll();
prunk.unaliasAll();

More documentation

Documented source.

install

npm i prunk

Downloadsweekly downloads

455

version

1.3.1

license

Apache-2.0

homepage

github.com

repository

Gitgithub

last publish

collaborators

  • avatar
Report a vulnerability