node-test

1.4.6 • Public • Published

node-test

node-test is a simple, asynchronous test runner. It's designed to address what are limitations of existing Node.js test runners. Writing tests should be just like writing any other code.

Table of Contents

Design

  • Runs Tests Concurrently (In Parallel)
  • No global variables (no describe(), it(), etc).
  • No CLI required - Running a test file directly (node test/test-something.js) produces the same output as using the CLI.
  • Long/Async Stack Traces
  • Debuggable - Does not fork tests by default.
  • No planning tests or counting assertions required.
  • Easily Build Asynchronous Tests - via Promises or Callbacks
  • Extended assertion library built from the core assert module
  • Failure Validate - easily test error conditions

Installation

$ npm install --save-dev node-test

Example

'use strict';
const Suite = require('node-test');

function funcReturnsPromise() {
    return Promise.resolve(2);
}

function funcWithCallback(cb) {
    cb();
}

const suite = new Suite('My Suite Name');
suite.test('Test 1', t => {
    return funcReturnsPromise()
        .then(result => {
            t.equal(result, 2);
        });
});

suite.skip('Test 2', t => {
    throw new Error('skipped');
});

suite.todo('Test 3 - Coming Soon');

suite.test('Test 4', (t, done) => {
    funcWithCallback(done);
});

suite.test('Test 5 - Error', t => {
    t.equal(1, 2);
},
(err, t) => {
    t.equal(err.message, '1 === 2');
});

Output:

---My Suite Name---
pass 1 - Test 1 (5ms)
skip 2 - Test 2
todo 3 - Test 3 - Coming Soon
pass 4 - Test 4 (5ms)
pass 5 - Test 5 - Error (4ms)

Total: 3
Passed: 3 100%

Process finished with exit code 0

API

Suite

A suite is a grouping of tests.

Create a Suite

new Suite(name, [options])- suite constructor
Arguments
  • name: string - title for test
const Suite = require('node-test');

const suite = new Suite('My Suite Name');

Concurrent Tests

By default node-test runs tests concurrently. For concurrent test to work properly, they should also be atomic. They should not depend on other tests for state.

The following methods are used to create concurrent tests.

suite.test(name, action, [validateError]) - Create a new test.
Arguments
  • name: string - title for test
  • action: function(t, [state], [done]) - test implementation
    • t: object - (built-in assertions)
    • state: object (optional) - result of beforeEach hook
    • done: function (optional) - callback for asynchronous tests
  • validateError: function (optional) - function to validate the error
Test Resolution
  • Any Error throw synchronously will cause the test to fail.
  • Asynchronous test can return a Promise or use the done() callback.
    • If the test returns a Promise, the test will pass or fail if the promise resolves or rejects, respectively.
    • If the done() callback is used, the test will fail if the first argument is defined. See Node.js style callbacks.
  • validateError can turn a failing test into a passing test, if the error validates. (see below)
Synchronous Test:
suite.test('My Test', t => {
    const result = funcReturnsNumber();
    t.equal(result, 2);
});
Test with Promise:
suite.test('My Test', t => {
    return funcReturnsPromise()
        .then(result => {
            t.equal(result, 2);
        });
});
Tests with a Synchronous Callback
suite.test('My Test', (t, done) => {
    funcWithCallback((err, result) => {
        t.noError(err);
        t.equal(result, 2);
        done();
    });
});

suite.test('My Test 2', (t, done) => {
    funcWithCallbackNoValue(done);
});
Tests with a Asynchronous Callback

For more info on t.async() see Assertion documentation.

suite.test('My Test', (t, done) => {
    funcWithCallback(t.async((err, result) => {
        t.noError(err);
        t.equal(result, 2);
        done();
    }));
});

suite.test('My Test 2', (t, done) => {
    funcWithCallbackNoValue(done);
});
Error Validation

validateError tests that a specific error was throw. This is makes it easy to test error conditions. The test will pass, if validateError is passed to the test and does not throw.

Passing Test

In this example the main test fails, but validateError passes. So the whole test is considered to have pass.

t.throws(() => {
  return Promise.reject(new Error('expected error'));
},
err => {
  t.true(err instanceof Error);
  t.equal(err.message, 'expected error');
});
Failing Test

In this example the main test fails and validateError fails too. The error is not what validateError expected, so the test fails.

t.throws(() => {
  return Promise.reject(new Error('expected error'));
},
err => {
  t.equal(err.message, 'other error');
});
suite.skip(name, action) - Creates a new test that will be skipped when the suite is run.
Arguments

Same as suite.test().

suite.only(name, action) - Creates a new test that will be run exclusively.

When the suite run, only tests will be run and all other tests will be skipped.

Arguments

Same as suite.test().

suite.todo(name) - Creates a test placeholder.

The "test" will be shown in the output, but will not count toward the total.

Arguments
  • name: string - title for test
suite.failing(name, action) - Creates a new test that is expected to fail.

The test included as a failed test in the output, but don't cause the exit code to change (indicating the build failed).

Arguments

Same as suite.test().

Serial Tests

node-test also supports serial tests (one at a time). Most of the time concurrent test are preferable, however there are times (such as when accessing a database) that you may want tests to run serially.

Within a suite, serial tests are executed first followed by any concurrent tests. However, multiple suites are run concurrently. So two serial tests could run at the same time if they are members of different suites.

The following methods are used to create serial tests. There usage is identical to the equivalent concurrent method.

suite.serial.test(name, action)
Arguments

Same as suite.test().

suite.serial.skip(name, action)
Arguments

Same as suite.test().

suite.serial.only(name, action)
Arguments

Same as suite.test().

suite.serial.todo(name)
Arguments

Same as suite.test().

suite.serial.failing(name, action)
Arguments

Same as suite.test().

Hooks

node-test provides four hooks. The hooks are run serially to the tests.

suite.before(action) - Run before all tests in the suite.

Arguments
  • name: string - title for test
  • action: function(t, done) - test implementation
    • t: object - (built-in assertions)
    • done: function (optional) - callback for asynchronous tests

suite.after(action) - Run after all tests in the suite.

Arguments
  • name: string - title for test
  • action: function(t, done) - test implementation
    • t: object - (built-in assertions)
    • done: function (optional) - callback for asynchronous tests

suite.beforeEach(action) - Run before each individual tests in the suite.

Arguments
  • name: string - title for test
  • action: function(t, [state], [done]) - test implementation
    • t: object - (built-in assertions)
    • done: function (optional) - callback for asynchronous tests

The beforeEach hook runs before each test in the suite.

Usage with suite.beforeEach()

The beforeEach hook is execute for every individual test, so each test has it's own state. Notice how state.data is 2 for both tests, even though the tests modify it.

If beforeHook is called, state is inserted as the second argument of the test action between t and done.

suite.beforeEach(t => {
    return {
        data: 2
    };
});

suite.test('My Test 1', (t, state) => {
    t.equal(2, state.data);
    state.date = 3;
});

suite.test('My Test 2', (t, state, done) => {
    t.equal(2, state.data);
    done();
});

suite.afterEach((t, state) => {
    state.data = 0;
});

suite.afterEach(action) - Run after each individual tests in the suite.

Arguments
  • name: string - title for test
  • action: function(t, [state], [done]) - test implementation
    • t: object - (built-in assertions)
    • state: object (optional) - result of beforeEach hook
    • done: function (optional) - callback for asynchronous tests

Other Members

suite.config(options) - Set the time limit for tests (default: 5000)
  • options: object
    • failFast: boolean (default: false) - If a single test fails, stop all remaining tests in the suite.
    • timeout: number (default: 5000) - A time out for tests. If test's execution time exceeds the value, the test will fail.
suite.config({
    failFast: false,
    timeout: 10000
});

t (Built-In Assertion Library)

node-test includes an assertion library that extends the core assert module.

For every method, message is optional. If defined, it will be displayed if the assertion fails.

t.pass() - A positive assertion.

t.pass();

t.fail([message])

t.fail();

t.true(value, [message])

An assertion that value is strictly true.

const value = true;
t.true(value);

const arr = ['a'];
t.true(arr.length === 1);

t.false(value, [message])

An assertion that value is strictly false.

const value = false;
t.false(value);

t.truthy(value, [message]) alias: t.assert()

An assertion that value is strictly truthy.

const value = 1;
t.truthy(value);

t.falsey(value, [message])

An assertion that value is strictly falsey.

const value = 0;
t.falsey(value);

t.equal(value, expected, [message]) aliases: t.is(), t.equals()

An assertion that value is strictly equal to expected.

const value = 1;
t.equal(value, 1);

t.notEqual(value, expected, [message]) aliases: t.not(), t.notEquals()

An assertion that value is strictly not equal to expected.

const value = 1;
t.notEqual(value, 2);

t.deepEqual(value, expected, [message])

An assertion that value is strictly and deeply equal to expected. Deep equality is tested by the not-so-shallow module.

const value = { data: 1234 };
t.deepEqual(value, { data: 1234 });

t.notDeepEqual(value, expected, [message])

An assertion that value is strictly and deeply not equal to expected.

const value = { data: 1234 };
t.notDeepEqual(value, { data: 5678 });

t.greaterThan(value, expected, [message])

An assertion that value is greater than expected.

const value = 2;
t.greaterThan(value, 1);

t.greaterThanOrEqual(value, expected, [message])

An assertion that value is greater than or equal to expected.

const value = 2;
t.greaterThanOrEqual(value, 2);

t.lessThan(value, expected, [message])

An assertion that value is less than expected.

const value = 1;
t.lessThan(value, 2);

t.lessThanOrEqual(value, expected, [message])

An assertion that value is less than or equal to expected. *message is optional. If defined, it will be displayed if the assertion fails.

const value = 1;
t.lessThanOrEqual(value, 1);

t.noError(error, [message])

An assertion that error is falsey. This is functionally similar to t.falsey(), but the assertion error message indicates the failure was due to an Error.

funcWithCallback((err, result) => {
    t.noError(err);
});

t.notThrows(fn, [message])

An assertion that fn is function that does not throws an Error synchronously nor asynchronously (via Promise or callback).

Arguments
  • fn: function([done]) - code to assert throws
    • (optional) done: function - callback for asynchronous test
Synchronous Assertion

Passing:

t.notThrows(() => {
    t.equal(1, 1);
});

Failing:

t.throws(() => {
    throw new Error('error');
});
Asynchronous Assertion with Promises
t.notThrows(() => {
    return funcReturnsPromise();
});
Asynchronous/Synchronous Assertion with Callback

The callback can be asynchronous or synchronous. The callback can be executed immediately or later. It will be handled the same.

t.notThrows(done1 => {
    funcWithAsyncCallback(done1);
});
t.notThrows(done1 => {
    funcWithSyncCallback(done1);
});
Mixed Synchronous & Asynchronous

Even if an asynchronous mode is used, synchronous errors are caught. Failing:

t.notThrows(done => {
    funcWithAsyncCallback(done);
    throw new Error('message');
});
t.notThrows(done => {
    throw new Error('message');
    return funcReturnsPromise();
});

t.throws(fn, [validateError], [message])

An assertion that fn is function that either throws an Error synchronously or asynchronously (via Promise or callback).

Arguments
  • fn: function([done]) - code to assert throws
    • (optional) done: function - callback for asynchronous test
  • validateError: function - function to validate the error

Except for the validateError argument, this functions as the opposite of t.notThrow(). That is throws passes when there is an Error rather passing when there is no Error. For more usage details, look at the notThrows examples.

Passing validateError allows testing that the Error received is the Error expected.

t.throws(() => {
    return funcReturnsPromise();
},
err => {
    t.true(err instanceof TypeError);
    t.equal(err.message, 'invalid argument');
});

t.async([fn], [count])

An assertion that wraps any asynchronous functions so the test awaits the function being called and ensures asynchronous errors are caught. t.async makes it easy to wait on asynchronous callbacks.

Arguments
  • fn: function (optional) - counting function
  • count: number (optional) - number of times to expect to be called

If fn is passed, then async does not interpret errors from Node-style callback. It simply passed them through.

funcWithAsyncCallback(t.async((err, result) => {
    t.noError(err);
    t.equals(1, result);
}));

setTimeout(t.async(() => {
    t.pass();
}), 200);

If fn is not passed, then async acts as a Node-style callback. If the first argument is treated as an error.

function funcWithAsyncCallback(cb) {
    cb(new Error('error'));
}

funcWithAsyncCallback(t.async());

If count is passed, the function is expected to be called more than once.

const count = t.count((err, result) => {
    t.noError(err);
}, 2);
funcWithAsyncCallback(count);
funcWithAsyncCallback(count);

Running Multiple Suites

There are couple ways to run multiple suites.

  1. The easiest (and least flexible) way to just place multiple suites in a single file.

  2. A more flexible way is to create one suite per file and create an index file to run them all.

    A project test directory might look like this:

    suite1.js
    suite2.js
    suite3.js
    

    Then, create a file named index.js like this:

    'use strict';
    require('./suite1');
    require('./suite2');
    require('./suite3');

    Then add the script to your package.json file:

    "scripts": {
      "test": "node test/index.js"
    }

    Now you can run individual suites from the command line.

    > node tests/suite1.js
    > node tests/suite3.js

    Or you can run the whole thing.

    > npm test
  3. The up coming CLI will make it easier to execute multiple suites without needing to maintain an index.js.

Custom Reporters

A reporter is a simple constructor function that takes an event emitter as it's only argument. The emitter emit four different events.

const Suite = require('node-test');

function Reporter(emitter) {
    emitter.on('start', root => {
        console.log('testing started');
    });
    
    emitter.on('testEnd', test => {
        
    });
    
    emitter.on('suiteEnd', suite => {
        
    });
    
    emitter.on('end', () => {
    });
}

Suite.addReporter(Reporter);

Suite.addReporter(Reporter)

Add a reporter to the runner for all suites. If no reporter is added, the default reporter will be used.

Event: start

Emitted before tests start running.

root => { }

  • root: object
    • suites: array - suites that will be run (see suiteEnd for suite structure)

Event: testEnd

Emitted after a test has completed.

test => { }

  • test: object
    • name: string - name of test
    • suite: object - suite the test belongs to
    • status: string - pass, fail, todo, skip, or stop
    • runTime: number - run time of test in milliseconds

Event: suiteEnd

Emitted after a suite has completed.

suite => { }

  • suite: object
    • name: string - name of test
    • err: Error|undefined - suite level errors, such as beforeAll and afterAll hook errors
    • tests: array - all tests in the suite (see testEnd for test structure)

Event: end

Emitted when all suites are completed.

Multiple Library Instances

It's possibly to get separate instances of the library. The primarily useful because each suite has it's own reporters.

Suite.getNewLibraryCopy()

const Suite = require('node-test');
const NewSuite = Suite.getNewLibraryCopy();

Todo

  • CLI
    • file watcher
    • only run certain files (glob matching)
    • harmony flag
  • Support Generator Functions

Considering

  • code coverage
  • slow tests
  • logging - ala Karma
  • support CoffeeScript, TypeScript
  • support plugins

Readme

Keywords

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