mqtt2homekit

1.0.0 • Public • Published

mqtt2homekit

Control HomeKit-enabled devices with the ubiquity of MQTT

NPM Version GitHub license

mqtt2homekit is a Node.js application that links HomeKit-enabled devices to an MQTT broker. It is designed to be used to integrate these devices into a home automation system in the style of mqtt-smarthome.

But wait!

"homekit2mqtt already exists! How is this different?" I hear you ask.

The answer is that this project is more or less the opposite of homekit2matt -- with homekitk2mqtt you use HomeKit tech (Siri, apps, etc) to control non-HomeKit-enabled devices using MQTT. With mqtt2homekit you use MQTT to control devices that are HomeKit-enabled but that don't provide any other API that meets your needs. For example, the Ecobee3 thermostat only provides an API that goes through their cloud server, whereas with this tool you can control your thermostat over your local network with no cloud service involved.

Getting Started

mqtt2homekit is distributed through NPM:

npm install -g mqtt2homekit
 
# or, if you prefer: 
yarn global add mqtt2homekit

Running it is likewise easy:

mqtt2homekit -m mapping.json                      # if your MQTT broker is running on localhost 
mqtt2homekit -m mapping.json -b mqtt://<hostname> # if your broker is running elsewhere 
mqtt2homekit --help                               # to see the full usage documentation 

mqtt2homekit supports as many mapping files as you choose to provide, so you only need one running instance for all of your HomeKit devices:

mqtt2homekit -m map1.json -m map2.json # ... etc 

Pairing

Currently pairing with the HomeKit device is left up to hap-client-tool. Please specify the client name mqtt2homekit when pairing:

$ yarn add global hap-client-tool
$ hap-client-tool -c mqtt2homekit -d <ip> -p <port> pair

Topics and Payloads

Because mqtt2homekit can connect to such a wide variety of different equipment, it requires some help from you in the form of a mapping file to figure out how to map devices to topics and payloads.

From this, a set of topics to publish and subscribe will be caluclated:

Topic Template Description
<prefix>/status/<topicName> Readable properties will automatically publish their values here
<prefix>/get/<topicName> Readable properties will subscribe to these topics to listen for requests to refresh.
<prefix>/set/<topicName> Writeable properties will subscribe to these topics to listen for changes

In addition, any properties that support update notification events will automatically listen for those events and publish the new values.

Creating your own mapping

At the top level, the mapping file contains device info and a list of topics:

{
  "host": "aaa.bbb.ccc.ddd",
  "port": 12345,
  "topics": [
      // ...
  ]
}

Each topic consists of an MQTT topic prefix, a HomeKit accessory ID, and a list of values:

{
  "prefix": "sensors:bedroom",
  "aid": 3,
  "values": [
      // ...
  ]
}

Each value consists of an MQTT topic name, a HomeKit instance ID, and an optional valueMap that maps from HomeKit values to MQTT payloads.

{
  "iid": 3089,
  "topicName": "isBatteryLow",
  "valueMap": {
    "0": "false",
    "1": "true
  }
}

Here's a complete example:

{
    "host": "aaa.bbb.ccc.ddd",
    "port": 12345,
    "topics": [
        {
            "prefix": "ecobee:home",
            "aid": 1,
            "values": [
                {
                    "iid": 17,
                    "topicName": "currentState"
                },
                {
                    "iid": 18,
                    "topicName": "targetState"
                },
                {
                    "iid": 19,
                    "topicName": "currentTemp"
                },
                {
                    "iid": 20,
                    "topicName": "targetTemp"
                }
            ]
        },
        {
            "prefix": "sensors:hallway",
            "aid": 1,
            "values": [
                {
                    "iid": 66,
                    "topicName": "isMotionDetected"
                },
                {
                    "iid": 65,
                    "topicName": "isOccupied",
                    "valueMap": {
                        "0": "false",
                        "1": "true"
                    }
                }
            ]
        },
        {
            "prefix": "sensors:livingroom",
            "aid": 2,
            "values": [
                {
                    "iid": 2064,
                    "topicName": "currentTemp"
                },
                {
                    "iid": 2065,
                    "topicName": "isBatteryLow",
                    "valueMap": {
                        "0": "false",
                        "1": "true"
                    }
                },
                {
                    "iid": 2060,
                    "topicName": "isMotionDetected"
                }
            ]
        },
        {
            "prefix": "sensors:bedroom",
            "aid": 3,
            "values": [
                {
                    "iid": 3088,
                    "topicName": "currentTemp"
                },
                {
                    "iid": 3089,
                    "topicName": "isBatteryLow",
                    "valueMap": {
                        "0": "false",
                        "1": "true"
                    }
                },
                {
                    "iid": 3084,
                    "topicName": "isMotionDetected"
                }
            ]
        }
    ]
}

In addition to pairing, hap-client-tool is very useful for developing a new mapping file. Its dump command will dump a list of all of the supported accessories, services, and characteristics provided by your device.

# after pairing 
$ hap-client-tool -c mqtt2homekit -d <ip> -p <port> dump

Contributing

Contributions are of course always welcome. If you find problems, please report them in the Issue Tracker. If you've made an improvement or you'd like to contribute an example mapping file or metadata about a new device type's custom properties, open a pull request.

Getting set up for development is very easy:

git clone <your fork>
cd mqtt2homekit
yarn

And the development workflow is likewise straightforward:

# make a change to the src/ file, then... 
yarn build
node dist/index.js
 
# or if you want to clean up all the leftover build products: 
yarn run clean

Release History

  • 1.0.0
    • The first release.

Meta

Zach Bean – zb@forty2.com

Distributed under the MIT license. See LICENSE for more detail.

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