National Patience Month

    hyperstyles

    3.3.1 • Public • Published

    hyperstyles

    Transparently apply CSS Modules to hyperscript-compatible DOM builders, such as virtual-hyperscript and React.

    $ npm install hyperstyles
    

    Here's a quick example using virtual-hyperscript in ES2015:

    import vh from 'virtual-dom/h';
    import hyperstyles from 'hyperstyles';
    import styles from './car.css';
     
    const h = hyperstyles(vh, styles);
     
    export default function render() {
        return h('div.root', [
            h('div.front-door'),
            h('div.back-door')
        ]);
    }

    When rendered, the following markup will be produced:

    <div class="Car__root___hHwf0">
        <div class="Car__front-door___i3N9f"></div>
        <div class="Car__back-door___27Guk"></div>
    </div>

    Usage

    To use CSS Modules, you'll need to set up your module bundler to load Interoperable CSS.

    Once your build process is configured you can use hyperstyles!

    ES2015 (JSX), using React.createElement:

    /** @jsx h */
     
    import React from 'react';
    import styles from './car.css';
    import hyperstyles from 'hyperstyles';
     
    const h = hyperstyles(React.createElement, styles);
     
    export default class Car extends React.Component {
        render () {
            return (
                <div styleName="root">
                    <div styleName="front-door"></div>
                    <div styleName="back-door"></div>
                </div>
            );
        }
    });

    Note that we use the styleName property instead of className to denote classes we want to replace using the CSS module. You can use them together and classNames will remain as they are, with styleNames appended.

    ES5, using virtual-hyperscript:

    var hyperstyles = require('hyperstyles');
    var styles = require('./car.css');
     
    var h = hyperstyles(require('virtual-dom/h'), styles);
     
    module.exports = function render() {
        return h('div.root', [
            h('div.front-door'),
            h('div.back-door')    // or: h('div', {styleName: 'back-door'})
        ]);
    }

    ES5, using React.createElement:

    var React = require('react');
    var styles = require('./car.css');
    var hyperstyles = require('hyperstyles');
     
    var h = hyperstyles(React.createElement, styles);
     
    var Car = React.createClass({
        render: function () {
            return h('div.root', [
                h('div.front-door'),
                h('div.back-door')
            ]);
        }
    });
     
    module.exports = Car;

    ES5+2015, using hyperx + virtual-hyperscript:

    var h = require('virtual-dom/h')
    var hyperx = require('hyperx');
    var hyperstyles = require('hyperstyles');
    var styles = require('./car.css');
     
    var hx = hyperx(hyperstyles(h, styles));
     
    module.exports = function render() {
      return hx`<div styleName="root">
            <div styleName="front-door"></div>
            <div styleName="back-door"></div>
        </div>`;
    };

    Tips

    Here's a couple of ways to get the most out of hyperstyles

    Tip A: Use partial application

    If you just supply a single argument (a hyperscript-compatible function) to hyperstyles, it'll return a function which you can then call multiple times with different CSS modules to create multiple wrapped functions.

    In hyper.js:

    import hyperstyles from 'hyperstyles';
    import h from 'virtual-dom/h';
     
    export default hyperstyles(h);

    In car.js:

    import hyper from './hyper';
    import styles from './car.css';
     
    const h = hyper(styles);
     
    export default function render() {
        return h('div.root', [
            h('div.front-door'),
            h('div.back-door')
        ]);
    }

    In bike.js:

    import hyper from './hyper';
    import styles from './car.css';
     
    const h = hyper(styles);
     
    export default function render() {
        return h('div.root', [
            h('div.front-wheel'),
            h('div.back-wheel')
        ]);
    }

    Tip B: Use the tagName shorthand

    You can use the tagName className shorthand (as demonstrated in the first example) as an alternative to setting the styleName property. The shorthand will even work with React, as long as you're not using JSX.

    Any CSS classes you write in the shorthand format will be transformed into the className property by hyperstyles, even if you didn't pass any properties in. If your underlying DOM creation function also recognises this kind of shorthand, you can safely include your desired element id, which will be passed through once hyperstyles has transformed the classNames.

    Here's what would happen during the transform:

    In Out
    ['div'] ['div']
    ['div.things'] ['div', {className: 'things__r489jf'}]
    ['div.things', {className: 'stuff'}] ['div', {className: 'stuff things__r489jf'}]
    ['div.things#stuff'] ['div#stuff', {className: 'things__r489jf'}]

    Tests

    $ npm test
    

    There are currently tests to ensure hyperstyles is compatible with the following utilities:

    It has also been succesfully used with crel, which cannot be tested outside a browser environment.

    License

    ISC

    Install

    npm i hyperstyles

    DownloadsWeekly Downloads

    26

    Version

    3.3.1

    License

    ISC

    Last publish

    Collaborators

    • colingourlay