node package manager

grunt-ts

Compile and manage your TypeScript project

grunt-ts

Grunt-ts is an npm package that handles TypeScript compilation work in GruntJS build scripts. It provides a Grunt-compatible wrapper for the tsc command-line compiler, and provides some additional functionality that improves the TypeScript development workflow. Grunt-ts supports compiling against tsconfig.json or even a Visual Studio project directly. Grunt-ts is itself written in TypeScript.

Latest release is 5.4.0. Full changelog is here.

If you've never used GruntJS on your computer, you should follow the detailed instructions here to get Node.js and the grunt-cli working. If you're a Grunt expert, simply follow these steps:

  • Run npm install grunt-ts in your project directory; this will install grunt-ts, TypeScript, and GruntJS.
  • Add the ts task in your Gruntfile.js (see below for a minimalist one).
  • Run grunt at the command line in your project folder to compile your TypeScript code.

This minimalist Gruntfile.js will compile *.ts files in all subdirectories of the project folder, excluding anything under node_modules:

module.exports = function(grunt) {
  grunt.initConfig({
    ts: {
      default : {
        src: ["**/*.ts", "!node_modules/**/*.ts"]
      }
    }
  });
  grunt.loadNpmTasks("grunt-ts");
  grunt.registerTask("default", ["ts"]);
};

A more extensive sample Gruntfile.js is available here.

  • Allows use of all standard GruntJS functionality such as use of customizable task targets, globbing, use of the files object (for instantiating multiple independent tsc runs in a single target), etc.
  • Allows the developer to select a custom TypeScript compiler version for their project, or even use a custom (in-house) version.
  • Supports most switches of the tsc TypeScript Compiler via options in the gruntfile ts task, and also supports switch overrides per-target.
  • Supports Visual Studio Projects as a compile target for identifying TypeScript files, setting up compile configuration, or both.
  • Supports TypeScript Projects via tsconfig.json when used with TypeScript 1.5 or higher.
  • Provides a transforms feature that eases code refactoring by taking the burden of relative path maintenance off the developer. If the paths to a set of files changes, grunt-ts will regenerate the relevant sections. This feature supports:
  • Allows concatenation where supported by the TypeScript compiler's --out switch
  • Encodes HTML files as TypeScript variables (for HTML templating engines)
  • Performs live file watching (compile on save)
  • Enables "Fast" compile when using external modules

Grunt-ts provides explicit support for most tsc switches. Any arbitrary switches can be passed to tsc via the additionalFlags feature.

tsc switch name in grunt-ts description
--allowSyntheticDefaultImports allowSyntheticDefaultImports Allows use "default" ES6 module import syntax with pre-ES6 libraries that don't have a default (on by default with SystemJS)
--declaration declaration Generates a .d.ts definitions file for compiled TypeScript files
--emitDecoratorMetadata emitDecoratorMetadata Emit metadata for type/parameter decorators.
--experimentalAsyncFunctions experimentalAsyncFunctions Enables experimental support for ES7 async functions
--experimentalDecorators experimentalDecorators Enables experimental support for ES7 decorators
--inlineSourceMap inlineSourceMap Emit a single file that includes source maps instead of emitting a separate .js.map file.
--inlineSources inlineSources Emit the TypeScript source alongside the sourcemaps within a single file; requires --inlineSourceMap to be set.
--isolatedModules isolatedModules Ensures that the output is safe to only emit single files by making cases that break single-file transpilation an error
--jsx jsx Specifies the JSX code generation style: 'preserve' or 'react'
--locale locale Specify locale for error messages.
--mapRoot LOCATION mapRoot Specifies the location where debugger should locate map files instead of generated locations.
--module KIND module Specify module style for code generation
--moduleResolution KIND moduleResolution Specifies module resolution strategy: 'node' (Node.js) or 'classic' (TypeScript pre-1.6).
--newLine newLine Explicitly specify newline character (CRLF or LF); if omitted, uses OS default.
--noEmit noEmit Check, but do not emit JS, even in the absence of errors.
--noEmitHelpers noEmitHelpers Do not generate custom helper functions like __extends in compiled output.
--noEmitOnError noEmitOnError Do not emit JavaScript if there is a compilation error
--noImplicitAny noImplicitAny Warn on expressions and declarations with an implied any type.
--noLib noLib Do not automatically include lib.d.ts is compilation context.
--noResolve noResolve Do not add triple-slash references or module import targets to the compilation context.
--out FILE out Concatenate and emit output to a single file.
--outDir DIRECTORY outDir Redirect output structure to the directory.
--preserveConstEnums preserveConstEnums Const enums will be kept as enums in the emitted JS.
--removeComments removeComments Configures if comments should be included in the output
--rootDir rootDir Allows override of common root folder calculated by --outDir.
--sourceMap sourceMap Generates corresponding .map file
--sourceRoot LOCATION sourceRoot Specifies the location where debugger should locate TypeScript files instead of source locations.
--stripInternal stripInternal does not emit members marked as @internal.
--suppressExcessPropertyErrors suppressExcessPropertyErrors Disables strict object literal assignment checking (experimental).
--suppressImplicitAnyIndexErrors suppressImplicitAnyIndexErrors Specifies the location where debugger should locate TypeScript files instead of source locations.
--target VERSION target Specify ECMAScript target version: 'es3', 'es5', or 'es6'

For file ordering, look at JavaScript Generation.

grunt-ts property where to define description
additionalFlags option string - allows passing arbitrary strings to the compiler. This is intended to enable compatibility with features not supported directly by grunt-ts.
allowSyntheticDefaultImports option true, false (default) - Allows use "default" ES6 module import syntax with pre-ES6 libraries that don't have a default (on by default with SystemJS and not required to specify).
baseDir option string - Sets root directory for maintaining source structure when using outDir and fast together. Use rootDir for newer versions of TypeScript.
comments option true, false (default) - include comments in emitted JS.
compile option true (default), false - compile TypeScript code.
compiler option string - path to custom compiler
declaration option true, false (default) - indicates that definition files should be emitted.
emitDecoratorMetadata option true, false (default) - set to true to emit metadata for ES7 decorators (will enable experimentalDecorators)
emitGruntEvents option true, false (default) - set to true to raise an event in Grunt upon failed builds.
experimentalAsyncFunctions option true, false (default) - set to true to enable support for ES7 async functions (in ES6 mode only)
experimentalDecorators option true, false (default) - set to true to enable support for ES7 decorators
failOnTypeErrors option true (default), false - fail Grunt pipeline if there is a type error. (See also noEmitOnError)
fast option 'watch' (default), 'always', 'never' - how to decide on a "fast" grunt-ts compile.
files target Sets of files to compile and optional output destination
html target string or string[] - glob to HTML templates
htmlModuleTemplate option string - HTML template namespace
htmlOutDir option string - Sets a root for output of transformed-to-TypeScript HTML files
htmlOutDirFlatten option true, false (default) - Will flatten the transformed HTML files to a single folder
htmlVarTemplate option string - HTML property name
inlineSourceMap option true, false (default) Emit a single file that includes source maps instead of emitting a separate .js.map file; If enabled, will automatically enable sourceMap.
inlineSources option true, false (default) Emit the TypeScript source alongside the sourcemaps within a single file; If enabled, will automatically enable inlineSourceMap and sourceMap.
isolatedModules option true, false (default) Ensures that the output is safe to only emit single files by making cases that break single-file transpilation an error.
jsx option 'preserve', 'react', (TypeScript default is 'react'). If 'preserve', TypeScript will emit .jsx; if 'react', TypeScript will transpile and emit .js files.
locale option string - specify locale for error messages
mapRoot option string - root for referencing .js.map files in JS
module option default to be nothing, If you want to set it you set it to either 'amd' or 'commonjs'
moduleResolution option 'classic' or 'node'. This was introduced in TypeScript 1.6. The default is 'node' if not passed. More details here.
newLine option CRLF, LF, `` (default) - If passed with a value, TypeScript will use the specified line endings. Also affects grunt-ts transforms.
noEmit option true, false (default) - If passed as true, TypeScript will not emit even if it compiles cleanly
noEmitHelpers option true, false (default) - If passed as true, TypeScript will not generate custom helper functions like __extends in compiled output
noEmitOnError option true, false (default) - If passed as true, TypeScript will not emit JS if there is an error (see also failOnTypeErrors)
noImplicitAny option true, false (default) - enable for stricter type checking
noLib option true, false (default) - do not automatically include lib.d.ts in compilation context
noResolve option true, false (default) - for deprecated version of TypeScript
options target
out target string - instruct tsc to concatenate output to this file.
outDir target string - instruct tsc to emit JS to this directory.
preserveConstEnums option true, false (default) - If true, const enums will be kept as enums in the emitted JS.
reference target string - tells grunt-ts which file to use for maintaining references
removeComments option true (default), false - removes comments in emitted JS
rootDir option string - Allows override of common root folder calculated by --outDir.
sourceRoot option string - root for referencing TS files in .js.map
sourceMap option true (default), false - indicates if source maps should be generated (.js.map)
stripInternal option true, false (default) - does not emit members marked as @internal.
suppressExcessPropertyErrors option false (default), true - indicates if TypeScript should disable strict object literal assignment checking (experimental)
suppressImplicitAnyIndexErrors option false (default), true - indicates if TypeScript should allow access to properties of an object by string indexer when --noImplicitAny is active, even if TypeScript doesn't know about them.
src target string or string[] - glob of TypeScript files to compile.
target option 'es5' (default), 'es3', or 'es6' - targeted ECMAScript version
tsconfig target true, a string path, or an object. See tsconfig for details.
verbose option true, false (default) - logs tsc command-line options to console
vs target string referencing a .csproj or .vbproj file or, {} (object) (see Visual Studio Projects for details)
watch target string - will watch for changes in the specified directory or below
something else Don't see the switch you're looking for? Check out additionalFlags

Note: In the above chart, if "where to define" is "target", the property must be defined on a target or on the ts object directly. If "where to define" is "options", then the property must be defined on an options object on ts or on a target under ts.

Grunt-ts does not support the GruntJS standard dest target property. Instead, you should use files, out, or outDir.

Grunt-ts supports use of the GruntJS-centric files property on a target as an alternative to the tsc-centric use of src and out/outDir.

Notes:

  • The fast grunt-ts option is not supported in this configuration. You should specify fast: 'never' to avoid warnings when files is used.
  • It is not supported to specify an array of values for dest with grunt-ts. A warning will be issued to the console. If a non-empty array is passed, the first element will be used and the rest will be truncated.
  • If the dest parameter ends with ".js", the value will be passed to the --out parameter of the TypeScript compiler. Otherwise, if there is a non-blank value, it will be passed to the --outDir parameter.
  • If you intend to pass the specific value "src" to the TypeScript --outDir parameter, specify it as "src/" in the dest parameter to avoid grunt-ts warnings.

Here are some examples of using the target files property with grunt-ts:

grunt.initConfig({
  ts: {
    compileTwoSetsOfFilesUsingArrayStyle: {
      // This will run tsc twice.  The first time, the result of the 'files1/**/*.ts' glob will be 
      // passed to tsc with the --out switch as 'out/ArrayStyle/1.js'. 
      // see https://github.com/gruntjs/grunt-docs/blob/master/Configuring-tasks.md#files-array-format 
      files: [{ src: ['files1/**/*.ts'], dest: 'out/ArrayStyle/1.js' },
              { src: ['files2/**/*.ts'], dest: 'out/ArrayStyle/2.js' }],
      options: {
        fast: 'never'
      }
    },
    compileTwoSetsOfFilesToDirUsingArrayStyle: {
      // This will run tsc twice.  The first time, the result of the 'files1/**/*.ts' glob will be 
      // passed to tsc with the --outDir switch as 'out/ArrayStyle'. 
      // see https://github.com/gruntjs/grunt-docs/blob/master/Configuring-tasks.md#files-array-format 
      files: [{ src: ['files1/**/*.ts'], dest: 'out/ArrayStyle' },
              { src: ['files2/**/*.ts'], dest: 'out/ArrayStyle' }],
      options: {
        fast: 'never'
      }
    },
    compileTwoSetsOfFilesUsingObjectStyle: {
      // This will run tsc twice.  The first time, the result of the 'files1/**/*.ts' glob will be 
      // passed to tsc with the --out switch as 'out/ObjectStyle/1.js'. 
      // see https://github.com/gruntjs/grunt-docs/blob/master/Configuring-tasks.md#files-object-format 
      files: {
        'out/ObjectStyle/1.js': ['files1/**/*.ts'],
        'out/ObjectStyle/2.js': ['files2/**/*.ts']
      },
      options: {
        fast: 'never'
      }
    },
    compileTwoSetsOfFilesToDirUsingObjectStyle: {
      // This will run tsc once.  The result of the globs will be passed to tsc with the 
      // --outDir switch as 'out/ObjectStyle'. 
      // see https://github.com/gruntjs/grunt-docs/blob/master/Configuring-tasks.md#files-object-format 
      files: {
        'out/ObjectStyle': ['files1/**/*.ts','files2/**/*.ts']
        },
        options: {
          fast: 'never'
        }
      }
    }
});

Grunt-ts supports compilation of .html file content to TypeScript variables which is explained in detail here. The html target property acts similarly to src, except that it searches for html files to convert to TypeScript variables. See also htmlModuleTemplate and htmlVarTemplate.

// How to use the html target property (incomplete example) 
grunt.initConfig({
  ts: {
    default: {
      html: ["templates/**/*.html"]
    }
  }
});

Note: the html compilation functionality will not fire if the src property is not specified. If you wish to only have the HTML compile to TypeScript without compiling the resulting .ts files to JavaScript, make sure they're excluded from the src globs, or else specify an empty src array alongside the html task property, and set the target compile option to false:

// Example of how to compile html files to TypeScript without compiling the resulting 
// .ts files to JavaScript. 
grunt.initConfig({
  ts: {
    default: {
      html: ["templates/**/*.html"],
      src: [],
      options: {
        compile: false
      }
    }
  }
});

This section allows global configuration for the grunt-ts task. All target-specific options are supported. If a target also has options set, the target's options override the global task options.

Passes the --out switch to tsc. This will cause the emitted JavaScript to be concatenated to a single file if your code allows for that.

Note - the sequence of concatenation when using namespaces (formerly called internal modules) is usually significant. You can assist TypeScript to order the emitted JavaScript correctly by changing the sequence in which files appear in your glob. For example, if you have a.ts, b.ts, and c.ts and use the glob '*.ts, the default would be for TypeScript to concatenate the files in alphabetical order. If you needed the content from b.ts to appear first, and then the rest in alphabetical order, you could specify the glob like this: ['b.ts','*.ts'].

Note - the out feature should not be used in combination with module because the TypeScript compiler does not support concatenation of external modules; consider using a module bundler like WebPack, Browserify, or Require's r.js to concatenate external modules.

grunt.initConfig({
  ts: {
    default: {
      out: "dist/myscript.js"
    }
  }
});

Warning: Using the compiler with out and reference will prevent grunt-ts from using its fast compile feature. Consider using external modules with transforms instead.

Passes the --outDir switch to tsc. This will redirect the emitted JavaScript to the specified directory and subdirectories.

grunt.initConfig({
  ts: {
    default: {
      outDir: "dist"
    }
  }
});

Grunt-ts can automatically generate a TypeScript file containing a reference to all other found .ts files. This means that the developer will not need to cross-reference each of their TypeScript files manually; instead, they can just reference the single reference file in each of their code files.

grunt.initConfig({
  ts: {
    default: {
      src: ["references.ts","some/other/path/**/*.ts"],
      reference: "references.ts"
    }
  }
});

Note: the TypeScript file identified in the reference property must be included in the src or files property in the Grunt target, or reference won't work (either directly or via wildcard/glob).

Note: It is not supported to use reference with files.

Warning: Using the compiler with out and reference will prevent grunt-ts from using its fast compile feature. Consider using external modules with transforms instead.

Allows you to specify the TypeScript files that will be passed to the compiler. Supports standard GruntJS functionality such as globbing. More info at Configuring GruntJS Tasks](http://gruntjs.com/configuring-tasks#files).

grunt.initConfig({
  ts: {
    default: {
      src: ["app/**/*.ts"]
    }
  }
});

Grunt-ts can use the TypeScript compilation settings from a Visual Studio project file (.csproj or .vbproj).

In the simplest use case, specify a string identifying the Visual Studio project file name in the vs target property. Grunt-ts will extract the TypeScript settings last saved into the project file and compile the TypeScript files identified in the project in the manner specified by the Visual Studio project's configuration.

grunt.initConfig({
  ts: {
    default: {
      vs: 'test/vsproj/testproject.csproj'
    }
  }
});

If more control is desired, you may pass the vs target property as an object literal with the following properties:

  • project: (string, mandatory) the relative path (from the gruntfile.js) to the Visual Studio project file.
  • config: (string, optional, default = '') the Visual Studio project configuration to use (allows choosing a different project configuration than the one currently in-use/saved in Visual Studio).
  • ignoreFiles: (boolean, optional, default = false) Will ignore the files identified in the Visual Studio project. This is useful if you want to keep your command-line build settings synchronized with the project's TypeScript Build settings, but want to specify a custom set of files to compile in your own src glob. If not specified or set to false, the TypeScript files referenced in the Visual Studio project will be compiled in addition to any files identified in the src target property.
  • ignoreSettings: (boolean, optional, default = false) Will ignore the compile settings identified in the Visual Studio project. If specified, grunt-ts will follow its normal behavior and use any TypeScript build settings specified on the target or its defaults.

All features of grunt-ts other than files, are compatible with the vs target property. If you wish to add more files to the compilation than are referenced in the Visual Studio project, the src grunt-ts property can be used; any files found in the glob are added to the compilation list (grunt-ts will resolve duplicates). All other target properties and target options specified in the gruntfile.js will override the settings in the Visual Studio project file. For example, if you were referencing a Visual Studio project configuration that had source maps enabled, specifying sourcemap: false in the gruntfile.js would keep all other Visual Studio build settings, but disable generation of source maps.

Note: Using the vs target property with files is not supported.

Example: Use all compilation settings specified in the "Release" TypeScript configuration from the project, but compile only the TypeScript files in the lib subfolder to a single file in the built folder.

grunt.initConfig({
  ts: {
    CompileMyLibsOnly: {
      src: 'MyProject/lib/**/*.ts',
      out: 'built/mylibs.js',
      vs: {
        project: 'MyProject/MyProject.csproj',
        ignoreFiles: true,
        config: 'Release'
      }
    }
  }
});

If you wish to disable the Visual Studio built-in TypeScript build, but keep the Visual Studio project properties TypeScript Build pane working, follow these instructions.

Grunt-ts can watch a directory and recompile TypeScript files when any TypeScript or HTML file is changed, added, or removed. Use the watch target option specifying a target directory that will be watched. All subdirectories are automatically included.

Note: this feature does not allow for additional tasks to run after the compilation step is done - for that you should use grunt-contrib-watch.

grunt.initConfig({
  ts: {
    default: {
      watch: "."  //will re-run this task if any .ts or .html file is changed. 
    }
  }
});

Allows passing arbitrary strings to the compiler. This is intended to enable compatibility with features not supported directly by grunt-ts. The parameters will be passed exactly as-is with a space separating them from the previous switches. It is possible to pass more than one switch with additionalFlags by separating them with spaces.

grunt.initConfig({
  ts: {
    default: {
      options: {
        additionalFlags: '--autoFixBugs --gruntTs "is awesome!"'
      }
    }
  }
});

Allows use of ES6 "default" import syntax with pre-ES6 modules when not using SystemJS. If using module format "amd", "commonjs" or "umd", the following import syntax for jQuery will give the error "Module 'jquery' has no default export" when exporting to "amd", "commonjs", or "umd" format: import * as $ from 'jquery';. In that case, passing allowSyntheticDefaultImports will eliminate this error. NOTE: This is the default behavior when SystemJS module format is used (module: "system"). This switch (and behavior) requires TypeScript 1.8 or higher. See this issue for more details.

grunt.initConfig({
  ts: {
    default: {
      options: {
        allowSyntheticDefaultImports: true,
        module: 'umd'
      }
    }
  }
});

When using TypeScript >= 1.5 (most common), use rootDir instead.

When using fast compile with outDir, tsc won't guarantee the output directory structure will match the source structure. Setting baseDir helps to ensure the original source structure is mapped to the output directory. This will create a .baseDir.ts file in the baseDir location. A .baseDir.js and .baseDir.js.map will be created in the outDir.

grunt.initConfig({
  ts: {
    default: {
      outDir: 'dist',
      options: {
        baseDir: 'src',
        fast: always
      }
    }
  }
});
true (default)false

Indicates if the TypeScript compilation should be attempted. Turn this off if you wish to just run transforms.

grunt.initConfig({
  ts: {
    default: {
      options: {
        compile: false
      }
    }
  }
});

This target option allows the developer to select an alternate TypeScript compiler.

By default, grunt-ts will use the TypeScript compiler that came bundled with it. Alternate compilers can be used by this target option (for custom compiler builds) or using package.json (for npm released version of typescript).

To use a custom compiler, update your gruntfile.js file with this code:

grunt.initConfig({
  ts: {
    options: {
      compiler: './node_modules/grunt-ts/customcompiler/tsc'
    }
  }
});

Download custom compilers from the current TypeScript repository on GitHub or the old TypeScript repository on CodePlex and extract it to a folder in your project. The compiler will be in the bin folder. Copy all of the files to your project folder and then reference tsc using the compiler task option. For example, if you extracted everything to a mycompiler folder in your project, you'd set the grunt-ts compiler property to './mycompiler/tsc'.

In the absence of a compiler argument, grunt-ts will look for an alternate compiler in its peer node_modules folder (where grunt-ts and typescript are peers).

The package.json would look something like this for a legacy project:

{
  "devDependencies": {
    "grunt" : "~0.4.1",
    "grunt-ts" : "~1.9.2",
    "typescript" : "0.9.7"
  }
}

Note: It is safest to pin the exact TypeScript version (do not use ~ or >).

true | false (default)

Retains comments in the emitted JavaScript if set to true. Removes comments if set to false. Note that if comments and removeComments are both used, the value of removeComments will win; regardless, please don't do this as it is just confusing to everyone.

grunt.initConfig({
  ts: {
    options: {
      comments: true //preserves comments in output. 
    }
  }
});
true | false (default)

Generates corresponding .d.ts file(s) for compiled TypeScript files.

grunt.initConfig({
  ts: {
    options: {
      declaration: true
    }
  }
});
true | false (default)

Set to true to pass --emitDecoratorMetadata to the compiler. If set to true, TypeScript will emit type information about type and parameter decorators, so it's available at runtime.

Used by tools like Angular. You will probably need to import the reflect-metadata package in your app when using this feature.

This is only available in TypeScript 1.5 and higher. If enabled, will automatically enable experimentalDecorators

grunt.initConfig({
  ts: {
    options: {
      emitDecoratorMetadata: true
    }
  }
});
true | false (default)

Set to true to emit events in Grunt upon significant events in grunt-ts. This is used by the task validate_failure_count in the Gruntfile.js of grunt-ts itself. Currently, the only supported event is grunt-ts.failure which will be raised upon a failed build if emitGruntEvents is true. This is only available in grunt-ts 5.2.0 or higher.

grunt.initConfig({
  ts: {
    options: {
      emitGruntEvents: true
    }
  }
});

Example usage:

grunt.event.on('grunt-ts.failure', function() {
    console.log('It failed!!!!!!');
});
true | false (default)

Enable support for experimental ES7 async functionality. This is only available in TypeScript 1.6 and higher in 'es6' mode.

grunt.initConfig({
  ts: {
    options: {
      experimentalAsyncFunctions: true,
      target: 'es6'
    }
  }
});
true | false (default)

Enable support for experimental ES7 decorators. This is only available in TypeScript 1.5 and higher.

grunt.initConfig({
  ts: {
    options: {
      experimentalDecorators: true
    }
  }
});
true (default) | false

TypeScript has two types of errors: emit preventing and non-emit preventing. Generally, type errors do not prevent the JavaScript emit. Therefore, it can be useful to allow the Grunt pipeline to continue even if there are type errors because tsc will still generate JavaScript.

If failOnTypeErrors is set to false, grunt-ts will not halt the Grunt pipeline if a TypeScript type error is encountered. Note that syntax errors or other general tsc errors will always halt the pipeline.

grunt.initConfig({
  ts: {
    options: {
      failOnTypeErrors: true
    }
  }
});
"watch" (default) | "always" | "never"

If you are using external modules, grunt-ts will try to do a fast compile by default, basically only compiling what's changed. It should "just work" with the built-in file watching as well as with external tools like grunt-contrib-watch.

To do a fast compile, grunt-ts maintains a cache of hashes for TypeScript files in the .tscache folder to detect changes (needed for external watch tool support). It also creates a .baseDir.ts file at the root, passing it to the compiler to make sure that --outDir is always respected in the generated JavaScript.

You can customize the behaviour of grunt-ts fast.

If you are using files, grunt-ts can't do a fast compile. You should set fast to 'never'.

grunt.initConfig({
  ts: {
    options: {
      // disable the grunt-ts fast feature 
      fast: 'never'
    }
  }
});

Grunt-ts supports compilation of .html file content to TypeScript variables which is explained in detail here. The htmlModuleTemplate target property allows the developer to define a namespace for the templates. See also html and htmlVarTemplate.

//Note: incomplete - combine with html and htmlVarTemplate 
grunt.initConfig({
  ts: {
    default: {
      options: {
        //MyTemplate.html will be accessible as HtmlTemplates.MyTemplate 
        htmlModuleTemplate: 'HtmlTemplates.<%= filename %>'
      }
    }
  }
});

Grunt-ts supports compilation of .html file content to TypeScript variables which is explained in detail here. The htmlVarTemplate target property allows the developer to define a property name for the template contents. See also html and htmlModuleTemplate.

//Note: incomplete - combine with html and htmlModuleTemplate 
grunt.initConfig({
  ts: {
    default: {
      options: {
        //HTML template objects will expose their content via a property called markup. 
        htmlVarTemplate: 'markup'
      }
    }
  }
});

Sets a root for output of transformed-to-TypeScript HTML files. See detailed explanation of grunt-ts HTML template support.

//Note: incomplete - combine with html and src/files/etc. 
grunt.initConfig({
  ts: {
    default: {
      options: {
        htmlOutDir: 'generatedHtml'
      }
    }
  }
});

Will flatten the transformed HTML files to a single folder. See detailed explanation of grunt-ts HTML template support.

//Note: incomplete - combine with html and src/files/etc. 
grunt.initConfig({
  ts: {
    default: {
      options: {
        htmlOutDir: 'generatedHtml',
        htmlOutDirFlatten: true
      }
    }
  }
});

Grunt-ts supports compilation of .html file content to TypeScript variables which is explained in detail here. The htmlOutputTemplate target property allows the developer to override the internally defined output template to a custom one, useful if one would like to define the HTML output as an external modules, for example.

Three variables can be used in the template, namely:

  • "<%= modulename %>" - This variable will be replaced with the value of the htmlModuleTemplate option.
  • "<%= varname %>" - This variable will be replaced with the value of the htmlVarTemplate option.
  • "<%= content %>" - This variable will be replaced with the content of the HTML file.
//Note: Outputs an external module 
grunt.initConfig({
  ts: {
    default: {
      options: {
        //HTML template objects will expose their content via a property called markup. 
        htmlVarTemplate: 'markup',
        htmlModuleTemplate: 'html',
        htmlOutputTemplate: '/* tslint:disable:max-line-length */ \n\
          export module <%= modulename %> {\n\
              export var <%= varname %> = \'<%= content %>\';\n\
          }\n'
      }
    }
  }
});
true | false (default)

When true, TypeScript will emit source maps inline at the bottom of each JS file, instead of emitting a separate .js.map file. If this option is used with sourceMap, inlineSourceMap will win.

grunt.initConfig({
  ts: {
    default: {
      options: {
        inlineSourceMap: true
      }
    }
  }
});
true | false (default)

When true, TypeScript will emit TypeScript sources "inline". This must be used with either inlineSourceMap or sourceMap. When used with inlineSourceMap, the TypeScript sources and the source map itself are included in a Base64-encoded string in a comment at the end of the emitted JavaScript file. When used with sourceMap, the escaped TypeScript sources are included in the .js.map file itself under a sourcesContent property.

grunt.initConfig({
  ts: {
    default: {
      options: {
        inlineSources: true,
        inlineSourceMap: true
      }
    }
  }
});
true | false (default)

When true, makes scenarios that break single-file transpilation into an error. See https://github.com/Microsoft/TypeScript/issues/2499 for more details. If you are using TypeScript 1.5, and fast compilation, it is ideal to use this to take advantage of future compilation optimizations.

grunt.initConfig({
  ts: {
    default: {
      options: {
        isolatedModules: true
      }
    }
  }
});
`'react'` (default) | `'preserve'`

Specify the JSX code generation style. Documentation is here: TypeScript Wiki - JSX.

grunt.initConfig({
  ts: {
    options: {
      jsx: 'preserve'
    }
  }
});

Specify culture string for error messages - will pass the --locale switch. Requires appropriate TypeScript error messages file to be present (see TypeScript documentation for more details).

grunt.initConfig({
  ts: {
    default: {
      options: {
        locale: "ja-jp"
      }
    }
  }
});

Specifies the root for where .js.map sourcemap files should be referenced. This is useful if you intend to move your .js.map files to a different location. Leave this blank or omit entirely if the .js.map files will be deployed to the same folder as the corresponding .js files. See also sourceRoot.

grunt.initConfig({
  ts: {
    default: {
      options: {
        //When abc.ts is compiled to abc.js, it will reference /maps/abc.js.map 
        mapRoot: "/maps"
      }
    }
  }
});
"amd" | "commonjs" | "system" | "umd" | "es6" | "es2015" | "" (default)

Specifies if TypeScript should emit AMD, CommonJS, SystemJS, "ES6", or UMD-style external modules. Has no effect if internal modules are used. Note - this should not be used in combination with out prior to TypeScript 1.8 because the TypeScript compiler does not support concatenation of external modules; consider using a module bundler like WebPack, Browserify, or Require's r.js to concatenate external modules.

grunt.initConfig({
  ts: {
    default: {
      options: {
        module: "amd"
      }
    }
  }
});
"node" | "classic" (default)

New in TypeScript 1.6. TypeScript is gaining support for resolving definition files using rules similar to common JavaScript module loaders. The first new one is support for CommonJS used by NodeJS, which is why this parameter is called "node" The "node" setting performs an extra check to see if a definition file exists in the node_modules/modulename folder if a TypeScript definition can't be found for an imported module. if this is not desired, set this setting to "classic".

On Defaults. When using --module commonjs the default --moduleResolution will be node. For all other --module options the default is --moduleResolution classic. If specified, the specified value will always be used.

grunt.initConfig({
  ts: {
    default: {
      options: {
        moduleResolution: "classic"
      }
    }
  }
});
"CRLF" | "LF" | "" (default)

Will force TypeScript to use the specified newline sequence. Grunt-ts will also use this newline sequence for transforms. If not specified, TypeScript and grunt-ts use the OS default.

grunt.initConfig({
  ts: {
    default: {
      options: {
        newLine: "CRLF"
      }
    }
  }
});
true | false (default)

Set to true to pass --noEmit to the compiler. If set to true, TypeScript will not emit JavaScript regardless of if the compile succeeds or fails.

grunt.initConfig({
  ts: {
    default: {
      options: {
        noEmit: true
      }
    }
  }
});
true | false (default)

Set to true to pass --noEmitHelpers to the compiler. If set to true, TypeScript will not emit JavaScript helper functions such as __extends. This is for very advanced users who wish to provide their own implementation of the TypeScript runtime helper functions.

grunt.initConfig({
  ts: {
    default: {
      options: {
        noEmitHelpers: true
      }
    }
  }
});
true | false (default)

Set to true to pass --noEmitOnError to the compiler. If set to true, TypeScript will not emit JavaScript if there is a type error. This flag does not affect the Grunt pipeline; to force the Grunt pipeline to continue (or halt) in the presence of TypeScript type errors, see failOnTypeErrors.

grunt.initConfig({
  ts: {
    default: {
      options: {
        noEmitOnError: true
      }
    }
  }
});
true | false (default)

Set to true to pass --noImplicitAny to the compiler. Requires more strict type checking. If noImplicitAny is enabled, TypeScript will raise a type error whenever it is unable to infer the type of a variable. By default, grunt-ts will halt the Grunt pipeline on type errors. See failOnTypeErrors for more info.

grunt.initConfig({
  ts: {
    default: {
      options: {
        noImplicitAny: true
      }
    }
  }
});
true | false (default)

Specify this option if you do not want the lib.d.ts to be loaded by the TypeScript compiler. Generally this is used to allow you to manually specify your own lib.d.ts.

grunt.initConfig({
  ts: {
    default: {
      options: {
        noLib: true
      }
    }
  }
});
true | false (default)

Do not add triple-slash references or module import targets to the list of compiled files.

grunt.initConfig({
  ts: {
    options: {
      noResolve: true
    }
  }
});
true | false (default)

Set to true to pass --preserveConstEnums to the compiler. If set to true, TypeScript will emit code that allows other JavaScript code to use the enum. If false (the default), TypeScript will inline the enum values as magic numbers with a comment in the emitted JS.

grunt.initConfig({
  ts: {
    default: {
      options: {
        preserveConstEnums: true
      }
    }
  }
});
true (default)false

Removes comments in the emitted JavaScript if set to true. Preserves comments if set to false. Note that if comments and removeComments are both used, the value of removeComments will win; regardless, please don't do this as it is just confusing to everyone.

grunt.initConfig({
  ts: {
    options: {
      removeComments: false //preserves comments in output. 
    }
  }
});
string

Affects the creation of folders inside the outDir location. rootDir allows manually specifying the desired common root folder when used in combination with outDir. Otherwise, TypeScript attempts to calculate this automatically. Not specifying rootDir can result in outDir not matching structure of src folder when using fast compilation. baseDir provides a poor man's version of rootDir for those using TypeScript < 1.5.

grunt.initConfig({
  ts: {
    options: {
      rootDir: "src/app"
    }
  }
});
true (default) | false

If true, grunt-ts will instruct tsc to emit source maps (.js.map files). If this option is used with inlineSourceMap, inlineSourceMap will win.

grunt.initConfig({
  ts: {
    default: {
      options: {
        sourceMap: true
      }
    }
  }
});

The sourceRoot to use in the emitted source map files. Allows mapping moved .js.map files back to the original TypeScript files. See also mapRoot.

grunt.initConfig({
  ts: {
    default: {
      options: {
        sourceRoot: "/dev"
      }
    }
  }
});

Use stripInternal to prevent the emit of members marked as @internal via a comment. For example:

/* @internal */
export class MyClass {
}
grunt.initConfig({
  ts: {
    default: {
      options: {
        sourceRoot: "/dev"
      }
    }
  }
});
true | false (default)

Set to true to disable strict object literal assignment checking (experimental). See https://github.com/Microsoft/TypeScript/pull/4484 for more details.

grunt.initConfig({
  ts: {
    default: {
      options: {
        suppressExcessPropertyErrors: true
      }
    }
  }
});
true | false (default)

Set to true to pass --suppressImplicitAnyIndexErrors to the compiler. If set to true, TypeScript will allow access to properties of an object by string indexer when --noImplicitAny is active, even if TypeScript doesn't know about them. This setting has no effect unless --noImplicitAny is active.

grunt.initConfig({
  ts: {
    default: {
      options: {
        suppressImplicitAnyIndexErrors: true,
        noImplicitAny: true
      }
    }
  }
});

For example, the following code would not compile with --noImplicitAny alone, but it would be legal with --noImplicitAny and --suppressImplicitAnyIndexErrors both enabled:

interface person {
    name: string;
}
 
var p : person = { name: "Test" };
p["age"] = 101;  //property age does not exist on interface person.
console.log(p["age"]);
true | false (default)

Set to true to pass --emitDecoratorMetadata to the compiler. If set to true, TypeScript will emit type information about type and parameter decorators, so it's available at runtime.

Used by tools like Angular. You will probably need to import the reflect-metadata package in your app when using this feature.

"es5" (default) | "es3" | "es6"

Allows the developer to specify if they are targeting ECMAScript version 3, 5, or 6. Support for es6 emit was added in TypeScript 1.4 and is listed as experimental. Only select ES3 if you are targeting old browsers (IE8 or below). The default for grunt-ts (es5) is different than the default for tsc (es3).

grunt.initConfig({
  ts: {
    default: {
      options: {
        target: "es3" //for IE8 and below 
      }
    }
  }
});

Grunt-ts can integrate with a tsconfig.json file in three ways which offer different behavior:

  • As a boolean: simplest way for default behavior.
  • As a string: still uses defaults, but allows specifying a specific path to the tsconfig.json file or the containing folder.
  • As an object: allows detailed control over how grunt-ts works with tsconfig.json

When specifying tsconfig as a boolean In this scenario, grunt-ts will use all settings from the tsconfig.json file in the same folder as Gruntfile.js.

  • If a filesGlob property is present in the tsconfig.json file:
    • It will be evaluated, and any identified files will be added to the compilation context.
    • If a files property is present, it will be modified with the result from evaluating the filesGlob that is present inside tsconfig.json (the files element will not be updated with the results from any glob inside Gruntfile.js).
    • If exclude is present, it will be ignored.
  • If a filesGlob property is NOT present, but files is present:
    • Any files specified in files will be added to the compilation context.
    • If exclude is present, it will be ignored.
  • If neither filesGlob nor files is present:
    • All *.ts and *.tsx files in all subfolders will be added to the compilation context, excluding any subfolders specified in the optional exclude property.
  • If a glob is also specified in the Gruntfile.js, grunt-ts will NOT update the filesGlob in the tsconfig.json file with it nor will those files be added to the tsconfig.json files element.
  • The tsconfig property should function correctly as either a task option or a target property.
  • If the tsconfig.json file does not exist or there is a parse error, compilation will be aborted with an error.
grunt.initConfig({
  ts: {
    default: {
      // specifying tsconfig as a boolean will use the 'tsconfig.json' in same folder as Gruntfile.js 
      tsconfig: true
    }
  }
});

When specifying tsconfig as a string This scenario follows the same behavior as specifying tsconfig.json as a boolean, except that it is possible to use an explicit file name. If a directory name is provided instead, grunt-ts will use tsconfig.json in that directory. The path to tsconfig.json (or the directory that contains it) is relative to Gruntfile.js.

grunt.initConfig({
  ts: {
    default: {
      // specifying tsconfig as a string will use the specified `tsconfig.json` file. 
      tsconfig: './some/path/to/tsconfig.json'
    }
  }
});

When specifying tsconfig as an object This provides the most control over how grunt-ts integrates with tsconfig.json. Supported properties are:

  • tsconfig: string (optional) - if absent, will default to tsconfig.json in same folder as Gruntfile.js. If a folder is passed, will use tsconfig.json in that folder.
  • ignoreFiles: boolean (optional) - default is false. If true, will not inlcude files in files array from tsconfig.json in the compilation context.
  • ignoreSettings: boolean (optional) - default is false. If true, will ignore compilerOptions section in tsconfig.json (will only use settings from Gruntfile.js or grunt-ts defaults)
  • overwriteFilesGlob: boolean (optional) - default is false. If true, will overwrite the contents of the filesGlob array with the contents of the src glob from grunt-ts.
  • updateFiles: boolean (optional) - default is true. Will modify the files array in tsconfig.json to match the result of evaluating a filesGlob that is present inside tsconfig.json (the files element will not be updated with the results from any glob inside Gruntfile.js unless overwriteFilesGlob is also true).
  • passThrough: boolean (optional) - default is false. If passThrough is true, grunt-ts will run TypeScript (tsc) with the specified tsconfig folder, passing the --project option only (and anything in additionalFlags). This provides support for custom compilers with custom implementations of tsconfig.json support. Note: Since this entirely depends on support from tsc, the tsconfig option must be a directory (not a file) as of TypeScript 1.6.
grunt.initConfig({
  ts: {
    default: {
      // specifying tsconfig as an object allows detailed configuration overrides... 
      tsconfig: {
        tsconfig: './SomeOtherFolder/tsconfig.json',
        ignoreFiles: false,
        ignoreSettings: false,
        overwriteFilesGlob: false,
        updateFiles: true,
        passThrough: false
      }
    }
  }
});
 
 
  • Globs in filesGlob in tsconfig.json are relative to the tsconfig.json, not the Gruntfile.js.
  • tsconfig has a restriction when used with files in the Grunt task configuration: overwriteFilesGlob is NOT supported if files has more than one element. This will abort compilation.
  • If files is absent in tsconfig.json, but filesGlob is present, grunt-ts will create and update the files array in tsconfig.json as long as updateFiles is true (the default). Since files will be created in this scenario, any values in the exclude array will be ignored.
  • This feature may be used along with the vs keyword. Any settings found in tsconfig.json will override any settings found in the Visual Studio project file. Any files referenced in the Visual Studio file that are not also referenced in tsconfig.json will be included in the compilation context after any files from tsconfig.json (any files from src but not in vs or tsconfig will be included after that). The order of the files in tsconfig.json will override the order of the files in the VS project file.
false (default) | true

Will print the switches passed to tsc on the console. Helpful for debugging.

grunt.initConfig({
  ts: {
    default: {
      options: {
        verbose: true
      }
    }
  }
});

Objective: To allow for easier code refactoring by taking relative path maintenance burden off the developer. If the path to a referenced file changes, grunt-ts will regenerate the relevant lines.

Transforms begin with a three-slash comment /// and are prefixed with ts:. When grunt-ts is run against your TypeScript file, it will add a new line with the appropriate TypeScript code to reference the file, or it will generate a comment indicating that the file you referenced could not be found.

For example, if you put this in your code:

///ts:ref=mylibrary

The next time grunt-ts runs, it might change that line to this:

///ts:ref=mylibrary
/// <reference path='../path/to/mylibrary.d.ts'/> ///ts:ref:generated

Important Note: All transforms require the searched-for file to be included in the result of the files, src, or vs Grunt globs. Grunt-ts will only search within the results that Grunt has identified; it does not go searching through your disk for files!

You can also run transforms without compiling your code by setting compile: false in your config. For example:

grunt.initConfig({
  ts: {
    "transforms-only": {
      options: {
        compile: false
      },
      // in addition to your standard settings: 
      // src: ... 
      // outDir: ... 
    },
    // ... 
  }
} );
///ts:import=<fileOrDirectoryName>[,<variableName>]

This will generate the relevant import foo = require('./path/to/foo'); code without you having to figure out the relative path.

If a directory is provided, the entire contents of the directory will be imported. However if a directory has a file index.ts inside of it, then instead of importing the entire folder only index.ts is imported.

Import file:

///ts:import=filename
import filename = require('../path/to/filename'); ///ts:import:generated

Import file with an alternate name:

///ts:import=BigLongClassName,foo
import foo = require('../path/to/BigLongClassName'); ///ts:import:generated

Import directory:

///ts:import=directoryName
import filename = require('../path/to/directoryName/filename'); ///ts:import:generated
import anotherfile = require('../path/to/directoryName/deeper/anotherfile'); ///ts:import:generated
...

Import directory that has an index.ts file in it:

///ts:import=directoryName
import directoryName = require('../path/to/directoryName/index'); ///ts:import:generated

See Exports for examples of how grunt-ts can generate an index.ts file for you

///ts:export=<fileOrDirectoryName>[,<variableName>]

This is similar to ///ts:import but will generate export import foo = require('./path/to/foo'); and is very useful for generating indexes of entire module directories when using external modules (which you should always be using).

Export file:

///ts:export=filename
export import filename = require('../path/to/filename'); ///ts:export:generated

Export file with an alternate name:

///ts:export=filename,foo
export import foo = require('../path/to/filename'); ///ts:export:generated

Export directory:

///ts:export=dirName
export import filename = require('../path/to/dirName/filename'); ///ts:export:generated
export import anotherfile = require('../path/to/dirName/deeper/anotherfile'); ///ts:export:generated
...
///ts:ref=<fileName>

This will generate the relevant /// <references path="./path/to/foo" /> code without you having to figure out the relative path.

Note: grunt-ts only searches through the enumerated results of the src or files property in the Grunt target. The referenced TypeScript file must be included for compilation (either directly or via wildcard/glob) or the transform won't work. This is so that grunt-ts doesn't go searching through your whole drive for files.

Reference file:

///ts:ref=filename
/// <reference path='../path/to/filename'/> ///ts:ref:generated

When a output file is specified via out in combination with a reference file via reference then grunt-ts uses the generated reference file to order the code in the generated JavaScript.

Use reference.ts to specify the order for the few files the build really cares about and leave the rest to be maintained by grunt-ts.

E.g. in the following case the generated JavaScript for someBaseClass.ts is guaranteed to be at the top, and the generated JavaScript for main.ts is guaranteed to be at the bottom of the single merged js file.

Everything between grunt-start and grunt-end is generated and maintained by grunt-ts. If there is no grunt-start section found, it is created. If reference.ts does not exist originally, it is also created.

/// <reference path="someBaseClass.ts" />
 
// Put comments here and they are preserved
 
//grunt-start
/// <reference path="autoreference.ts" />
/// <reference path="someOtherFile.ts" />
//grunt-end
 
 
/// <reference path="main.ts" />

As of grunt-ts v2.0.2, If you wish to standardize the line endings used by grunt-ts transforms, you can set the grunt.util.linefeed property in your gruntfile.js to the desired standard line ending for the grunt-ts managed TypeScript files.

module.exports = function(grunt) {
 
  grunt.util.linefeed = '\r\n';  // this would standardize on CRLF 
 
  /* rest of config */
};

Note that it is not currently possible to force TypeScript to emit all JavaScript with a particular line ending, but a switch to allow that is under discussion here: https://github.com/Microsoft/TypeScript/issues/1693

TypeScript programming using grunt-ts (YouTube):

AngularJS + TypeScript : Workflow with grunt-ts (YouTube)

Licensed under the MIT License.