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    ferp

    2.1.2 • Public • Published

    ferp

    Ferp is the easiest, functional-reactive, zero dependency javascript app framework for nodejs and modern browsers.

    But...what is it?

    • Presentation Agnostic - Tie this into your favorite front-end libraries like React and Vue, or commandline tasks like an interactive prompt or sever.
    • Functional+Reactive - Makes it easy to test, control side effects, and keep things immutable.
    • Simple - Everything is standard javascript, there is no misdirection or magic.

    What it isn't

    • A vdom implementation - You have to provide your own presentation layer. But the good news is, you can basically pick any one you want.
    • A new language - This isn't like Elm, in the sense of the language. You can always bring this into typescript, but I don't plan on supporting any other languages out of the box.

    Where did this come from

    Like any great idea, it's based on other (much smarter) people's work, namely:

    • Evan Czaplicki's Elm, the language that made me see the power of the dark side functional reactive programming.
    • Jorge Bucaran's hyperapp, a tiny but powerful functional front-end framework.

    Installing

    npm install --save ferp

    Or grab it from unpkg

    <script src="https://unpkg.com/ferp"></script>
    <script>
      const { ferp } = window;
    </script>
    

    Importing

    // es6
    import { app, effects } from 'ferp';
    
    // unpkg
    import { app, effects } from 'https://unpkg.com/ferp?module=1';
    
    // from a script tag
    // <script src="https://unpkg.com/ferp"></script>
    const { app, effects } = window.ferp;
    
    // es5/node
    const { app, effects } = require('ferp');

    Migrating from 0.x to 1.x

    See this handy migration guide!

    Creating an app

    Here's an app that infinitely adds a counter, and logs it.

    const ferp = require('ferp');
    
    const initialState = 0;
    
    const incrementAction = (state) => [state + 1, ferp.effects.act(incrementAction)];
    
    ferp.app({
      init: [initialState, ferp.effects.act(incrementAction)],
    });

    Quick anatomy of an app

    Every app needs an init tuple, with the initial state, and initial side effect (or ferp.effects.none() if there isn't one). There is also a subscribe method for managing long-term side-effects, like intervals or websocket communication, and observe to watch for application changes.

    You can read more about setting up an application here in the docs.

    More docs

    Still have questions?

    Install

    npm i ferp

    DownloadsWeekly Downloads

    1

    Version

    2.1.2

    License

    MIT

    Unpacked Size

    75.6 kB

    Total Files

    24

    Last publish

    Collaborators

    • mrozbarry