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express-modularity

1.1.8 • Public • Published

express-modularity

A React-like modular routing solution for Express.js applications.

const modularity = require('express-modularity')
modularity.call('routes')
app.use(modularity.router)

Installation

This is a Node.js module available through the npm registry. It is meant to work with Express.js applications.

Before installing, download and install Node.js. Node.js 0.10 or higher is required.

Installation is done using the npm install command:

npm install express-modularity

Quick Start

With express-modularity, you can create multiple route files within a predetermined directory of your application and easily include global middleware functions.

Here is a basic example where we've determined that our route directory is 'routes' and is located at the base directory of our application:

const modularity = require('express-modularity')
modularity.call('routes')
app.use(modularity.router)

Here we are doing three things:

  1. Requiring the module in our application
  2. Calling the modularity module on the 'routes' directory
  3. Using the updated Express router in our application

Directory Structure

The directory containing the routes (i.e. 'routes' above) needs to exist in the root directory of the application. That means that your application should look something like this:

my-application/
    app.js
    ...
    routes/
        home.js
        about.js
        contact.js

Middleware

All subdirectories inside of 'routes' (or whatever you choose to call your routes directory) will be treated as nested directories (see below) except for the following:

* middleware
* components
* global
* any directory beginning with _

These three directories will be ignored and can be used for your middleware and other components to be included in your route files.

Nested Directories

Other directories not named middleware, components or global will be treated as nested and will only be accessible to the front-end user via the directory name.

For example, with a directory structure like this:

my-application/
    app.js
    ...
    routes/
        home.js
        about.js
        contact.js
        admin/
            login.js
            pages.js

the home, about and contact route files will be accessible directly after the top-level domain name:

* example.com
* example.com/about
* example.com/contact

but the login and pages routes will only be accessible via the directory admin after the TLD:

* example.com/admin/login
* example.com/admin/pages

You can add as many of these nested directories as you'd like.

Global Middleware

If you have middleware that you'd like to run in every route, you can include it as global middleware by exporting it as a module within the global directory (NEW as of 1.1.8: global OR _global).

For example, with a directory structure like this:

my-application/
    app.js
    ...
    routes/
        home.js
        about.js
        global/
            logErrors.js
        admin/
            login.js
            pages.js
            global/
                restrict.js

the middleware exported from logErrors.js will be run in the home and about route files as well as all nested directories within the main routes folder.

In the admin directory, restrict.js is declared as global middleware and will be run in the login and pages route files, but not the home or about route files.

Gotchas

Here are a few things to keep in mind when using express-modularity in your application:

  1. Other than nested directories requiring the directory name, the file names do not determine the front-end URLs. For example, the file 'about.js' will be accessed by the Express routing determined in the file, not by the name of the file 'about' like 'example.com/about'. Because of this, you can include multiple Express routes inside files as they are just a way to modularize your code.
  2. File names starting with a period (.) will be ignored. Everything else will be considered.
  3. Keep in mind that all global middleware called in a directory will also be used in all routes included within sub-nested directories.

People

The author and maintainer of express-modularity is Tyler Willis. Support me on Patreon!

Keywords

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Install

npm i express-modularity

DownloadsWeekly Downloads

4

Version

1.1.8

License

ISC

Unpacked Size

6.34 kB

Total Files

3

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