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cloudworker-proxy
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1.16.1 • Public • Published

cloudworker-proxy

An api gateway for cloudflare workers with configurable handlers for:

  • Routing
    • Load balancing of http endpoints
    • Routing based on client Geo, host, path and protocol
    • Invoking AWS lambdas and google cloud functions
    • S3 buckets
    • Static responses from config or Cloudflare KV-Storage
    • Splitting requests to multiple endpoints
  • Logging (http, kinesis)
  • Authentication (basic, oauth2, signature)
  • Rate limiting
  • Caching
  • Rewrite
    • Modifying headers
    • Adding cors headers
    • Replacing or inserting content

Installing

Installing via NPM:

npm install cloudworker-proxy --save

Concept

The proxy is a pipeline of different handlers that processes each request. The handlers in the pipeline could be:

  • Middleware. Such as logging or authentication that typically passes on the request further down the pipeline
  • Origins. Fetches content from other services, for instance using http.
  • Tranforms. Modifies the content before passing it back to the client

Each handler can specify rules for which hosts and paths it should apply to, so it's possible to for instance only apply authentication to certain requests.

The examples are deployed at https://proxy.cloudproxy.io

Usage

A proxy is instantiated with a set of middlewares, origins and transforms that are matched against each request based on hostname, method, path, protocol and headers. Each rule is configured to execute one of the predefined handlers. The handlers could either terminate the request and send the response to the client or pass on the request to the following handlers matching the request.

A simple hello world proxy:

const Proxy = require('cloudworker-proxy');

const config = [{
    handlerName: "response",
    options: {
        body: "Hello world"
    }
}];

const proxy = new Proxy(config);

async function fetchAndApply(event) {
    return await proxy.resolve(event);
}

addEventListener('fetch', (event) => {
  event.respondWith(fetchAndApply(event));
});

A handler can use path, method, host, protocol and headers to match a request. It's also possible to exclude certain paths from matching.

The parameters from the request are resolved in the options, so simpler rewrites like this are possible:

const config = [{
    path: "/hello/:name",
    excludePath: "/hello/markus",
    headers: {
        'Accect': 'text/html',
    },
    protocol: 'https',
    method: ['GET', 'OPTIONS'],
    host: "example.com",
    handlerName: "response",
    options: {
        body: "Hello {name}"
    }
}];

Default Handlers

Ratelimit

Ratelimit the matching requests per minute per IP or for all clients.

The ratelimit keeps the counters in memory so different edge nodes will have separate counters. For IP-based ratelimits it should work just fine as the requests from a client will hit the same edge node.

The ratelimit can have different scopes, so a proxy can have multiple rate-limits for different endpoints.

The ratelimit adds the following headers to the response object:

  • X-Ratelimit-Limit. This is the current limit being enforced
  • X-Ratelimit-Count. The current count of requests being made within the window
  • X-Ratelimit-Reset. The timeperiod in seconds until the rate limit is reset.

HEAD and OPTIONS requests are not counted against the limit.

An example of the configuration for ratelimit handler:

rules = [{
    handlerName: 'rateLimit',
    options: {
        limit: 1000, // The default allowed calls
        scope: 'default',
        type: 'IP', // Anything except IP will sum up all calls
    }
}];

Logging

The logging handler supports logging of requests and errors to http endpoints such as logz.io and AWS Kinesis.

The logs are sent in chunks to the server. The chunks are sent when the predefined limit of messages are reached or after a certain time, whatever comes first.

An example of configuration for a http logger:

config = [{
    handlerName: 'logger',
    options: {
        type: 'http',
        url: process.env.LOGZ_URL,
        contentType: 'text/plain',
        delimiter: '_',
    },
}];

An example of configuration for a kinesis logger:

config = [{
    handlerName: 'logger',
    options: {
      type: 'kinesis',
      region: 'us-east-1',
      accessKeyId: process.env.AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID,
      secretAccessKey: process.env.AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY,
      streamName: 'cloudworker-proxy',
    },
}];

Basic Auth

Uses basic auth to protect matching rules. The username and authTokens (base64-encoded versions of the passwords) are stored straight in the config which works fine for simple scenarios, but makes adding and removing users hard.

An example of the configuration for the basic auth middleware:

config = [{
    handlerName: 'basicAuth',
    path: '/basic',
    options: {
        users: [
            {
                username: 'test',
                authToken: 'dGVzdDpwYXNzd29yZA==', // "password" Base64 encoded
            }
        ],
    },
}];

Oauth2

Logs in using standard oauth2 providers. So far tested with Auth0, AWS Cognito and Patreon but should work with any.

It stores a session for each user in KV-storage and adds the access token as bearer to the context. The oauth2 handler does not validate the tokens, the validation is handled by the jwt-handler which typically is added after the oauth2-handler.

The redirect back from the oauth2 flow sets a session cookie and stores the access and refresh tokens in KV-storage. By setting the oauth2CallbackType to query the session token will be added to the querystring instead.

The handler by default automaticly redirect the client when it requests any matching resources. If login is optional the allowPublicAccess property can be set to true in which case the login needs to be explicitly triggered using the oauth2LoginPath which defaults to /login. The login endpoint takes a redirectTo query string parameter to determine where the user if redirected after the login flow.

The handler supports the following options:

  • cookieName, the name of the cookie set by the handler. Defaults to 'proxy'
  • cookieHttpOnly, optional property to set if the cookies should be http only (https://owasp.org/www-community/HttpOnly). Defaults to true
  • allowPublicAccess, determines if any requests without valid cookies should be redirected to the login page. Defaults to true
  • kvAccountId, the account id for the KV storage account
  • kvNamespace, the namespace for the KV storage account
  • kvAuthEmail, the email for the KV storage account
  • kvAuthKey, the auth key for the KV storage account
  • kvTtl, the time to live for sessions in the KV storage account. The ttl is reset each time a new access token is fetched. Defaults to 2592000 which is roughly a month
  • oauth2AuthDomain, the base path for the oauth2 provider
  • oauthClientId, the oauth2 client id
  • oauth2ClientSecret, the oauth2 client secret
  • oauth2Audience, the oauth2 audience. This is optional for some providers
  • oauth2Scopes, the oauth2 scopes.
  • oauth2CallbackPath, the path for the callback to the proxy. Defaults to '/callback',
  • oauth2CallbackType, the way the sesion info is communicated back to the client. Can be set to 'cookie' or 'query'. Defaults to 'cookie',
  • oauth2LogoutPath, get requests to this url will causes the session to be closed. Defaults to '/logout',
  • oauth2LoginPath, a url for triggering a new login flow. Defaults to '/login',
  • oauth2ServerTokenPath, the path to the token endpoint on the oauth2 server. Defaults to '/oauth/token',
  • oauth2ServerAuthorizePath, the path for the authorize endpoint on the oauth2 server. Defaults to ''.
  • oauth2ServerLogoutPath, some oauth servers such as auth0 keeps the user logged in using a cookie. By specifying the path the browser will be bounced on the logout endpoint on the oauth provider.

An example of the configuration for the oauth2 handler with auth0:

config = [{
    handlerName: 'oauth2',
    path: '/.*',
    options: {
      oauth2ClientId: <OAUTH2_CLIENT_ID>,
      oauth2ClientSecret: <OAUTH2_CLIENT_SECRET>,
      oauth2AuthDomain: 'https://<auth0-domain>.<auth0-region>.auth0.com,
      oauth2CallbackPath: '/callback', // default value
      oauth2CallbackType: 'cookie', // default value
      oauth2LogoutPath: '/logout', // default value
      oauth2Scopes: ['openid', 'email', 'profile', 'offline_access'],
      oauth2ServerLogoutPath: '/v2/logout',
      kvAccountId: <KV_ACCOUNT_ID>,
      kvNamespace: <KV_NAMESPACE>
      kvAuthEmail: <KV_AUTH_EMAIL>,
      kvAuthKey: <KV_AUTH_KEY>
    },
}];

An example of the configuration for the oauth2 handler with patreon:

config = [  {
    handlerName: 'oauth2',
    path: '/.*',
    options: {
      oauthClientId: <OAUTH2_CLIENT_ID>,
      oauth2ClientSecret: <OAUTH2_CLIENT_SECRET>,
      oauth2AuthDomain: 'https://www.patreon.com,
      oauth2CallbackPath: '/callback', // default value
      oauth2CallbackType: 'cookie', // default value
      oauth2LogoutPath: '/logout', // default value
      oauth2ServerAuthorizePath: '/oauth2',
      oauth2ServerTokenPath: '/api/oauth2/token',
      oauth2Scopes: ["identity"],
      kvAccountId: <KV_ACCOUNT_ID>,
      kvNamespace: <KV_NAMESPACE>
      kvAuthEmail: <KV_AUTH_EMAIL>,
      kvAuthKey: <KV_AUTH_KEY>,
    },
}];

JWT

The jwt handler validates any bearer tokens passed in the authencation headers.

The handler base64 decodes the access token and adds it to the context state as a user object.

An example of the configuration for the jwt handler:

config = [  {
    handlerName: 'jwt',
    path: '/.*',
    options: {
        jwksUri: <url>,
        allowPublicAccess: false, // defaults to false
    },
}];

Signature

Validates a hmac signature that should be available as a sign querystring parameter at the end of the url. If this parameter is not available or incorrect the handler will return a 403 error back to the client.

The signature handler creates a signature based on the path so that a signed url will be valid even if the host changes. So if the https://example.com/foo?bar=test is signed, only the /foo?bar=test is signed and the result would be something like: https://example.com/foo?bar=test&sign=4LQn8AjrvX6NogZ8KDEumw5UClOmE906WmE6vQZdwZU

An example of the configuration for the signature handler:

config = [  {
    handlerName: 'signature',
    path: '/.*',
    options: {
      secret: 'shhhhh....'
    },
}];

The signature can be added in NodeJs using the following snippet:

  const nodeSignature = nodeCrypto
    .createHmac('SHA256', 'shhhhh....')
    .update('path')
    .digest('base64');

Split

Splits the request in two separate requests. The duplicated request will not return any results to the client, but can for instance be used to sample the traffic on a live website or to get webhooks to post to multiple endpoints.

The split handler takes a host parameter that lets you route the requests to a different origin.

An example of the configuration for the split handler:

config = [{
    handlerName: 'split',
    options: {
        host: 'test.example.com',
    },
}];

Response

Returns a static response to the request.

The response handler is configured using a options object that contains the status, body and headers of the response. The body could either be a string or an object.

An example of configuration for a response handler:

const rules = [
  {
    handlerName: "response",
    options: {
      body: "Hello world",
      status: 200,
      headers: {
          'Content-Type': 'text/html'
      }
    }
  }
];

Kv-Storage

The kv-storage handler serves static pages straight from kv-storage using the REST api. The kvKey property specifies which key is used to fetch the data from the key value store. It supports template variables which makes it possible to serve a complete static site with a single rule.

There is a sample script in the script folder to push files to KV-storage.

An example of configuration for a kv-storage handler:

const rules = [
  {
    handlerName: "kvStorage",
    path: /kvStorage/:file*
    options: {
    kvAccountId: <KV_ACCOUNT_ID>,
      kvNamespace: <KV_NAMESPACE>
      kvAuthEmail: <KV_AUTH_EMAIL>,
      kvAuthKey: <KV_AUTH_KEY>,
      kvKey: '{file}', // Default value assuming that the path will use provide a file parameter
      kvBasePath: 'app/', // Fetches the files in the app folder in kv-storage
      defaultExtention: '',  // The default value. Appends .html if no extention is specified on the file
      defaultIndexFile: null, // The file to fetch if the request is made to the root.
      defaultErrorFile: null, // The file to serve if the requested file can't be found in kv-storage
    }
  }
];

It's possible to serve for instance a React app from kv-storage with the following config. The index.html file in the root will be served if a request is made to the root or to any other url where no file can be found in kv-storage.

const rules = [
  {
    handlerName: "kvStorage",
    path: /kvStorage/:file*
    options: {
    kvAccountId: <KV_ACCOUNT_ID>,
      kvNamespace: <KV_NAMESPACE>
      kvAuthEmail: <KV_AUTH_EMAIL>,
      kvAuthKey: <KV_AUTH_KEY>,
      defaultIndexFile: 'index.html', // The file to fetch if the request is made to the root.
      defaultErrorFile: 'index.html', // The file to serve if the requested file can't be found in kv-storage
    }
  }
];

Kv-Storage-Binding

The kv-storage handler serves static pages straight from kv-storage using the in-worker javascript api. This should be slighly faster and should always fetch the data from the closest KV-storage node.

The kvKey property specifies which key is used to fetch the data from the key value store. It supports template variables which makes it possible to serve a complete static site with a single rule.

The in-worker api has support for fetching metadata as part of the Get-request which makes it possible to store Etags, Content-Type and other headers together with the data.

There is a sample script in the script folder to push files to KV-storage.

The handler requires a binding of the KV-Namespace which can be done by adding the following config to the serverless file:

functions:
  cloudworker-proxy-examples:
    name: cloudworker-proxy-examples
    script: 'dist/bundle'
    webpack: false
    resources:
      kv:
        - variable: TEST_NAMESPACE
          namespace: test

When running locally the node-cloudworker shim will make an additional request to the rest-api to fetch the metadata which should give the same result. For this to work the shim needs to be configured with the KV-Storage binding information:

const ncw = require('node-cloudworker');

ncw.applyShims({
  kv: {
    accountId: process.env.KV_ACCOUNT_ID,
    authEmail: process.env.KV_AUTH_EMAIL,
    authKey: process.env.KV_AUTH_KEY,
    bindings: [
      {
        variable: 'TEST_NAMESPACE',
        namespace: process.env.KV_NAMESPACE_TEST,
      },
    ],
  },
});

An example of configuration for a kv-storage handler:

const rules = [
  {
    handlerName: "kvStorage",
    path: /kvStorage/:file*
    options: {
    kvAccountId: <KV_ACCOUNT_ID>,
      kvNamespaceBinding: 'TEST_NAMESPACE',
      kvKey: '{file}', // Default value assuming that the path will use provide a file parameter
      kvBasePath: 'app/', // Fetches the files in the app folder in kv-storage
      defaultExtention: '',  // The default value. Appends .html if no extention is specified on the file
      defaultIndexFile: null, // The file to fetch if the request is made to the root.
      defaultErrorFile: null, // The file to serve if the requested file can't be found in kv-storage
    }
  }
];

CORS

Adds cross origin request headers for a path. The cors handler can optionally take an array of allowed origins to enable cors for.

This is the default configuration for the cors handler

config = [{
    handlerName: 'cors',
    options: {
        allowedOrigins = ['*'],
        allowedMethods = ['GET', 'PUT', 'POST', 'PATCH', 'DELETE', 'HEAD', 'OPTIONS'],
        allowCredentials = true,
        allowedHeaders = ['Content-Type'],
        allowedExposeHeaders = ['WWW-Authenticate', 'Server-Authorization'],
        maxAge = 600,
        optionsSuccessStatus = 204,
        terminatePreflight = false
    }
}];
  • allowedOrigins - Controls Access-Control-Allow-Origin header. Array of allowed Origin domains, or a single item ['*'] if any Origin is allowed.
  • allowedMethods - Controls Access-Control-Allow-Methods header. Array of allowed methods. ['*'] is a valid value.
  • allowCredentials - Controls Access-Control-Allow-Credentials header. Boolean value.
  • allowedHeaders - Controls [Access-Control-Allow-Headers header]. Array of allowed request headers. ['*'] is a valid value.
  • allowedExposeHeaders - Controls Access-Control-Expose-Headers header. Array of allowed exposed headers. Set to ['*'] to allow exposing any headers. Set to [] to allow only the default 7 headers allowed by HTTP spec (see link).
  • maxAge - Constrols Access-Control-Max-Age header. Number of seconds that the CORS headers (Access-Control-*) should be cached by the client. Int value.
  • terminatePreflight - Set to true if you want OPTIONS requests to not be forwarded to origin.
  • optionsSuccessStatus - The HTTP status that should be returned in a preflight request. Only used if terminatePreflight is set to true

Geo-decorator

Adds a proxy-continent header to the request that can be used to route traffic from differnt continent differenty. The followin continents are available:

  • AF, africa
  • AN, antarctica
  • AS, asia
  • EU, europe
  • NA, north america
  • OC, oceania
  • SA, south america

An example of the configuration for geo decoration handler in combination with a response handler targeting Europe:

config = [{
    handlerName: 'geoDecorator',
    path: '/geo',
    options: {},
},
{
    handlerName: 'response',
    path: '/geo',
    headers: {
      'proxy-continent': 'EU',
    },
    options: {
      body: 'This is served to clients in EU',
    },
}];

Cache

Wraps the origin with cloudflare caching and works independent of what origin handler is used. It uses the caching headers set by the origin, but it's also possible to override the cache duration with the cacheDuration option.

It is possible to define a custom cache key template. This makes it possible to vary the cache by for instance user-agent or posted body. The cache key template that can contain the following keys:

  • path
  • metod
  • header:
  • bodyHash

This cache key template will cache seperate entries for requests with diferent origin headers: {method}-{path}-{header:origin}

It is possible to remove certain headers from the cached response by using the headerBlacklist property. By default the following headers are remove from the cached response:

  • x-ratelimit-count
  • x-ratelimit-limit
  • x-ratelimit-reset
  • x-cache-hit

The cache handler respects Range headers. It also support If-Modified-Since and If-None-Match headers to return 304's.

An example of the configuration for cache handler in combination with a S3 handler:

config = [{
    handlerName: 'cache',
    options: {
        cacheDuration: 60,
        headerBlacklist: ['x-my-header']
    },
},
{
    handlerName: 's3',
    path: '/:file',
    options: {
      accessKeyId: process.env.AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID,
      secretAccessKey: process.env.AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY,
      region: 'eu-north-1',
      bucket: 'cloudproxy-test',
      path: '{file}',
    },
}];

This example would cache post requests to a query endpoint using a hash of the query bodys:

 config = [{
    handlerName: "cache",
    path: "/query",
    method: ["OPTIONS", "POST"],
    options: {
      cacheKeyTemplate: "{method}-{path}-{header:referer}-{bodyHash}",
      cacheDuration: 3600,
    },
  },
  {
    handlerName: "loadbalancer",
    path: "/query",
    method: ["OPTIONS", "POST"],
    options: {
      sources: [
        {
          url:
            "https://example.com/query",
        },
      ],
    },
  }]

Load balancer

Load balances requests between one or many endpoints.

Currently the load balancer distributes the load between the endpoints randomly. Use cases for this handler are:

  • Load balance between multiple ingress servers in kubernetes
  • Route trafic to providers that doesn't support custom domains easliy, such as google cloud functions
  • Route trafic to cloud services with nested paths such as AWS Api Gateway or google cloud functions.
  • Route trafic to different endpoints and having flexibility to do updates without changing the origin servers.

In some cases it is necessary to resolve the IP of the endpoint based on a different url than the host header. One example of this is when the load is distributed over multiple load balancer nodes that host multiple domains or subdomains. In these cases it's possible to set the resolveOverride on the load balancer handler. This way it will resolve the IP according to url property of the source, but use the resolveOverride as host header. NOTE: this is only possible if the host is hosted via the cloudflare cdn.

An example of the configuration for loadbalancer with a single source on google cloud functions:


config = [{
  handlerName: 'loadbalancer',
  options: {
    sources: [
        {
          url: 'https://europe-west1-ahlstrand.cloudfunctions.net/hello/{file}'
        }
      ]
    }
}];

An example of the configuration for loadbalancing traffic between two ingresses for multiple hosts, with an override of the host header:

config = [{
  handlerName: 'loadbalancer',
  path: '/:file\*',
  options: {
    "resolveOverride": "www.ahlstrand.es",
    "sources": [
      {
        "url": "https://rancher-ingress-1.ahlstrand.es/{file}"
      },
      {
        "url": "https://rancher-ingress-2.ahlstrand.es/{file}"
      },
    ]
  }
}];

Using path and host parameters the handler can be more generic:


config = [{
  handlerName: 'loadbalancer',
  path: '/:file\*',
  host: ':host.ahlstrand.es',
  options: {
    "resolveOverride": "{host}.ahlstrand.es",
    "sources": [
      {
        "url": "https://rancher-ingress-1.ahlstrand.es/{file}"
      },
      {
        "url": "https://rancher-ingress-2.ahlstrand.es/{file}"
      },
    ]
  }
}];

Requests made by the loadbalancer handler would not be cached when using standard fetch-calls as the source isn't proxied by cloudflare. Instead the handler uses the cache-api to manually store the response in the cloudflare cache. The responses are cached according to the cache-headers. If the ´cacheOverride`-option is added to the loadbalancer it will bypass the cache api and use standard fetch requests.

Origin

Passes the request to the origin for the cdn. This is typically used as a catch all handler to pass all requests that the worker shouldn't handle to origin.

As this wouldn't work when running locall it's possible to specify another host name that will be used for debugging locally.

An example of the configuration for the origin handler:


config = [{
  handlerName: 'origin',
  options: {
    localOriginOverride: 'https://some.origin.com',
  }
}];

S3

Fetches the files from a private S3 bucket using the AWS v4 signatures.

An example of the configuration for the S3 handler:

config = [{
  handlerName: 's3',
  path: '/:file*',
  options: {
    region: 'us-east-1',
    accessKeyId: process.env.AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID,
    secretAccessKey: process.env.AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY,
    path: '{file}'
  }
}];

Lambda

Invoke a AWS lambda using http without the AWS api gateway. The API Gateway from AWS is rather expensive for high load scenarios and using workers as a gateway is almost 10 times cheaper and much more flexible.

An example of the configuration for the lambda handler:


config = [{
  handlerName: 'lambda',
  options: {
    region: 'us-east-1',
    lambdaName: 'lambda-hello-dev-hello',
    accessKeyId: process.env.AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID,
    secretAccessKey: process.env.AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY,
  },
}];

Transform

The transform handler uses regexes to replace text in the responses. It can for instance be used to update relative paths in response from sources hosted on different domains or to insert scripts in web pages.

The transformer in applied as a middleware and hence need to be added before the handler that fetches the data to transform.

The replace parameter can take parameters from the regex match using {{$0}}, where the number is the index of the capturing group.

The current implementation of tranforms have a few limitations:

  • If the size of the response get larger than about 5 MB it will use more cpu than the limit on cloudflare and fail.
  • If the string to be replaced is split between two chunks it won't currently work. The solution is likely to ensure that the chunks always contains complete rows which is sufficient for most cases.

An example of the configuration for the origin handler:


config = [{
  handlerName: 'tranform',
  options: {
    tranforms: [
      {
        regex: 'foo',
        replace: 'bar'
      }
    ]
  }
}];

Custom handlers

It's possible to register custom handlers with new handler names or overriding default handlers by passing an object containing the handlers as second paramter of the proxy constructor:

const proxy = new Proxy(rules, {
  custom: (options) => {
    return async (ctx) => {
      ctx.status = 200;
      ctx.body = 'Custom handler';
    };
  },
});

Security

The handlers for oauth2 stores the encrypted tokens (AES-GCM) in KV-Storage. The key for the encryption is stored in the cookie so that both access to the storage and the cookie is needed to get any tokens.

The tokens entries have a ttl of one month by default, so any token that hasn't been accessed in a month will automatically be removed.

Examples

For more examples of usage see the example folder which contains a complete solution deployed using serverless

Install

npm i cloudworker-proxy

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1.16.1

License

MIT

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