assetmanager

Asset manager easily allows you to switch between development and production css and js files in your templates by managing them in a single json file that's still compatible with grunt cssmin and uglify.

node-assetmanager

Asset manager easily allows you to switch between development and production css and js files in your templates by managing them in a single json file that's still compatible with grunt cssmin and uglify. A working demo/implimentation of this can been seen in MEAN Stack.

##Usage To use assetmanager, cd into your project directory and install assetmanager with npm.

$ cd /to/project/directory
$ npm install assetmanager --save

Setup an external json asset configuration file that holds your development and production css and js files. The format of this file can be in either files object format, or files array format.

You may also add external resources, however these entries should be 1-to-1 key value pairs. External resources will not cause issues with grunt cssmin or uglify, they will simply be treated as empty resources and thus ignored.

###Files Object Format Files object format consists of file groups (main, secondary, etc.) that contain file types (css, js). Each file type has a destination file mapped to a list of files of which the destination file is composed in production mode.

In the assets file below, the main js files might be passed to grunt-contrib-uglify. The output from that Grunt task would be in "public/build/js/main.min.js" - in production mode, assetmanager will place that filename in the list of assets in assets.main.js. In debug mode, assetmanager would flatten the lists of js source files, placing the flattened list in assets.main.js. This makes original, uncompressed js source files available in the browser during debugging.

####assets.json

{
    "main": {
        "css": {
            "public/build/css/main.min.css": [
                "public/lib/bootstrap/dist/css/bootstrap.css",
                "public/css/**/*.css"
            ]
        },
        "js": {
            "//cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/underscore.js/1.6.0/underscore-min.js": "//cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/underscore.js/1.6.0/underscore.js",
            "public/build/js/main.min.js": [
                "public/lib/angular/angular.js",
                "public/lib/angular-cookies/angular-cookies.js",
                "public/lib/angular-resource/angular-resource.js",
                "public/lib/angular-ui-router/release/angular-ui-router.js",
                "public/lib/angular-bootstrap/ui-bootstrap.js",
                "public/lib/angular-bootstrap/ui-bootstrap-tpls.js",
                "public/js/**/*.js"
            ]
        }
    },
    "secondary": {
        "css": {
            "public/build/css/secondary.min.css": [
                "public/css/**/*.css"
            ]
        },
        "js": {
            "public/build/js/secondary.min.js": [
                "public/js/**/*.js"
            ]
        }
    }
}

This way in your gruntfile you can easily import the same assets.json config file and plop in the respective values for css and js.

####gruntfile.js

'use strict';
 
module.exports = function(grunt) {
    // Project Configuration
    grunt.initConfig({
        assets: grunt.file.readJSON('config/assets.json'),
        uglify: {
            main: {
                options: {
                    mangle: true,
                    compress: true
                },
                files: '<%= assets.main.js %>'
            },
            secondary: {
                files: '<%= assets.secondary.js %>'
            }
        },
        cssmin: {
            main: {
                files: '<%= assets.main.css %>'
            },
            secondary: {
                files: '<%= assets.secondary.css %>'
            }
        }
    });
 
    //Load NPM tasks
    grunt.loadNpmTasks('grunt-contrib-cssmin');
    grunt.loadNpmTasks('grunt-contrib-uglify');
 
    //Making grunt default to force in order not to break the project.
    grunt.option('force', true);
 
    //Default task(s).
    grunt.registerTask('default', ['cssmin', 'uglify']);
 
};

###Files Array Format Files array format requires that each file type be an object with "src" (string array or string) and "dest" (string) attributes.

This format allows configuring a single Grunt target with multiple destinations. For example, perhaps you'd like to concatenate vendor minified css and js files in production. Both sets should have their own destination file as illustrated in the assets configuration below with "vendorCss" and "vendorJs" file types.

####assets.js - array format

{
    "main": {
        "vendorCss": {
            "dest": "public/vendor_styles.min.css",
            "src": [
                "public/lib/bootstrap/dist/css/bootstrap.min.css",
                "public/lib/bootstrap/dist/css/bootstrap-theme.min.css"
            ]
        },
        "vendorJs": {
            "dest": "public/lib.min.js",
            "src": [
                "public/lib/jquery/dist/jquery.min.js",
                "public/lib/bootstrap/dist/js/bootstrap.min.js",
                "public/lib/angular/angular.min.js",
                "public/lib/angular-resource/angular-resource.min.js",
                "public/lib/angular-cookies/angular-cookies.min.js",
                "public/lib/angular-ui-router/release/angular-ui-router.min.js",
                "public/lib/angular-bootstrap/ui-bootstrap-tpls.min.js"
            ]
        },
        "publicCss": {
            "dest": "public/client_styles.min.css",
            "src": [
                "public/client/index/styles/common.css"
            ]
        },
        "publicJs": {
            "dest": "public/client.min.js",
            "src": [
                "public/client/app.js",
                "public/client/**/*.js",
                "!public/client/init.js",
                "public/client/init.js",
                "!public/client/**/*Test.js"
            ]
        },
        "underscore": {
            "dest": "//cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/underscore.js/1.6.0/underscore-min.js",
            "src": "//cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/underscore.js/1.6.0/underscore.js"
        }
    }
}

####gruntfile.js - array format Note here that file array format requires the files attribute be a list of objects from the assets configuration:

    grunt.initConfig({
        pkg: grunt.file.readJSON('package.json'),
        assets: grunt.file.readJSON('client/assets-faf.json'),
        concat: {
            options: {
                separator: ';'
            },
            production: {
                files: [
                    '<%= assets.main.vendorCss %>',
                    '<%= assets.main.vendorJs %>'
                ]
            }
        },
        cssmin: {
            options: {},
            production: {
                files: ['<%= assets.main.clientCss %>']
            }
        },
        uglify: {
            options: {},
            production: {
                files: ['<%= assets.main.clientJs %>']
            }
        }
    });
 
    grunt.loadNpmTasks('grunt-contrib-concat');
    grunt.loadNpmTasks('grunt-contrib-cssmin');
    grunt.loadNpmTasks('grunt-contrib-uglify');
 
    grunt.registerTask('production', [
        'concat:production',
        'cssmin:production',
        'uglify:production'
    ]);
 

In your node app require assetmanager, the example below is partial code from an express setup. Call assetmanager.process with your files from your assets.json config file. Set the debug value to toggle between your compressed files and your development files. You can also set the webroot value so that when assetmanager processes your files it will change public/lib/angular/angular.js to /lib/angular/angular.js so that everything is relative to your webroot.

For the sake of efficiency, assetmanager should be configured after your static resources.

  • assets - An object containing the list of assets. Default: {}
  • debug - When true returns source assets rather than destination files. Default: true
  • webroot - Strip the webroot folder name from the file paths. Default: false
  • cachebust - Append a cache bust string to the end of the asset path. Default: 'local'
    • 'local' appends cache bust to local files only.
    • 'all' appends cache bust to local and remote/cdn files.
    • false disables cache bust.
'use strict';
 
/**
 * Module dependencies.
 */
var express = require('express'),
    assetmanager = require('assetmanager');
 
module.exports = function(app, passport, db) {
 
    app.use(express.static(config.root + '/client'));
 
    app.configure(function() {
        // Import your asset file
        var assets = assetmanager.process({
            assets: require('./assets.json'),
            debug: (process.env.NODE_ENV !== 'production'),
            webroot: 'public'
        });
        // Add assets to local variables
        app.use(function (req, res, next) {
            res.locals({
                assets: assets
            });
            next();
        });
 
        // ... Your CODE
 
    });
 
    // ... Your CODE
 
};

Then finally in your template you can output them with whatever templating framework you use. Using swig your main layout template might look something like this:

{% for file in assets.main.css %}
    <link rel="stylesheet" href="{{file}}">
{% endfor %}
 
{% for file in assets.main.js %}
    <script type="text/javascript" src="{{file}}"></script>
{% endfor %}

And in perhaps a secondary layout your second group of files:

{% for file in assets.secondary.css %}
    <link rel="stylesheet" href="{{file}}">
{% endfor %}
 
{% for file in assets.secondary.js %}
    <script type="text/javascript" src="{{file}}"></script>
{% endfor %}