Nacho Portmanteau Meltdown

    @next-auth/dgraph-adapter
    TypeScript icon, indicating that this package has built-in type declarations

    1.0.4 • Public • Published


        

    Dgraph Adapter - NextAuth.js

    Open Source. Full Stack. Own Your Data.

    Overview

    This is the Dgraph Adapter for next-auth. This package can only be used in conjunction with the primary next-auth package. It is not a standalone package.

    You can find two Graphql schemas in the docs.

    1. The unsecure don't implement any auth directive is perfect for a quick start.
    2. The second one is more secure and require you replace some value before copy pasting it into your Dgraph console (see Securing your database).

    Getting Started

    1. Install next-auth and @next-auth/dgraph-adapter
    npm install next-auth @next-auth/dgraph-adapter
    1. Add this adapter to your pages/api/[...nextauth].js next-auth configuration object.
    import NextAuth from "next-auth"
    import { DgraphAdapter } from "@next-auth/dgraph-adapter";
    
    // For more information on each option (and a full list of options) go to
    // https://next-auth.js.org/configuration/options
    export default NextAuth({
      // https://next-auth.js.org/configuration/providers
      providers: [
        ...,
      ],
      adapter: DgraphAdapter({
        endpoint: process.env.DGRAPH_GRAPHQL_ENDPOINT,
        authToken: process.env.DGRAPH_GRAPHQL_KEY,
    
        // you can omit the following properties if you are running an unsecure schema
        authHeader: "<YOUR AUTH HEADER>",
        jwtSecret: process.env.SECRET
      })
      ...
    })

    Quick start with the unsecure schema

    The simplest way to use Dgraph is by copy pasting the unsecure schema into your dashboard. Then create an api client key and grab your endpoint to initialize your DgraphClient. Forget about authHeader and jwtSecret.

    Securing your database

    Fore sake of security and mostly if your client directly communicate with the graphql server you obviously want to restrict the access to the types used by next-auth. That's why you see a lot of @auth directive alongide this types in the schema.

    Dgraph.Authorization

    The first thing to do in order to secure your graphql backend is to define the Dgraph.Authorization object at the bottom of your schema and provide authHeader and jwtSecret values to the DgraphClient.

    # Dgraph.Authorization {"VerificationKey":"<YOUR JWT SECRET HERE>","Header":"<YOUR AUTH HEADER HERE>","Namespace":"<YOUR CUSTOM NAMESPACE HERE>","Algo":"HS256"}

    VerificationKey and jwtSecret

    This is the key you use to sign the JWT. Probably your process.env.SECRET.

    Header and authHeader

    The Header tells Dgraph where to lookup for a jwt with auth credentials. You have to configure it a te bottom of your schema. This header is the same as the authHeader property you provide when you instantiate the DgraphClient.

    Working with JWT session and @auth directive

    Dgraph only works with HS256 or RS256 algorithms. If you want to use session jwt to securely interact with your dgraph database you have to customize next-auth encode and decode functions because the default algorithm is HS512. You can there going further and customize the jwt with roles if you want to implement RBAC logic.

    import * as jwt from "jsonwebtoken";
    
    export default NextAuth({
    
    ...
    
    session: {
        jwt: true
      },
        jwt: {
          secret: process.env.SECRET,
          encode: async ({ secret, token }) => {
            return jwt.sign({
              ...token,
              userId: token.id,
              // role: "ADMIN" for RBAC
              },
              secret,
              {
              algorithm: "HS256",
              expiresIn: 30 * 24 * 60 * 60; // 30 days
            });;
          },
          decode: async ({ secret, token }) => {
            return jwt.verify(token, secret, { algorithms: ["HS256"] });
          }
      },
    
    ...
    
    })

    Once your Dgraph.Authorization define in your schema and this JWT settings set, this will allow you to define @auth rules for every part of your schema.

    @auth implementation

    type User
      @auth(
        ...
    
         query: { or: [
            {
              rule: """
                  query ($userId: String!) {
                    queryUser(filter: { id: { eq: $userId } } ) {
                      id
                      }
                    }
                    """
            },
            { rule: "{$role { eq: "ADMIN" } }" }
            { rule: "{$nextAuth { eq: true } }" },
           ]},
    
          ...
      ) {
      id: ID
      ...
    }
    

    Contributing

    We're open to all community contributions! If you'd like to contribute in any way, please read our Contributing Guide.

    License

    ISC

    Install

    npm i @next-auth/dgraph-adapter

    DownloadsWeekly Downloads

    37

    Version

    1.0.4

    License

    ISC

    Unpacked Size

    23.8 kB

    Total Files

    11

    Last publish

    Collaborators

    • thvu
    • ndom91
    • balazsorban
    • iaincollins