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@hyperjump/json-schema-core

0.17.0 • Public • Published

Hyperjump - JSON Schema Core

JSON Schema Core (JSC) is a framework for building JSON Schema based validators and other tools.

It includes tools for:

  • Working with schemas ($id, $schema, $ref, etc)
  • Working with instances
  • Building custom keywords
  • Building vocabularies
  • Standard output formats
  • Compiling schemas for validating multiple instances

Install

JSC is designed to run in a vanilla node.js environment, but has no dependencies on node.js specific libraries so it can be bundled for the browser. No compilers, preprocessors, or bundlers are used.

Node.js

npm install @hyperjump/json-schema-core

Browser

When in a browser context, JSC is designed to use the browser's fetch implementation instead of a node.js fetch clone. The Webpack bundler does this properly without any extra configuration, but if you are using the Rollup bundler you will need to include the browser: true option in your Rollup configuration.

  plugins: [
    resolve({
      browser: true
    }),
    commonjs()
  ]

Schema

A Schema Document (SDoc) is a structure that includes the schema, the id, and a JSON Pointer. The "value" of an SDoc is the portion of the schema that the JSON pointer points to. This allows an SDoc to represent any value in the schema while maintaining enough context to follow $refs and track the position in the document.

  • Schema.add: (schema: object, url?: URI, schemaVersion?: string) => undefined

    Load a schema. See the "$id" and "$schema" sections for more details

  • Schema.get: (url: URI, contextDoc?: SDoc, recursive: boolean = false) => Promise

    Fetch a schema. Schemas can come from an HTTP request, a file, or a schema that was added with Schema.add.

  • Schema.uri: (doc: SDoc) => URI

    Returns a URI including the id and JSON Pointer that represents a value within the schema.

  • Schema.value: (doc: SDoc) => any

    The portion of the schema the document's JSON Pointer points to.

  • Schema.typeOf: (doc: SDoc, type: string) => boolean

    Determines if the JSON type of the given doc matches the given type

  • Schema.has: (key: string, doc: SDoc) => Promise

    Similar to key in schema.

  • Schema.step: (key: string, doc: SDoc) => Promise

    Similar to schema[key], but returns an SDoc.

  • Schema.entries: (doc: SDoc) => Promise<[[string, SDoc]]>

    Similar to Object.entries, but returns SDocs for values.

  • Schema.keys: (doc: SDoc) => [string]

    Similar to Object.keys.

  • Schema.map: (fn: (item: Promise, index: integer) => T, doc: SDoc) => Promise<[T]>

    A map function for an SDoc whose value is an array.

  • Schema.length: (doc: SDoc) => number

    Similar to Array.prototype.length.

$id

JSC requires that all schemas are identified by at least one URI. There are two types of schema identifiers, internal and external. An internal identifier is an identifier that is specified within the schema using $id. An external identifier is an identifier that is specified outside of the schema. In JSC, an external identifier can be either the URL a schema is retrieved with, or the identifier specified when using Schema.add to load a schema.

JSC can fetch schemas from the web or from the file system, but when fetching from the file system, there are limitations for security reasons. If your schema has an identifier with an http scheme (http://example.com), it's not allowed to reference schemas with a file scheme (file:///path/to/my/schemas).

Internal identifiers ($ids) are resolved against the external identifier of the schema (if one exists) and the resulting URI is used to identify the schema. All identifiers must be absolute URIs. External identifiers are required to be absolute URIs and internal identifiers must resolve to absolute URIs.

const { Core, Schema } = require("@hyperjump/json-schema-core");
 
 
// Example: Inline schema with external identifier
const schemaJson = {
  "$schema": "https://json-schema.org/draft/2019-09/schema",
  "type": "string"
}
Schema.add(schemaJson, "http://example.com/schemas/string");
const schema = await Schema.get("http://example.com/schemas/string");
 
// Example: Inline schema with internal identifier
const schemaJson = {
  "$schema": "https://json-schema.org/draft/2019-09/schema",
  "$id": "http://example.com/schemas/string",
  "type": "string"
}
Schema.add(schemaJson);
const schema = await Schema.get("http://example.com/schemas/string");
 
// Example: Inline schema with no identifier
const schemaJson = {
  "$schema": "https://json-schema.org/draft/2019-09/schema",
  "type": "string"
}
Schema.add(schemaJson); // Error: Couldn't determine an identifier for the schema
 
// Given the following schema at http://example.com/schemas/foo
// {
//  "$schema": "https://json-schema.org/draft/2019-09/schema",
//  "$id": "http://example.com/schemas/string",
//  "type": "string"
// }
 
// Example: Fetch schema from external HTTP identifier
const schema = await Schema.get("http://example.com/schemas/string");
 
// Example: Fetch schema from internal identifier
const schema = await Schema.get("http://example.com/schemas/foo");
 
// Given the following schema at http://example.com/schemas/bar
// {
//  "$schema": "https://json-schema.org/draft/2019-09/schema",
//  "$id": "string",
//  "type": "string"
// }
 
// Example: Fetch schema from internal identifier resolved against external identifier
const schema = await Schema.get("http://example.com/schemas/string");
 
// Given the following schema at /path/to/my/schemas/string.schema.json
// {
//  "$schema": "https://json-schema.org/draft/2019-09/schema",
//  "type": "string"
// }
 
// Example: Fetch schema from external FILE identifier
const schema = await Schema.get("file:///path/to/my/schemas/string.schema.json");
 
// Given the following schema at /path/to/my/schemas/string.schema.json
// {
//  "$schema": "https://json-schema.org/draft/2019-09/schema",
//  "type": "string"
// }
//
// Given the following schema at http://example.com/schemas/baz
// {
//  "$schema": "https://json-schema.org/draft/2019-09/schema",
//  "$ref": "file:///path/to/my/schemas/string.schema.json"
// }
 
// Example: Reference file from network context
const schema = await Schema.get("http://example.com/schemas/baz");
await Core.validate(schema); // Error: Can't access file resource from network context

$schema

JSC is designed to support multiple drafts of JSON Schema and it makes no assumption about what draft your schema uses. You need to specify it in some way. The preferred way is to the use $schema in all of your schemas, but you can also specify what draft to use when adding a schema using Schema.add. If a draft is specified in Schema.add and the schema has a $schema, the $schema will be used. If no draft is specified, you will get an error.

// Example: Internal schema version
const schemaJSON = {
  "$schema": "https://json-schema.org/draft/2019-09/schema",
  "$id": "http://example.com/schemas/string",
  "type": "string"
};
Schema.add(schemaJSON);
 
// Example: External schema version
const schemaJSON = {
  "type": "string"
};
Schema.add(schemaJSON, "http://example.com/schemas/string", "https://json-schema.org/draft/2019-09/schema");
 
// Example: No schema version
const schemaJSON = {
  "$id": "http://example.com/schemas/string",
  "type": "string"
};
Schema.add(schemaJSON); // Error: Couldn't determine schema version
 
// Given the following schema at http://example.com/schemas/foo
// {
//   "type": "string"
// }
 
// Example: No schema version external
const schema = Schema.get("http://example.com/schemas/string"); // Error: Couldn't determine schema version

Instance

An Instance Document (IDoc) is like a Schema Document (SDoc) except with much more limited functionality.

  • Instance.cons: (instance: any) => IDoc

    Construct a IDoc from a value.

  • Instance.get: (url: URI, contextDoc: IDoc) => IDoc

    Apply a same-resource reference to a IDoc.

  • Instance.uri: (doc: IDoc) => URI

    Returns a URI including the id and JSON Pointer that represents a value within the instance.

  • Instance.value: (doc: IDoc) => any

    The portion of the instance that the document's JSON Pointer points to.

  • Instance.typeOf: (doc: IDoc, type: string) => boolean

    Determines if the JSON type of the given doc matches the given type.

  • Instance.step: (key: string, doc: IDoc) => IDoc

    Similar to schema[key], but returns a IDoc.

  • Instance.entries: (doc: IDoc) => [string, IDoc]

    Similar to Object.entries, but returns IDocs for values.

  • Instance.keys: (doc: IDoc) => [string]

    Similar to Object.keys.

  • Instance.map: (fn: (item: IDoc, index: integer) => T, doc: IDoc) => [T]

    A map function for a IDoc whose value is an array.

  • Instance.reduce: (fn: (accumulator: T, item: IDoc, index: integer) => T, initial: T, doc: IDoc) => T

    A reduce function for a IDoc whose value is an array.

  • Instance.every: (fn: (doc: IDoc, index: integer) => boolean, doc: IDoc) => boolean

    An every function for a IDoc whose value is an array.

  • Instance.some: (fn: (doc: IDoc, index: integer) => boolean, doc: IDoc) => boolean

    A some function for a IDoc whose value is an array.

  • Instance.length: (doc: IDoc) => number

    Similar to Array.prototype.length.

Validation

Some helper functions are provided to assist in building validation functions.

  • Core.validate: (schema: SDoc, value: any, outputFormat: OutputFormat = Core.FLAG) => Promise

    A curried function that validates a JavaScript value against a schema.

  • Core.compile: (schema: SDoc) => Promise

    Compile a schema to be used interpreted later. A compiled schema is a JSON serializable structure that can be serialized an restored for later use.

  • Core.interpret: (schema: CompiledSchema, instance: Instance, outputFormat = Core.FLAG) =>

    A curried function for validating an instance against a compiled schema.

const { Core, Schema } = require("@hyperjump/json-schema-core");
 
 
// Example: Inline schema with external identifier
Schema.add({
  "$id": "http://example.com/schemas/string",
  "$schema": "https://json-schema.org/draft/2019-09/schema",
  "type": "string"
});
const schema = await Schema.get("http://example.com/schemas/string");
 
// Generate a validation function from a Schema Document
const isString = await Core.validate(schema);
 
// Validate a value from a Schema Document in one step
const result = await Core.validate(schema, "foo");
 
// Compile a Schema Document for use later
const compiledSchema = await Core.compile(schema);
 
// Generate a validation function from a compiled schema
const isString = Core.interpret(compiledSchema);
 
// Validate an instance from a compiled schema
const result = Core.interpret(compiledSchema, Instance.cons("foo"));

Output

JSC supports all of the standard output formats specified for JSON Schema draft-2019-09 and is separately configurable for instance validation and meta-validtion.

This implementation does not include the suggested keywordLocation property in the output unit. I think absoluteKeywordLocation+instanceLocation is sufficient for debugging and it's awkward for the output to produce JSON Pointers that potentially won't resolve because they cross schema boundaries.

This implementation includes an extra property in the output unit called keyword. This is an identifier (URI) for the keyword that was validated. With the standard output unit fields, we can see what keyword was validated by inspecting the last segment of the absoluteKeywordLocation property. But, since JSC can support multiple JSON Schema versions, we would have to pull up the actual schema to find what draft was used. The schema property gives us enough information to not have to go back to the schema to know what draft is being used.

By default JSC will validate all schemas against their meta-schema. However, the only time you really need this is when developing schemas. When JSC is running in a production environment or you are working with third-party schemas that you trust to be correct, you can turn off meta-validation to boost performance.

  • Core.setMetaOutputFormat: (outputFormat: OutputFormat) => undefined

    Set the output format used for schema validation. Default Core.DETAILED

  • Core.setShouldMetaValidate: (shouldMetaValidate: boolean) => undefined

    Turn schema validation on or off. Default true

  • OutputFormat: An enum of available output formats

    • Core.FLAG - Default for instance validation
    • Core.BASIC
    • Core.DETAILED - Default for meta-validation
    • Core.VERBOSE
const { Core, Schema } = require("@hyperjump/json-schema-core");
 
 
// Example: Specify instance validation output format
Schema.add({
  "$schema": "https://json-schema.org/draft/2019-09/schema",
  "$id": "http://example.com/schemas/string",
  "type": "string"
});
const schema = await Schema.get("http://example.com/schemas/string");
const isString = await Core.validate(schema);
const output = isString(42, Core.BASIC); // => {
//   "keyword": "https://json-schema.org/draft/2019-09/schema",
//   "absoluteKeywordLocation": "http://example.com/schemas/string#",
//   "instanceLocation": "#",
//   "valid": false,
//   "errors": [
//     {
//       "keyword": "https://json-schema.org/draft/2019-09/schema#type",
//       "absoluteKeywordLocation": "http://example.com/schemas/string#/type",
//       "instanceLocation": "#",
//       "valid": false
//     }
//   ]
// }
 
// Example: Specify meta-validation output format
Schema.add({
  "$schema": "https://json-schema.org/draft/2019-09/schema",
  "$id": "http://example.com/schemas/foo",
  "type": "this-is-not-a-valid-type"
});
Core.setMetaOutputFormat(Core.BASIC);
const schema = await Schema.get("http://example.com/schemas/foo");
const isString = await Core.validate(schema); // InvalidSchemaError: {
//   "keyword": "https://json-schema.org/draft/2019-09/schema",
//   "absoluteKeywordLocation": "https://json-schema.org/draft/2019-09/schema#",
//   "instanceLocation": "#",
//   "valid": false,
//   "errors": [
//     {
//       "keyword": "https://json-schema.org/draft/2019-09/schema#allOf",
//       "absoluteKeywordLocation": "https://json-schema.org/draft/2019-09/schema#/allOf",
//       "instanceLocation": "#",
//       "valid": false
//     }
//     ...
//   ]
// }
 
// Example: Turn off schema validation
Core.setShouldMetaValidate(false);
const schema = await Schema.get("http://example.com/schemas/foo"); // Load invalid schema
const isString = await Core.validate(schema); // Schema compilation succeeds even though schema is invalid

PubSub

JSC emits events that you can subscribe to and work with however your application needs. For now, the only event is the "result" event that emits output units every time a keyword is validated. Internally, JSC uses these events to build standard output formats. Other events can be added when use-cases are identified for them.

const PubSub = require("pubsub-js");
const { Core, Schema } = require("@hyperjump/json-schema-core");
 
 
Schema.add({
  "$schema": "https://json-schema.org/draft/2019-09/schema",
  "$id": "http://example.com/schemas/string",
  "type": "string"
});
const schema = await Schema.get("http://example.com/schemas/string");
const isString = await Core.validate(schema);
 
const results = [];
const subscriptionToken = PubSub.subscribe("result", (message, result) => {
  results.push(result);
});
isString(42);
PubSub.unsubscribe(subscriptionToken);
results; // => [
//   {
//     "keyword": "https://json-schema.org/draft/2019-09/schema",
//     "absoluteKeywordLocation": "http://example.com/schemas/string#",
//     "instanceLocation": "#",
//     "valid": false
//   },
//   {
//     "keyword": "https://json-schema.org/draft/2019-09/schema#type",
//     "absoluteKeywordLocation": "http://example.com/schemas/string#/type",
//     "instanceLocation": "#",
//     "valid": false
//   }
// ]

Customize

JSC uses a micro-kernel architecture, so it's highly customizable. Everything is a plugin, even the validation logic is a plugin. So, in theory, you can use JSC as a framework for building other types of JSON Schema based tools such as code generators or form generators.

In addition to this documentation you should be able to look at the JSV code to see an example of how to add your custom plugins because it's all implemented the same way.

  • Schema.setConfig: (schemaVersion: string, configName: string, configValue: string) => undefined

    Set a configuration value for a schemaVersion.

  • Schema.getConfig: (schemaVersion: string, configName: string) => any

    Get a configuration value for a schemaVersion.

References

The $ref keyword has changed a couple times over the last several drafts. JSC allows you to configure which version(s) of $refs you want to support. There are several types of references.

  • JSON Reference: (draft-04/06/07) In draft-04, references were defined in a separate spec from JSON Schema. The JSON Schema spec only constrained $ref in how URIs are resolved with respect to id. Then in draft-06/07, JSON Schema absorbed the JSON Reference spec and further constrained $ref to only be allowed where schemas are allowed. JSC doesn't support this constraint because it can't be done in a keyword agnostic way.

  • JSON Schema Reference: (draft-2019-09) In draft 2019-09, a reference was changed from being an object with a $ref property to the value of a $ref keyword. This allowed $ref to behave more like a keyword.

  • Dynamic JSON Schema Reference: (draft-2019-09) In draft 2019-09, the concept of a dynamic scope reference was added to make it easier to extend recursive schemas. This was added to support building custom meta-schemas.

References can be configured by $schema identifier. When you create a custom meta-schema, you will need to configure which types of references your schema version supports. You do this with Schema.setConfig.

const { Schema } = require("@hyperjump/json-schema-core");
 
 
// Configure draft-2019-09 style references
Schema.setConfig("https://json-schema.org/draft/2019-09/schema", "jsrefToken", "$ref");
Schema.setConfig("https://json-schema.org/draft/2019-09/schema", "dynamicJsrefToken", "$recursiveRef");
 
// Configure draft-04/6/7 style references
Schema.setConfig("http://json-schema.org/draft-04/schema", "jrefToken", "$ref");

Identifiers

The $id keyword has seen it's fair share of churn as well. Although the spec around this keyword was rewritten an clarified many times, the vast majority of changes have simply been name changes. JSC allows you to configure which version you want to support.

  • id: (draft-04) A base URI used to resolve reference URIs.

  • $id: (draft-06/07) Same as id, just a different name.

  • $id: (draft-2019-09) Same as $id except with same-document reference support split out into $anchor.

  • $anchor: (draft-2019-09) Same-document reference.

  • $recursiveAnchor: (draft-2019-09) Dynamic scope same-document reference. Value is a boolean that is only allowed at the root of a schema.

  • $dynamicAnchor: (draft-2019-09) Dynamic scope same-document reference. Value is a string and works like $anchor.

In draft-2019-09, $id was redefined from being a resolution scope modifier to being an inlined reference. This means that JSON Pointers can not cross into schemas with $ids. So far, JSC only supports these bounded $ids. If I come up with a way to relax this constraint for old draft implementations, I will, but since there is no sensible reason to want such a thing, it's a low priority.

In JSON Schema, properties called $id are only considered identifiers if they appear in a schema. JSC is keyword agnostic, so it doesn't know what is a schema and what isn't. Therefore, an $id might be treated as an identifier in places it's not expected to. This is unlikely, but not impossible.

const { Schema } = require("@hyperjump/json-schema-core");
 
 
// Configure draft-2019-09 style identifiers
Schema.setConfig("https://json-schema.org/draft/2019-09/schema", "baseToken", "$id");
Schema.setConfig("https://json-schema.org/draft/2019-09/schema", "embeddedToken", "$id");
Schema.setConfig("https://json-schema.org/draft/2019-09/schema", "anchorToken", "$anchor");
Schema.setConfig("https://json-schema.org/draft/2019-09/schema", "recursiveAnchorToken", "$recursiveAnchor");
 
// Configure draft-06/7 style references
Schema.setConfig("http://json-schema.org/draft-04/schema", "baseToken", "$id");
Schema.setConfig("http://json-schema.org/draft-04/schema", "embeddedToken", "$id");
Schema.setConfig("http://json-schema.org/draft-04/schema", "anchorToken", "$id");
 
// Configure draft-04 style references
Schema.setConfig("http://json-schema.org/draft-04/schema", "baseToken", "id");
Schema.setConfig("http://json-schema.org/draft-04/schema", "embeddedToken", "id");
Schema.setConfig("http://json-schema.org/draft-04/schema", "anchorToken", "id");

Custom Meta-Schemas

Let's say you want to use a custom meta-schema that does stricter validation than the standard meta-schema. Once you have your custom meta-schema ready, it's just a couple lines of code to start using it.

const { Core, Schema } = require("@hyperjump/json-schema-core");
 
 
// Optional: Load your meta-schema. If you don't do this, JSC will fetch it
// using it's identifier when it's needed.
Schema.add({
  "$id": "https://example.com/draft/2019-09-strict/schema",
  "$schema": "https://json-schema.org/draft/2019-09/schema",
  "$vocabulary": {
    "https://json-schema.org/draft/2019-09/vocab/core": true,
    "https://json-schema.org/draft/2019-09/vocab/applicator": true,
    "https://json-schema.org/draft/2019-09/vocab/validation": true,
    "https://json-schema.org/draft/2019-09/vocab/meta-data": true,
    "https://json-schema.org/draft/2019-09/vocab/format": false,
    "https://json-schema.org/draft/2019-09/vocab/content": true
  },
  ...
});
 
// Use the URI you chose for your meta-schema for the `$schema` in you schemas.
Schema.add({
  "$id": "http://example.com/schemas/string",
  "$schema": "http://example.com/draft/2019-09-strict/schema",
  "type": "string"
});
const schema = await Schema.get("http://example.com/schemas/string");
await Core.validate(schema, "foo");

Keywords

A keyword implementation is a module with at least the functions: compile and interpret. In the compile step, you can do any processing steps necessary to do the actual validation in the interpret step. The most common things to do in the compile step is to follow references and compile sub-schemas. The interpret step takes the result of the compile step and returns a boolean value indicating whether validation has passed or failed.

If your custom keyword is an applicator and your dialect supports unevaluatedProperties and unevaluatedItems, you'll also need to provide the collectEvaluatedProperties and collectEvaluatedItems functions.

You can Use the JSV keyword implementations as examples when creating your own keywords.

  • Core.getKeyword: (keywordId: string) => Keyword

    Retreive a keyword by it's identifier.

  • Core.hasKeyword: (keywordId: string) => boolean

    Query whether a keyword implementation exists.

  • Core.compileSchema: (schema: SDoc, ast: AST) => undefined

    Compile a schema.

  • Core.interpretSchmea: (schemaUri: string, instance: Instance, ast: AST) => boolean

    Finds the compiled schema in the ast for the schemaUri and validates the instance against the it. The result is a boolean indicating if the keyword passes validation.

  • Core.collectEvaluatedProperties: (schemaUri: string, instance: Instance, ast: AST) => string[]

    Walk a schema and collect any property names that are evaluated by the schemas it finds. A property is not considered evaluated if the schema containing it is not valid.

  • Core.collectEvaluatedItems: (schemaUri: string, instance: Instance, ast: AST) => number

    Walk a schema and collect maximum number of items that are evaluated by the schemas it finds. An item is not considered evaluated if the schema containing it is not valid.

This example implements an if/then/else-like keyword called cond. cond is an array of schemas where the first is the if schema, the second is the then schema, and the third is the else schema.

const { Core, Schema } = require("@hyperjump/json-schema-core");
 
 
const compile = async (schema, ast, parentSchema) => {
  const schemas = Schema.map((schema) => Core.compileSchema(schema, ast), cond);
  return Promise.all(schemas);
};
 
const interpret = (cond, instance, ast) => {
  return Core.interpretSchema(cond[0], instance, ast)
    ? (conditional[1] ? Core.interpretSchema(cond[1], instance, ast) : true)
    : (conditional[2] ? Core.interpretSchema(cond[2], instance, ast) : true);
};
 
const collectEvaluatedProperties = (cond, instance, ast) => {
  const propertyNames = Core.collectEvaluatedProperties(conditional[0], instance, ast);
  const branch = propertyNames ? 1 : 2;
 
  if (conditional[branch]) {
    const branchPropertyNames = Core.collectEvaluatedProperties(conditional[branch], instance, ast);
    return branchPropertyNames && (propertyNames || []).concat(branchPropertyNames);
  } else {
    return propertyNames || [];
  }
};
 
const collectEvaluatedItems = (cond, instance, ast) => {
  const tupleLength = Core.collectEvaluatedItems(cond[0], instance, ast);
  const branch = typeof tupleLength === "number" ? 1 : 2;
 
  if (conditional[branch]) {
    const branchTupleLength = Core.collectEvaluatedItems(conditional[branch], instance, ast);
    return branchTupleLength !== false && Math.max(tupleLength, branchTupleLength);
  } else {
    return tupleLength || 0;
  }
};
 
module.exports = { compile, interpret, collectEvaluatedProperties, collectEvaluatedItems };

In order to use an keyword in an implementation, you need to add it to a vocabulary.

Vocabularies

A vocabulary is just a named collection of keywords.

  • Core.defineVocabulary: (vocabularyId: string, keywords: { [keywordId]: Keyword }) => undefined

    Define a vocabulary giving it an identifier and an object that maps keyword identifiers to keyword implementations.

const { Core, Schema } = require("@hyperjump/json-schema-core");
const cond = require("./keywords/cond");
 
 
// Choose a URI for your vocabulary and add keywords
Core.defineVocabulary("https://example.com/draft/custom/vocab/conditionals", {
  cond: cond
});
 
// Create a new meta-schema an add your vocabulary to `$vocabulary`
Schema.add({
  "$id": "https://example.com/draft/custom/schema",
  "$schema": "https://json-schema.org/draft/2019-09/schema",
  "$vocabulary": {
    ...
    "https://example.com/draft/custom/vocab/conditionals": true
  },
  ...
});
 
// Try it out
Schema.add({
  "$id": "http://example.com/schemas/cond-example",
  "$schema": "https://example.com/draft/custom/schema",
  "type": "integer",
  "cond": [
    { "minimum": 10 },
    { "multipleOf": 3 },
    { "multipleOf": 2 }
  ]
});
const schema = await Schema.get("http://example.com/schemas/cond-example");
await Core.validate(schema, 42);

Contributing

Tests

Run the tests

npm test

Run the tests with a continuous test runner

npm test -- --watch

Install

npm i @hyperjump/json-schema-core

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