Neutral, Plus or Minus

    zjslib

    0.1.4 • Public • Published

    zjslib...

    ...is a small (nearly spartan!) library of utilities providing an abstraction to the DOM layer (see Sprite), allowing you to separate the logic of your application from the HTML document. Additionally, the library provides an interface to easily clean up attached listeners / memory (see Disposable) as well as function prototypes that should work for both functional or object oriented programming patterns.

    Projects using this library :

    WebSID, RDBOHL...

    amongst others.

    requirements

    zjslib is written for node.js projects and uses CommonJS to resolve its dependencies. You can use a tool like Browserify to build the code for use in a webbrowser.

    installation

    You can get zjslib via NPM:

    npm install zjslib
    

    DOM

    Provides utilities for working with DOM contents, e.g. calculate positions, dimensions, etc.

    Disposable

    Provide an interface prototype that functions as the outline for any kind of Object that should have its own cleanup routine. A use case would be an Object that attaches a lot of listeners that need to be removed when the Object is to be dismissed, avoiding memory leaks.

    The prototype provides a "public method" :

    dispose();
    

    Which will invoke this "internal" method :

    disposeInternal();
    

    which should be overridden in your derived prototypes to include custom cleanup logic. The "dispose()"-method should not be overridden as it ensures that no subsequent calls to the same cleanup routine are made.

    Event

    A wrapper for an Event dispatched by a Sprite (see below). This wrapper provides a reference to the Sprite, as well as the DOM Element that first dispatched the Event (if the Event was a DOM event, such as mouse / touch events, etc.)

    EventDispatcher

    An Object that can register itself to listen to Events, as well as broadcast them. EventDispatcher is also Disposable and as such can instantly clean up its listeners when invoking the dispose()-method.

    Its methods are :

    addEventListener( aType, aCallback );
    

    listen to events of given type (String) aType and execute given (Function) aCallback when the Event is dispatched. Note that only ONE unique callback can be registered for each unique event type. If you wish to execute multiple callbacks for a single event wrap these in a single function, or consider changing your design pattern!

    removeEventListener( aType );
    

    removes the previously registered listener for an event with given type (String) aType.

    hasEventListener( aType );
    

    returns boolean true/false if a listener for given type (String) aType has been registered.

    dispatchEvent( aEvent );
    

    broadcast given (Event) aEvent to all listeners.

    EventHandler

    A wrapper Object that can listen to Events broadcast by different EventDispatchers / DOM Elements. EventHandler is also Disposable and can as such instantly clean up all registered listeners of all elements when invoking the dispose()-method. No need to detach individual callbacks from individual event types.

    Its methods are :

    addEventListener( aElement, aType, aCallback );
    

    listen to events of given type (String) aType, broadcast by given (Element|EventDispatcher) aElement and execute given (Function) aCallback when the Event is dispatched. Note that only ONE unique callback can be registered for each unique event type. If you wish to execute multiple callbacks for a single event wrap these in a single function, or consider changing your design pattern!

    removeEventListener( aElement, aType );
    

    removes the previously registered listener for an event with given type (String) aType from given (Element|EventDispatcher) aElement.

    hasEventListener( aElement, aType );
    

    returns boolean true/false if a listener for given type (String) aType has been registered onto given (Element|EventDispatcher) aElement.

    Inheritance

    A very simple namespace introducing OOP-style patterns in your applications, inspired by the Closure Library Authors work on the Google Closure library. It basically allows you to create a new "class" that "extends" another class (basically prototype inheritance).

    Its methods are :

    Inheritance.extend( subClass, superClass );
    

    indicating that given (Function) subClass should inherit the prototype of given (Function) superClass.

    Inheritance.super( classInstance, optMethodName, var_args... );
    

    executes a super call from given (Function) classInstance onto its parent prototype. (String) optMethodName describes the name of the function to invoke (must be undefined when calling super from a constructor). The remainder of the arguments are applied onto the prototype function.

    An example of creating a new derived Sprite "class" using Inheritance :

    var Sprite      = require( "zjslib" ).Sprite;
    var Inheritance = require( "zjslib" ).Inheritance;
    
    function SpriteExtension()
    {
        Inheritance.super( this, "div" );
    }
    
    Inheritance.extend( SpriteExtension, Sprite );
    

    Sprite

    Is a wrapper for a DOM element. A Sprite inherits from EventDispatcher (making it also Disposable). As the name suggests, it is inspired by the flash.display.Sprite known to ActionScript 3 developers, introducing the concept of a Display List, which is perfectly analogous to working with tags in HTML. When using the methods "addChild(At)", "removeChild(At)" it is possible to "stack" Sprites inside other Sprites. Consider :

    var stage  = new Sprite( document.body );
    var square = new Sprite( "div", { "id" : "square" });
    var circle = new Sprite( "div', { "id" : "circle" });
    
    stage.addChild ( square );
    square.addChild( circle );
    

    which basically says "circle is held inside square, which in turn is held inside stage", leading to the following HTML inside the DOM:

    <body>
        <div id="square">
            <div id="circle"></div>
        </div>
    </body>
    

    ...which for practical reasons is utterly useless for constructing a document (consider a templating engine)! The practical use case for constructing a Sprite is when an Element needs interaction handlers / broadcast Events to other actors in your application or influences related Elements.

    If you can think of your applications logic in pseudo code and find yourself not thinking in "that div when onclick-ed will toggle the CSS visiblity of all li's inside the parentNodes ul-container" but more along the lines of "object x can perform action y to alter my applications state in such-and-such manner" you might have yourself a more valid use case ;) As such, you will NOT need to look for elements in the DOM using "getElementById()", "querySelectorAll()_" or anything jQuery/sizzle like for that matter. You're merely requesting a property from an Object that just happens to be an Element inside the HTML document, thus bringing logic back into your applications code and not consciously dealing with how behaviour should translate to the DOM.

    (Note you can perfectly combine a templating engine to construct the DOM, and instantiate Sprites from specific tags inside the template should you choose to).

    On behaviour : you can attach Events to Sprites. If the Events are DOM Events (e.g. mouse / touch events), these are attached to the Sprites element (once more : that's the Element representing the Sprite inside the DOM), but broadcast over the Sprite instance (you can also use event bubbling to catch Events broadcast from Sprites higher up the display list). This means that the interface for working with custom Events and DOM Events is equal when working with a Sprite.

    So in the following snippet :

    var s = new Sprite( "button" ); // create a new <button> element
    
    stage.addChild( s ); // adds the <button> element referenced in Sprite s to the DOM
    
    // add a listener for DOM Event "click" to the <button> element referenced in Sprite s
    
    s.addEventListener( "click", function( e ) {
        s.dispatchEvent( new Event( "OMG" ));
    });
    
    // add a listener for custom Event "OMG" to Sprite s
    
    s.addEventListener( "OMG", function( e ) {
        alert( "strange Event mechanism is working!" );
    });
    

    ...we observe that the click handler (click being a DOM event that is to be attached to the Sprites -element) is attached to the Sprite, just like the handler for the custom Event "OMG". The Sprites addEventListener() / removeEventListener() methods will take care of this distinction for you.

    Additionally, the Sprite provides methods to manipulate the DOM element (e.g. toggle CSS classes, attributes, visibility, etc.) basically creating an abstraction layer between your code and the HTML document.

    Note that if you do need to access a Sprites DOM Element directly in your code, you can retrieve its reference using the getElement()-method.

    function Sprite( aElement, aProperties, aContent );
    

    Is the constructor. given aElement can be a reference to an existing (HTML Element|DOM Node) (e.g. "window", "document.body", or any other existing node inside the document) or a (String) tagName. When a tagName is given, the Element will be created on the fly (and become visible in the document once the newly constructed Sprite is added to a parent Sprite).

    (Object) aProperties is an optional Object describing the attributes of the Sprites Element. These are HTML attributes and can thus be anything like : "id", "class", data attributes, etc.

    (String) aContent is optional. When given its text contents will be applied onto the Elements innerHTML.

    The remainder of API will be documented here, until then you can look at the (heavily) annotated source file.

    utils/*

    Convenience utilities to do String manipulations, Array operations, etc. Look into the files to see what functions they hold. Note these utilities are not the be-all and end-all in String/Array operations, but rather some common re-used logic in the library.

    loaders/*

    Stripped-down loaders functions to integrate external content into your application. Likely to be updated with more features in the near future.

    Keywords

    none

    Install

    npm i zjslib

    DownloadsWeekly Downloads

    1

    Version

    0.1.4

    License

    MIT

    Last publish

    Collaborators

    • igorzinken