web-serial-api
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1.1.4 • Public • Published

Web Serial API Plugin with MRZ (Machine-Readable Zone) parser

"Buy Me A Coffee"

Table of Contents (for general use of this plugin)

Table of Contents (for future support and development)

Host app installation

Installing the package from NPM registry:

npm i web-serial-api

or

npm install <dir or repo to 'web-serial-api-(version).tgz'>

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Host app usage

Import, connect and read the data from COM port

connect() triggers the menu where the user will pick a device (it requires a user interaction to be triggered). It opens the port selected by the user in the UI using defined options like baudRate, stopBits etc. or options, provided by the host app. After opening the port, a reader is set.

Usage example (connect(), readAny(), readMrz(), stopReading() and disconnect()):

import {Reader} from 'web-serial-api'

/* without options / predetermined device */
const reader = new Reader();

async function connect() {
    await reader.connect()
        .then(res => {
            console.log(res)
        })
        .catch(err => {
            console.log(err);
        });
}

// Read from any serial device
async function read() {
    await reader.readAny()
        .then(res => {
            console.log(`Res from read ${res}`)
        })
        .catch(err => {
            console.log(err);
        });
}

// Read MRZ (Machine-readable zone) and get parsed data
async function read() {
    await reader.readMrz()
        .then(res => {
            console.log(`Res from MRZ reader ${res}`)
        })
        .catch(err => {
            console.log(err);
        });
}

async function stopReading() {
    await reader.stopReading()
        .then(res => {
            console.log(res);
        })
        .catch(err => {
            console.log(err)
        });
}

async function disconnect() {
    await reader.disconnect()
        .then(res => {
            console.log(res);
        })
        .catch(err => {
            console.log(err)
        });
}

With options:

const reader = new Reader({
    baudRate: 11000,
    bufferSize: 255,
    dataBits: 8,
    flowControl: "none",
    parity: "none",
    stopBits: 1
});

async function connect() {
    await reader.connect()
        .then(res => {
            /*Do something after connection ex. auto trigger read()*/
        })
        .catch(err => {
            /*Handle errors*/
        });
}

/* read(), stopReading() etc. as described above */

at Vue template:

<div class="row">
<div class="column">
  <div>Actions:</div>
  <button @click="connect()">Connect</button>
  <button @click="readMrz()">Read</button>
  <button @click="stopReading()">Stop reading</button>
  <button @click="disconnect()">Disconnect</button>
</div>
</div>
<div class="row">
<div class="column mt-2">
  <p>Name: {{ documentData?.fields.firstName }}</p>
  <p>Last name: {{ documentData?.fields.lastName }}</p>
  <p>Document number: {{ documentData?.fields.documentNumber }}</p>
  <p>ID number: {{ documentData?.fields.optional2 }}</p>
</div>
</div>

All provided options are optional, except for baudRate.

Connect to predetermined device

This plugin supports auto connection without the user's interaction. If we set autoConnectToPredeterminedDevice with number, representing device position at the device list().

We can pass Serial Number (currently not all devices expose their SN)

Example (no options, auto connect to device #4 ):

const reader = new Reader(undefined, 4);

async function connect() {
    await reader.connect()
        .then(res => {
            console.log('Res: ', res);
        })
        .catch(err => {
            console.log('Error connecting', err);
        });
}

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Reading and parsing MRZ documents (type TD1, TD2, TD3, MRVA, MRVB)

Reading MRZ

reader.readMrz() returns Promise<DocumentModel>

async function readMrz() {
    await reader.readMrz()
        .then(res => {
            console.log(`Response from MRZ reader ${res}`)
        })
        .catch(err => {
            console.log(err);
        });
}

About MRZ data props

  • format - String identifying the format of the parsed MRZ. Supported formats are:

    • TD1 (identity card with three MRZ lines)
    • TD2 (identity card with two MRZ lines)
    • TD3 (passport)
    • SWISS_DRIVING_LICENSE
    • FRENCH_NATIONAL_ID
  • valid - true if all fields are valid. false otherwise.

  • fields - Object mapping field names to their respective value. The value is set to null if it is invalid. The value may be different from the raw value. For example fields.sex will be "male" when the raw value was "M".

  • details - Array of objects describing all parsed fields.

    • label {string} - Full english term for the field.
    • field {string} - Name of the field in fields.
    • value {string} - Value of the field or null.
    • valid {boolean}
    • ranges {Array} - Array of ranges that are necessary to compute this field. Ranges are objects with line, start, end and raw.
    • line {number} - Index of the line where the field is located.
    • start {number} - Index of the start of the field in line.
    • end {number} - Index of the end of the field in line.
    • autocorrect - Array of objects containing all corrections (ex. blurry letters / numbers due to bad reading; similar to each other letters / numbers like G and 6, Z and 2, B and 8). Autocorrect has the following structure:
      • line{number} - reading issue line number
      • column{number} - reading issue column number
      • original{string} - original document letter / number
      • corrected{string} - replacement of original letter / number (ex. replacement of G with 6 or 6 with G );

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Concepts and Usage

The Web Serial API is one of a set of APIs that allow websites to communicate with peripherals connected to a user's computer. It provides the ability to connect to devices that are required by the operating system to communicate via the serial API, rather than USB which can be accessed via the WebUSB API, or input devices that can be accessed via WebHID API.

Interfaces

Interface Description
Serial Provides attributes and methods for finding and connecting to serial ports from a web page.
SerialPort Provides access to a serial port on the host device.

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In depth

Feature detection

To check if the Web Serial API is supported, use:

if ("serial" in navigator) {
    // The Web Serial API is supported.
}

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Open a serial port

The Web Serial API is asynchronous by design. This prevents the website UI from blocking when awaiting input, which is important because serial data can be received at any time, requiring a way to listen to it. To open a serial port, first access a SerialPort object. For this, you can either prompt the user to select a single serial port by calling navigator.serial.requestPort() in response to a user gesture such as touch or mouse click, or pick one from navigator.serial.getPorts() which returns a list of serial ports the website has been granted access to.

document.querySelector('button').addEventListener('click', async () => {
    // Prompt user to select any serial port.
    const port = await navigator.serial.requestPort();
});
// Get all serial ports the user has previously granted the website access to.
const ports = await navigator.serial.getPorts();

The navigator.serial.requestPort() function takes an optional object literal that defines filters. Those are used to match any serial device connected over USB with a mandatory USB vendor (usbVendorId) and optional USB product identifiers (usbProductId).

// Filter on devices with the Arduino Uno USB Vendor/Product IDs.
const filters = [
    {usbVendorId: 0x2341, usbProductId: 0x0043},
    {usbVendorId: 0x2341, usbProductId: 0x0001}
];

// Prompt user to select an Arduino Uno device.
const port = await navigator.serial.requestPort({filters});

const {usbProductId, usbVendorId} = port.getInfo();

Calling requestPort() prompts the user to select a device and returns a SerialPort object. Once you have a SerialPort object, calling port.open() with the desired baud rate will open the serial port. The baudRate dictionary member specifies how fast data is sent over a serial line. It is expressed in units of bits-per-second (bps). Check your device's documentation for the correct value as all the data you send and receive will be gibberish if this is specified incorrectly. For some USB and Bluetooth devices that emulate a serial port this value may be safely set to any value as it is ignored by the emulation.

// Prompt user to select any serial port.
const port = await navigator.serial.requestPort();

// Wait for the serial port to open.
await port.open({baudRate: 9600});

You can also specify any of the options below when opening a serial port. These options are optional.

  • dataBits: The number of data bits per frame (either 7 or 8).
  • stopBits: The number of stop bits at the end of a frame (either 1 or 2).
  • parity: The parity mode (either none, even or odd).
  • bufferSize: The size of the read and write buffers that should be created (must be less than 16MB).
  • flowControl: The flow control mode (either none or hardware).

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Read from a serial port

Input and output streams in the Web Serial API are handled by the Streams API.

After the serial port connection is established, the readable and writable properties from the SerialPort object return a ReadableStream and a WritableStream. Those will be used to receive data from and send data to the serial device. Both use Uint8Array instances for data transfer.

When new data arrives from the serial device, port.readable.getReader().read() returns two properties asynchronously: the value and a done boolean. If done is true, the serial port has been closed or there is no more data coming in. Calling port.readable.getReader() creates a reader and locks readable to it. While readable is locked, the serial port can't be closed.

const reader = port.readable.getReader();

// Listen to data coming from the serial device.
while (true) {
    const {value, done} = await reader.read();
    if (done) {
        // Allow the serial port to be closed later.
        reader.releaseLock();
        break;
    }
    // value is a Uint8Array.
    console.log(value);
}

Some non-fatal serial port read errors can happen under some conditions such as buffer overflow, framing errors, or parity errors. Those are thrown as exceptions and can be caught by adding another loop on top of the previous one that checks port.readable. This works because as long as the errors are non-fatal, a new ReadableStream is created automatically. If a fatal error occurs, such as the serial device being removed, then port.readable becomes null.

while (port.readable) {
    const reader = port.readable.getReader();

    try {
        while (true) {
            const {value, done} = await reader.read();
            if (done) {
                // Allow the serial port to be closed later.
                reader.releaseLock();
                break;
            }
            if (value) {
                console.log(value);
            }
        }
    } catch (error) {
        // TODO: Handle non-fatal read error.
    }
}

If the serial device sends text back, you can pipe port.readable through a TextDecoderStream as shown below. A TextDecoderStream is a transform stream that grabs all Uint8Array chunks and converts them to strings.

const textDecoder = new TextDecoderStream();
const readableStreamClosed = port.readable.pipeTo(textDecoder.writable);
const reader = textDecoder.readable.getReader();

// Listen to data coming from the serial device.
while (true) {
    const {value, done} = await reader.read();
    if (done) {
        // Allow the serial port to be closed later.
        reader.releaseLock();
        break;
    }
    // value is a string.
    console.log(value);
}

You can take control of how memory is allocated when you read from the stream using a "Bring Your Own Buffer" reader. Call port.readable.getReader({ mode: "byob" }) to get the ReadableStreamBYOBReader interface and provide your own ArrayBuffer when calling read(). Note that the Web Serial API supports this feature in Chrome 106 or later.

try {
    const reader = port.readable.getReader({mode: "byob"});
    // Call reader.read() to read data into a buffer...
} catch (error) {
    if (error instanceof TypeError) {
        // BYOB readers are not supported.
        // Fallback to port.readable.getReader()...
    }
}

Here's an example of how to reuse the buffer out of value.buffer:

const bufferSize = 1024; // 1kB
let buffer = new ArrayBuffer(bufferSize);

// Set `bufferSize` on open() to at least the size of the buffer.
await port.open({baudRate: 9600, bufferSize});

const reader = port.readable.getReader({mode: "byob"});
while (true) {
    const {value, done} = await reader.read(new Uint8Array(buffer));
    if (done) {
        break;
    }
    buffer = value.buffer;
    // Handle `value`.
}

Here's another example of how to read a specific amount of data from a serial port:

async function readInto(reader, buffer) {
    let offset = 0;
    while (offset < buffer.byteLength) {
        const {value, done} = await reader.read(
            new Uint8Array(buffer, offset)
        );
        if (done) {
            break;
        }
        buffer = value.buffer;
        offset += value.byteLength;
    }
    return buffer;
}

const reader = port.readable.getReader({mode: "byob"});
let buffer = new ArrayBuffer(512);
// Read the first 512 bytes.
buffer = await readInto(reader, buffer);
// Then read the next 512 bytes.
buffer = await readInto(reader, buffer);

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Write to a serial port

To send data to a serial device, pass data to port.writable.getWriter().write(). Calling releaseLock() on port.writable.getWriter() is required for the serial port to be closed later.

const writer = port.writable.getWriter();

const data = new Uint8Array([104, 101, 108, 108, 111]); // hello
await writer.write(data);


// Allow the serial port to be closed later.
writer.releaseLock();

Send text to the device through a TextEncoderStream piped to port.writable as shown below.

const textEncoder = new TextEncoderStream();
const writableStreamClosed = textEncoder.readable.pipeTo(port.writable);

const writer = textEncoder.writable.getWriter();

await writer.write("hello");

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Close a serial port

port.close() closes the serial port if its readable and writable members are unlocked, meaning releaseLock() has been called for their respective reader and writer.

await port.close();

However, when continuously reading data from a serial device using a loop, port.readable will always be locked until it encounters an error. In this case, calling reader.cancel() will force reader.read() to resolve immediately with { value: undefined, done: true } and therefore allowing the loop to call reader.releaseLock().

// Without transform streams.

let keepReading = true;
let reader;

async function readUntilClosed() {
    while (port.readable && keepReading) {
        reader = port.readable.getReader();
        try {
            while (true) {
                const {value, done} = await reader.read();
                if (done) {
                    // reader.cancel() has been called.
                    break;
                }
                // value is a Uint8Array.
                console.log(value);
            }
        } catch (error) {
            // Handle error...
        } finally {
            // Allow the serial port to be closed later.
            reader.releaseLock();
        }
    }

    await port.close();
}

const closedPromise = readUntilClosed();

document.querySelector('button').addEventListener('click', async () => {
    // User clicked a button to close the serial port.
    keepReading = false;
    // Force reader.read() to resolve immediately and subsequently
    // call reader.releaseLock() in the loop example above.
    reader.cancel();
    await closedPromise;
});

Closing a serial port is more complicated when using transform streams (like TextDecoderStream and TextEncoderStream). Call reader.cancel() as before. Then call writer.close() and port.close(). This propagates errors through the transform streams to the underlying serial port. Because error propagation doesn't happen immediately, you need to use the readableStreamClosed and writableStreamClosed promises created earlier to detect when port.readable and port.writable have been unlocked. Cancelling the reader causes the stream to be aborted; this is why you must catch and ignore the resulting error.

// With transform streams.

const textDecoder = new TextDecoderStream();
const readableStreamClosed = port.readable.pipeTo(textDecoder.writable);
const reader = textDecoder.readable.getReader();

// Listen to data coming from the serial device.
while (true) {
    const {value, done} = await reader.read();
    if (done) {
        reader.releaseLock();
        break;
    }
    // value is a string.
    console.log(value);
}

const textEncoder = new TextEncoderStream();
const writableStreamClosed = textEncoder.readable.pipeTo(port.writable);

reader.cancel();
await readableStreamClosed.catch(() => { /* Ignore the error */
});

writer.close();
await writableStreamClosed;

await port.close();

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Listen to connection and disconnection

If a serial port is provided by a USB device then that device may be connected or disconnected from the system. When the website has been granted permission to access a serial port, it should monitor the connect and disconnect events.

navigator.serial.addEventListener("connect", (event) => {
    // TODO: Automatically open event.target or warn user a port is available.
});

navigator.serial.addEventListener("disconnect", (event) => {
    // TODO: Remove |event.target| from the UI.
    // If the serial port was opened, a stream error would be observed as well.
});

Prior to Chrome 89 the connect and disconnect events fired a custom SerialConnectionEvent object with the affected SerialPort interface available as the port attribute. You may want to use event.port || event.target to handle the transition.

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Handle signals

After establishing the serial port connection, you can explicitly query and set signals exposed by the serial port for device detection and flow control. These signals are defined as boolean values. For example, some devices such as Arduino will enter a programming mode if the Data Terminal Ready (DTR) signal is toggled.

Setting output signals and getting input signals are respectively done by calling port.setSignals() and port.getSignals(). See usage examples below.

// Turn off Serial Break signal.
await port.setSignals({break: false});

// Turn on Data Terminal Ready (DTR) signal.
await port.setSignals({dataTerminalReady: true});

// Turn off Request To Send (RTS) signal.
await port.setSignals({requestToSend: false});
const signals = await port.getSignals();
console.log(`Clear To Send:       ${signals.clearToSend}`);
console.log(`Data Carrier Detect: ${signals.dataCarrierDetect}`);
console.log(`Data Set Ready:      ${signals.dataSetReady}`);
console.log(`Ring Indicator:      ${signals.ringIndicator}`);

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Transforming streams

When you receive data from the serial device, you won't necessarily get all of the data at once. It may be arbitrarily chunked. For more information, see Streams API concepts.

To deal with this, you can use some built-in transform streams such as TextDecoderStream or create your own transform stream which allows you to parse the incoming stream and return parsed data. The transform stream sits between the serial device and the read loop that is consuming the stream. It can apply an arbitrary transform before the data is consumed. Think of it like an assembly line: as a widget comes down the line, each step in the line modifies the widget, so that by the time it gets to its final destination, it's a fully functioning widget.

For example, consider how to create a transform stream class that consumes a stream and chunks it based on line breaks. Its transform() method is called every time new data is received by the stream. It can either enqueue the data or save it for later. The flush() method is called when the stream is closed, and it handles any data that hasn't been processed yet.

To use the transform stream class, you need to pipe an incoming stream through it. In the third code example under Read from a serial port, the original input stream was only piped through a TextDecoderStream, so we need to call pipeThrough() to pipe it through our new LineBreakTransformer.

class LineBreakTransformer {
    constructor() {
        // A container for holding stream data until a new line.
        this.chunks = "";
    }

    transform(chunk, controller) {
        // Append new chunks to existing chunks.
        this.chunks += chunk;
        // For each line breaks in chunks, send the parsed lines out.
        const lines = this.chunks.split("\r\n");
        this.chunks = lines.pop();
        lines.forEach((line) => controller.enqueue(line));
    }

    flush(controller) {
        // When the stream is closed, flush any remaining chunks out.
        controller.enqueue(this.chunks);
    }
}
const textDecoder = new TextDecoderStream();
const readableStreamClosed = port.readable.pipeTo(textDecoder.writable);
const reader = textDecoder.readable
    .pipeThrough(new TransformStream(new LineBreakTransformer()))
    .getReader();

For debugging serial device communication issues, use the tee() method of port.readable to split the streams going to or from the serial device. The two streams created can be consumed independently and this allows you to print one to the console for inspection.

const [appReadable, devReadable] = port.readable.tee();

// You may want to update UI with incoming data from appReadable
// and log incoming data in JS console for inspection from devReadable.

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Revoke access to a serial port

The website(or app) can clean up permissions to access a serial port it is no longer interested in retaining by calling forget() on the SerialPort instance. For example, for an educational web application used on a shared computer with many devices, a large number of accumulated user-generated permissions creates a poor user experience.

// Voluntarily revoke access to this serial port.
await port.forget();

As forget() is available in Chrome 103 or later, check if this feature is supported with the following:

if ("serial" in navigator && "forget" in SerialPort.prototype) {
    // forget() is supported.
}

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In depth (Machine-Readable Zone)

There are 3 main formats: TD1, TD2, TD3 and Visas (MRVA and MRVB).

Here are some samples we’ll use in the next sections: Screenshot

TD1 - Parsing and specification

Specification

This format is defined in Machine Readable Travel Documents Part 5: Specifications for TD1 Size Machine Readable Official Travel Documents (MROTDs) document.

Here is a sample image: Screenshot

Here is the format: Screenshot

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Parsing TD1 format

TD1 format has 3 lines, each has 30 characters.

Line 1 (TD1#1)

Regular expression (TD1#1)

Regular expression ([A|C|I][A-Z0-9<]{1})([A-Z]{3})([A-Z0-9<]{9})([0-9]{1})([A-Z0-9<]{15})
Group #1 Document type. `A`, `C` or `I` as the first character.
Group #2 3 letters country code.
Group #3 Document number, up to 9 alphanumeric characters.
Group #4 Check digit on the document number.
Group #5 Optional data at the discretion of the issuing state.

Sample result (TD1#1)

Screenshot

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Line 2 (TD1#2)

Regular expression (TD1#2)

Regular expression ([0-9]{6})([0-9]{1})([M|F|X|<]{1})([0-9]{6})([0-9]{1})([A-Z]{3})([A-Z0-9<]{11})([0-9]{1})
Group #1 Holder’s date of birth in format `YYMMDD`.
Group #2 Check digit on the date of birth.
Group #3 Sex of holder.
Group #4 Date of expiry of the document in format `YYMMDD`.
Group #5 Check digit on date of expiry.
Group #6 Nationality of the holder represented by a three-letter code.
Group #7 Optional data at the discretion of the issuing state.
Group #8 Overall check digit for upper and middle MRZ lines.

Sample result (TD1#2)

Screenshot

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Line 3 (TD1#3)

Regular expression (TD1#3)

Regular expression ([A-Z0-9<]{30})
Group #1 Names

Sample result (TD1#3)

Screenshot

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TD2 - Parsing and specification

Specification

This format is defined in Machine Readable Travel Documents Part 6: Specifications for TD2 Size Machine Readable Official Travel Documents (MROTDs) document.

Here is a sample image: Screenshot

Here is the format: Screenshot

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Parsing TD2 format

TD2 format has 2 lines, each has 36 characters.

Line 1 (TD2#1)

Regular expression (TD2#1)

Regular expression ([A|C|I][A-Z0-9<]{1})([A-Z]{3})([A-Z0-9<]{31})
Group #1 Document type. `A`, `C` or `I` as the first character.
Group #2 3 letters country code.
Group #3 Primary Identifier.

Sample result (TD2#1)

Screenshot

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Line 2 (TD2#2)

Regular expression (TD2#2)

Regular expression ([A-Z0-9<]{9})([0-9]{1})([A-Z]{3})([0-9]{6})([0-9]{1})([M|F|X|<]{1})([0-9]{6})([0-9]{1})([A-Z0-9<]{7})([0-9]{1})
Group #1 Document number, up to 9 alphanumeric characters.
Group #2 Check digit on document number.
Group #3 Nationality. 3 letters country code.
Group #4 Holder’s date of birth.
Group #5 Check digit on the date of birth.
Group #6 Sex of holder.
Group #7 Date of expiry of the document.
Group #8 Check digit on the date of expiry.
Group #9 Optional data at the discretion of the issuing state.
Group #10 Overall check digit

Sample result (TD2#2)

Screenshot

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TD3 - Parsing and specification

Specification

This format is defined in Machine Readable Travel Documents Part 4: Specifications for Machine Readable Passports (MRPs) and other TD3 Size MRTDs document.

Here is a sample image: Screenshot

Here is the format: Screenshot

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Parsing TD3 format

TD3 format has 2 lines, each has 44 characters.

Line 1 (TD3#1)

Regular expression (TD3#1)

Regular expression (P[A-Z0-9<]{1})([A-Z]{3})([A-Z0-9<]{39})
Group #1 Document type. `P` as the first character.
Group #2 3 letters country code.
Group #3 Primary Identifier.

Sample result (TD3#1)

Screenshot

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Line 2 (TD3#2)

Regular expression (TD3#2)

Regular expression ([A-Z0-9<]{9})([0-9]{1})([A-Z]{3})([0-9]{6})([0-9]{1})([M|F|X|<]{1})([0-9]{6})([0-9]{1})([A-Z0-9<]{14})([0-9]{1})([0-9]{1})
Group #1 Document number, up to 9 alphanumeric characters.
Group #2 Check digit on document number.
Group #3 Nationality. 3 letters country code.
Group #4 Holder’s date of birth.
Group #5 Check digit on the date of birth.
Group #6 Sex of holder.
Group #7 Date of expiry of the document.
Group #8 Check digit on the date of expiry.
Group #9 Optional data at the discretion of the issuing state.
Group #10 Check digit on the optional data.
Group #11 Overall check digit

Sample result (TD3#2)

Screenshot

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Visas

This format is defined in Machine Readable Travel Documents Part 7: Machine Readable Visas document and have two subtypes: MRVA and MRVB.

MRVA - Parsing and specification

Specification

Here is a sample image: Screenshot

Here is the format: Screenshot

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Parsing MRVA format

MRVA format has 2 lines, each has 44 characters.

Line 1 (MRVA#1)

Regular expression (MRVA#1)

Regular expression (V[A-Z0-9<]{1})([A-Z]{3})([A-Z0-9<]{39})
Group #1 Document type. `V` as the first character.
Group #2 3 letters country code.
Group #3 Primary Identifier.

Sample result (MRVA#1)

Screenshot

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Line 2 (MRVA#2)

Regular expression (MRVA#2)

Regular expression ([A-Z0-9<]{9})([0-9]{1})([A-Z]{3})([0-9]{6})([0-9]{1})([M|F|X|<]{1})([0-9]{6})([0-9]{1})([A-Z0-9<]{16})
Group #1 Document number, up to 9 alphanumeric characters.
Group #2 Check digit on document number.
Group #3 Nationality. 3 letters country code.
Group #4 Holder’s date of birth.
Group #5 Check digit on the date of birth.
Group #6 Sex of holder.
Group #7 Date of expiry of the document.
Group #8 Check digit on the date of expiry.
Group #9 Optional data at the discretion of the issuing state.

Sample result (MRVA#2)

Screenshot

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MRVB - Parsing and specification

Specification

Here is a sample image: Screenshot

Here is the format: Screenshot

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Parsing MRVB format

MRVB format has 2 lines, each has 36 characters.

Line 1 (MRVB#1)

Regular expression (MRVB#1)

Regular expression (V[A-Z0-9<]{1})([A-Z]{3})([A-Z0-9<]{31})
Group #1 Document type. `V` as the first character.
Group #2 3 letters country code.
Group #3 Primary Identifier.

Sample result (MRVB#1)

Screenshot

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Line 2 (MRVB#2)

Regular expression (MRVB#2)

Regular expression ([A-Z0-9<]{9})([0-9]{1})([A-Z]{3})([0-9]{6})([0-9]{1})([M|F|X|<]{1})([0-9]{6})([0-9]{1})([A-Z0-9<]{8})
Group #1 Document number, up to 9 alphanumeric characters.
Group #2 Check digit on document number.
Group #3 Nationality. 3 letters country code.
Group #4 Holder’s date of birth.
Group #5 Check digit on the date of birth.
Group #6 Sex of holder.
Group #7 Date of expiry of the document.
Group #8 Check digit on the date of expiry.
Group #9 Optional data at the discretion of the issuing state.

Sample result (MRVB#2)

Screenshot

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Data validation

What is nice with the MRZ / MRTD specifications is that they contain different check digits to make sure that the most important fields (document number, expiry date, date of birth…) are valid.

A check digit consists of a single digit computed from the other digits in a series. Check digits in the MRZ are calculated on specified numerical data elements in the MRZ. The check digits permit readers to verify that data in the MRZ is correctly interpreted.

A special check digit calculation has been adopted for use in MRTDs. The check digits shall be calculated on modulus 10 with a continuously repetitive weighting of 731 731 …, as follows:

  • Step 1. Going from left to right, multiply each digit of the pertinent numerical data element by the weighting figure appearing in the corresponding sequential position.
  • Step 2. Add the products of each multiplication.
  • Step 3. Divide the sum by 10 (the modulus).
  • Step 4. The remainder shall be the check digit.

For data elements in which the number does not occupy all available character positions, the symbol < shall be used to complete vacant positions and shall be given the value of zero for the purpose of calculating the check digit.

When the check digit calculation is applied to data elements containing alphabetic characters, the characters A to Z shall have the values 10 to 35 consecutively, as follows:

A 10
B 11
C 12
... ...
X 33
Y 34
Z 35

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Dev Tips

Debugging the Web Serial API in Chrome is easy with the internal page, about://device-log where you can see all serial device related events in one single place.

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Browsers support

Chrome
Chrome
IE / Edge
Edge
Firefox
Firefox
Opera
Opera
Safari
Safari
Chrome
Chrome Android
Firefox
Firefox Android
Opera
Opera Android
iOS Safari
iOS Safari
Samsung
Samsung
Serial 89 89 - 75 - - - - - -
getPorts 89 89 - 75 - - - - - -
requestPort 89 89 - 75 - - - - - -

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