vite-plugin-sharedworker
TypeScript icon, indicating that this package has built-in type declarations

0.2.0 • Public • Published

vite-plugin-sharedworker

CI version

Make SharedWorker works like Remote Procedure Call easily.

Installation

npm i -D vite-plugin-sharedworker
// vite.config.ts

import { defineConfig } from 'vite'
import SharedWorker from 'vite-plugin-sharedworker'

export default defineConfig({
  plugins: [
    SharedWorker()
  ]
})

Usage

All the scripts which endswith .sharedworker.ts or .sharedworker.js will be transformed as RPC shared worker.

You can just write functions and export them like what you usually do.

// src/math.sharedworker.ts

export async function add(a: number, b: number) {
  return a + b
}

export async function sub(a: number, b: number) {
  return a - b
}

Note

To make TypeScript return type work fine, you must export async functions, even if they are sync.

Then you can just import your shared worker script like what you usually do.

This plugin will transform your method call to send message to the shared worker, and receive return value from the shared worker.

// src/main.ts

import { add, sub } from './math.sharedworker'

const a = await add(1, 2)
const b = await sub(2, 1)

You can see a full example here.

Communication

Add vite-plugin-sharedworker/runtime to your tsconfig types.

Notice that you should create another tsconfig for your worker scirpts different from your client codes for the reason that they have different runtime.

{
  "compilerOptions": {
    "types": [
      "vite-plugin-sharedworker/runtime"
    ]
  }
}

Or you can add this command to the beginning of your worker scripts.

/// <reference types="vite-plugin-sharedworker/runtime">

Worker to Client

The transform hook automatically add the worker global variable to your script. Add the following type declaration to make type inference work.

declare const worker: SharedWorkerServer

Then, you can listen the incoming messages.

worker.addMessageListener((payload) => {
  console.log(payload)
  // ...
})

Or you can broadcast messages.

worker.broadcast('Hello, this is worker')

Or you can send messages to a specific port.

const ports = worker.ports()
if (ports.length > 0) {
  worker.dispatch(ports[0], 'You are the first port')
}

Client to Worker

The transform hook automatically add the client global variable to your script. Add the following type declaration to make type inference work.

declare const client: SharedWorkerClient;

export const dispatch = client.dispatch;

export const addMessageListener = client.addMessageListener;

Then, in your client code, you can listen the incoming messages from the worker.

import { addMessageListener } from '<worker path>'

addMessageListener((payload) => {
  console.log(payload)
  // ...
})

Or send messages to the worker.

import { dispatch } from '<worker path>'

dispatch('Hello, this is client')

Limitation

This plugin has some side effects to your scripts. If you encounter any problems with its transform, you can debug it with vite-plugin-inspect and create an issue here.

The transform hook adds the following global variables at the beginning of the input worker script, so that you can not re-define these variables at the global scope.

  • worker: used in the worker environment
  • client: used in the client environment
  • dispatch: used in the client environment
  • addMessageListener: used in the client environment

In the worker environment, you can only use the global variable worker. The reason for adding client-related variables is to make the module export type inference work. So you can just import the API client, dispatch and addMessageListener in your client code to do complex communications.

License

MIT License © 2023 XLor

Package Sidebar

Install

npm i vite-plugin-sharedworker

Weekly Downloads

0

Version

0.2.0

License

MIT

Unpacked Size

26.2 kB

Total Files

14

Last publish

Collaborators

  • yjl9903