Nicely Pointed Mandibles

    vanilla-milk
    TypeScript icon, indicating that this package has built-in type declarations

    0.4.0-beta.0 • Public • Published

    Vanilla Milk

    Simple library for building simple reactive web components.

    What is...

    Vanilla Milk is a library which helps create to web component which can be used on anywhere! Embrace future of web-component made it future-proof. Built-in reactive state and props but also is very small and fast.

    Vanilla Milk feature:

    • Reusable component.
    • Simple way for creating web components.
    • Milk DOM, a special implementation of DOM manipulation.
    • Reactive state and props.
    • No class, just function.
    • Life-cycle hooks.
    • Expressive Vanilla like API structure.
    • Very small (2.4kB gzipped on production).
    • Encapsulated style, ID and class name.
    • Zero dependencies.
    • TypeScript support.

    Milk DOM

    Vanilla Milk doesn't use Virtual DOM, instead it has its own Milk DOM which share the same idea with Virtual Dom, update where neccessary. Unlike VDOM, Milk DOM use a collection of Native Browser API to perform diffing instead of creating long list of object which also prevent heavy recursion. Drawback is diffing algorithm isn't as deep as Virtual DOM does but Milk DOM is blazing fast and has less memory consumption.

    Note: Milk DOM is in an very early stage of development, you might experience some bug and when that time came, you can always open the issue on this repo.

    Getting started

    Glad you're interested in! Let's get over quick start! Let us add library just for creating a component, after the component has been built, you don't have to install it anymore! Just moved the built components to your any project~

    Install Vanilla Milk

    Let install this real quick with package manager of your choice.

    // Using npm
    npm install vanilla-milk --save
     
    // Using yarn
    yarn add vanilla-milk

    Well done! Now you're ready to create a Milk Component! (Shortname for Vanilla Milk Component for the greater good.)

    Hello World! It's Milk Component!

    Let's start by building `milk-component', a traditional hello world for programmer but as web component.

    Milk Component are separated into 2 step:

    1. Define it with create
    2. Create it with define

    Just 2 step, that's all for building reactive web component.

    Create

    First of all, import create function from vanilla-milk. This function is responsible to create a model of component.

    import { create } from "vanilla-milk"

    First parameter is a callback to display HTML Element.

    import { create } from "vanilla-milk"
     
    const MilkComponent = create((display) => 
        display(`<h1>Hello World! Milk Component!</h1>`)
    )

    We have just create MilkComponent which will return <h1>Hello World</h1>

    Define

    Next we just have to define this component, so it can work like every HTML Element.
    But first, import define from vanilla-milk

    import { define } from "vanilla-milk"

    Now let's name the component milk-element, so it can be use in HTML. (Web Component need - to be declared, like milk-component which has - in it)

    import { create, define } from "vanilla-milk"
     
    const MilkComponent = create((display) => 
        display(`<h1>Hello World! Milk Component!</h1>`)
    )
     
    define("milk-component", MilkComponent)

    That's it! You have just created a Milk Component!! 🎉🎉

    Milk Component in action

    Soooo~ We have just created a web component, let's see it in action!
    Just add <milk-component></milk-component> in HTML. Make sure you've link the JavaScript file which contain milk component in it. You can use quick set-up like parcel.

    <!-- Any HTML here -->
    <html>
    <head>
        <title>Hello Milk Component</title>
        <script src="milk_component_here.js"></script> 
    </head>
    <body>
        <milk-component></milk-component>
    </body>
    </html>

    And it should display something like this.

    But that's not what make Vanilla Milk special...

    In Vanilla Milk, component are reactive which mean every time state or props changed, Milk Component will know it.

    State

    Like angular, react and vue, Vanilla Milk also has state.
    State is like a variable which are responsible for storing data and display it to view.

    Let's say we want to create a counter and display count to view. In Vanilla Milk we do like this.

    If you're familiar with React, we have useState. But it's not like what you might think.

    import { useState } from 'vanilla-milk'

    Vanilla Milk are designed to be expressive. So we separate the state, props and life-cycle to the second parameter of create like this.

    import { create, define, useState } from "vanilla-milk"
     
    const MilkComponent = create((display, state) => {
        let { count } = state
        
        return display(`<h1>Count ${count}</h1>`)
    },
    {
        counter: useState(0)
    })
     
    define("milk-component", MilkComponent)

    So, what's happend here?

    The second parameter of create are responsible for handling data, so we can separate and focus on each part.

    {
        count: useState(0)
    }
    

    Here we defined state name count with value of 0. useState is a function that say, "Hey! We want a state name 'count' with value of 0" to Vanilla Milk or something like that. Vanilla Milk will just handle the rest of that and pass the count to the second parameter of the view callback.

    const MilkComponent = create((display, state) => {
        console.log(state) // { count: 0 }
    },
    {
        count: useState(0)
    })
    

    Lastly, we display counter to the view.

    import { create, define, useState } from "vanilla-milk"
     
    const MilkComponent = create((display, state) => {
        return display(`<h1>Count ${state.count}</h1>`)
    },
    {
        count: useState(0)
    })
     
    define("milk-component", MilkComponent)

    Now that will display count to HTML, so... how do we set it in Vanilla Milk?

    As an early state of development of Vanilla Milk that's where the last parameter of create kick in!
    We add button and attach event in to it, so we can change the value of counter. // Hey don't make face of disappointment like that! I'll fix it in some next update, I promise! It's quite hard to create something like that ya know.

    Let add a button.

    import { create, define, useState } from "vanilla-milk"
     
    const MilkComponent = create((display, state) => {
        return display(`
            <h1>Count ${state.count}</h1>
            <button id="increase-count">Increase count</button>
        `)
    },
    {
        count: useState(0)
    })
     
    define("milk-component", MilkComponent)

    Vanilla Milk is declarative, this is where the last parameter come in!
    You define any events you want here! It's take callback function so you're free to define everything like normal JavaScript here. Vanilla Milk called this parameters as useEvents.

    import { create, define, useState } from "vanilla-milk"
     
    const MilkComponent = create((display, state, _, events) => {
        console.log(events) // { increaseCount: "increaseCount" }
     
        return display(`
            <h1>Count ${state.count}</h1>
            <button id="increase-count" @click="${events.increaseCount}">Increase count</button>
        `)
    },
    {
        count: useState(0)
    },
    ([state, set], _) => {
        let increaseCount = () => set.count(state.count + 1)
        
        return { increaseCount }
    })
     
    define("milk-component", MilkComponent)

    useEvents take an callback which pass [state, set] which are used to access state and set the state. Receive props and second parameter.

    *props will be explained in next section.
    ([state, set], props) => {
        let increaseCount = () => set.count(state.count + 1)
        
        return { increaseCount }
    })

    You might notice something there's @click in button, Vanilla Milk use pseudo attribute and match event to the node. This pseudo attribute take an export events name in useEvents.

    <button id="increase-count" @click="${events.increaseCount}">
        Increase count
    </button>

    Now everytime the button that as @click will run the function match to exports in useEvents, in this case it's increaseCount

    let increaseCount = () => set.count(state.count + 1)
     
    return { increaseCount }

    At here we get value of count from state.count and set it with set.count which came out with something like this:

    set.count(0 + 1) // Count is now 1

    Now it should increase the value of count everytime we click it!

    That's it! You've just achieve an advance concept like state of Vanilla Milk 🎉🎉

    Props

    Contrast to state, it's super simple. props is shorten for properties. A property is like a HTML attribute. For a button like:

    <button class="nice-button">Hello! I'm a button</button>

    class is a props of this button and it's value is "nice-button".

    As Milk Component, we also can have something like that! and guess what? You can create any attribute you like effortlessly!

    All you have to do is import useProps from vanilla-milk and set it like useState.

    import { useProps } from "vanilla-milk"

    Now let's say that we want to have a prop name hello. Like useState we do it like this:

    {
        count: useState(0),
        hello: useProps()
    }

    And access it like state

    create((display, state, props) => {
        console.log(props.hello) // null if there's no value passed
    })

    So let's define the component real quick to see how it work.

    import { create, define, useProps } from "vanilla-milk"
     
    const MilkComponent = create((display, state, props) => {
        return display(`<h1>hello ${props.hello}</h1>`)
    },{
        hello: useProps()
    })
     
    define("milk-component", MilkComponent)

    And in HTML

    <milk-component hello="world"></milk-component> // hello world

    The reason we have to define props so that Vanilla Milk can just update and listen only to the props you used!

    But there's one special props which is always available... children Children is any text or HTML Element between the Milk Component. In HTML:

    <milk-component>Hello World</milk-component>

    And access it:

    const MilkComponent = create((display, state, props) => {
        console.log(props.children) // Hello World
    })

    That's it! Unlike useState, useProps is super to use! 🎉🎉

    useEffect

    Like React, you can defined lifecycle with useEffect.

    Let's say, that you want to console.log() everytime prop hello change. You just have to import useEffect from vanilla-milk.

    import { useEffect } from "vanilla-milk"

    Again, add it to second paramter of create like useState and useProps

    {
        hello: useProps(),
        logHello: useEffect((state, props) => {
            console.log(props.hello) // Log everytime hello changed
        }, ["hello"])
    }

    Notice that we add array contain "hello" as string as the second parameter of useEffect. Because we can't directly access value of hello so we just add it as string, Vanilla Milk will take care of the rest (In fact, we can add it as variable but it takes an extra effort and performance cost).

    You can express name of useEffect as anything, It just easier to remind you lifecycle with name if there are too much lifecycle.

    Now we hello is changed, first callback will run. Like view callback, useEffect is paired with (state, props). You can directly access it in the callback.

    useEffect is not only limited to state but props too! You can also add useEffect as much as you want or many listener as much as you need!

    // State and Props
    {
        hello: useProps(),
        count: useState(),
        logHello: useEffect((state, props) => {
            console.log(props)
        }, ["count"])
    }
      
    // Multiple listener
    {
        hello: useProps(),
        count: useProps(),
        logHello: useEffect((state, props) => {
            console.log(props)
        }, ["count", "count"])
    }

    useShareState

    In medium to large architect JavaScript app. Shared state is very common. Mostly we add library which is responsible for share state with a common idea of store. eg: Redux.

    In Vanilla Milk, share state is built-in and it's easier than using a storage. All it need to do is to define state with useState and wrap it with useShareState.

    let sharedTea = useShareState({
        sugar: useState(1),
        amount: useState(100)
    })

    And then add to data layer like normal state. Make sure that useShareState isn't call in data layer otherwise it won't be able to share.

    let sharedTea = useShareState({
        sugar: useState(1),
        amount: useState(100)
    })
     
    const DisplaySugar = create(
        (display, _, props) =>
            display(`<h1>${props.sugar}</h1>`),
        {
            sharedStateFromWithComponent: sharedTea
        }
    )

    When state is shared, it'll act perfectly like local state unless it will update when itself is updated on other component.

    let sharedTea = useShareState({
        sugar: useState(1),
        amount: useState(100)
    })
     
    const DisplaySugar = create(
        (display, { sugar }) =>
            // Will update when set.sugar on other component is fired
            display(`<h1>${sugar}</h1>`),
        {
            sharedStateFromWithComponent: sharedTea
        }
    )
     
    const UpdateSugarButton = create(
        (display, _, props) =>
            display(`<button @click="addMoreSugar">Add more sugar</button>`),
        {
            /* You can defined any state name you want, even 
               if it's not the same with other component      */
     
            sharedStateFromWithComponent: sharedTea
        },
        ([{ sugar }, set) => {
         let addMoreSugar = () => set.sugar(sugar + 1) // When this is clicked, displa
            
            return { addMoreSugar }
        }
    )

    Milk DOM In depth

    Milk DOM cover a lot of thing under the cover but the main concept is to compare and diff DOM Node aimming for lesser iteration as possible (Same idea with VDOM). Instead of constructing an object node representation of DOM for comparing between two. Vanilla Milk heavily use Native Browser API comparing between each node instead of DOM and update it directly instead.

    Since Milk DOM is written in template string, it's very hard for Vanilla Milk to identify which textNode should replace Node or vice-versa. In this case, you shouldn't replace existed dom with blank text ("") like how React, Vue, other library does (which will sometime, occured an unexpected error). Instead Vanilla Milk offter a way to replace Node with blank Node by putting any element with attribute of __hidden__

    const MilkCard = create(
        (display, { isOpen }, { title, cover, children }, events) => {
            return display(`
                <main id="card" tabIndex=0>
                    <img id="cover" src="${cover}" alt="${title}" />
                    <section id="body">
                        <header id="header">
                            <h1 id="title">${title}</h1>
                            <button id="toggle" @click="${events.toggleCard}">+</button>
                        </header>
                        ${
                            isOpen
                                ? `<section id="detail">${children}</section>`
                                : `<input @hidden />`
                        }
                    </section>
                </main>
            `)
        },
        {
            title: useProps(),
            cover: useProps(),
            isOpen: useState(false),
            cardStyle: useStyleSheet("/card.css")
        },
        ([state, set], props) => {
            let toggleCard = () => set.isOpen(!state.isOpen)
     
            return { toggleCard }
        }
    )

    Milk DOM's diffing algorithm are seperated into 3 parts.

    • Diff - Diffing for the different attribute, child node, etc.
    • Hard Diff - When tagName are different, whole element node have to be replaced. Hard Diff take care of that preventing child node for being recursion.
    • Text Diff - Diffing for text different.

    Best practice

    To prevent an unexpected update, it's recommend to contained textNode in an element where textNode is state.

    import { create, useState } from "vanilla-milk"
     
    // Please don't
    let notSoGood = create((display, { counter }) => {
        return display(`
            <section>
                <h1>Counter: </h1>
                {counter}
            </section>
        `)
    })
     
    // Better~
    let wellDone = create((display) => {
        return display(`
            <section>
                <h1>
                    Counter: {state}
                </h1>
            </section>
        `)
    })

    Not only that storing textNode in an element are safer but also has better performance from prevent recursion between each node.

    Multiple node on root

    Unlike VDOM, Vanilla Milk use native DOM for diffing freeing root node from stucking with only one node on the top.

    import { create } from "vanilla-milk"
     
    // This is ok
    let multipleRootNode = create((display, { counter }) => {
        return display(`
            <h1>Hello! I'm the root node!</h1>
            <h2>No way! I'm the root node too!</h2>
            <p>It's ok to use multiple root node in Vanilla Milk</p>
        `)
    })

    Encapsulation

    Vanilla Milk use Shadow DOM to encapsulate logic and style. Preventing an unexpected change while working in multiple library.

    To use external stylesheet in Milk Component, you can assign stylesheet in the component instead

    import { create, useStyleSheet } from "vanilla-milk"
     
    // Link stylesheet in component.
    let coolCard = create((display, { counter }) => {
        return display(`
            <div class="card"></div>
        `)
    },
    {
        cardStyle: useStyleSheet("/card.css")
    })
     
    // Or even define style tag inside
    let coolCard = create(
        (display) => display(`
            <style>
                .card {
                    display: flex;
                    flex-direction: column;
                    width: 300px;
                    padding: 20px 12px;
                    borderRadius: 4px;
                    box-shadow: 0 4px 8px rgba(0,0,0,.25);
                }
            </style>
            <div class="card">
            </div>
        `)
    )

    That's pretty much it of Vanilla Milk. 🎉🎉

    Install

    npm i vanilla-milk

    DownloadsWeekly Downloads

    52

    Version

    0.4.0-beta.0

    License

    MIT

    Unpacked Size

    153 kB

    Total Files

    6

    Last publish

    Collaborators

    • aomkirby123