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valivar

6.2.1 • Public • Published

Valivar

Mostly derived from eivindfjeldstad/validate; Valivar provides dynamic schemas for modern javascript and typescript validation and sanitization. In Valivar you can use catch-all keys $ and * to define any array or object respectively, letting you define a single schema that can apply consistent rules for growing and changing datasets.


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Install

Node.js or Browser

npm install valivar

Deno

import valivar from "https://deno.land/x/valivar/mod.ts"

Import in HTML

<script type="text/javascript" src="dist/valivar.js"></script>

From CDN

<script type="text/javascript" src="https://unpkg.com/valivar"></script>

Examples

For a full list see the examples directory (coming)

Play with it

CodePen (suggested)

JSFiddle

Reademe rewrite in progress...

Usage

Define a schema and call .validate() with the object you want to validate. The .validate() function returns an array of validation errors.

import { Schema } from 'valivar'
 
const user = new Schema({
  username: {
    type: String,
    required: true,
    length: { min: 3, max: 32 }
  },
  pets: [{
    name: {
      type: String
      required: true
    },
    animal: {
      type: String
      enum: ['cat', 'dog', 'cow']
    }
  }],
  address: {
    street: {
      type: String,
      required: true
    },
    city: {
      type: String,
      required: true
    }
    zip: {
      type: String,
      match: /^[0-9]+$/,
      required: true
    }
  }
})
 
const errors = user.validate(obj)

Each error has a .path, describing the full path of the property that failed validation, and a .message describing the error.

errors[0].path //=> 'address.street'
errors[0].message //=> 'address.street is required.'

Custom error messages

You can override the default error messages by passing an object to Schema.message().

const post = new Schema({
  title: { required: true }
})
 
post.message({
  required: (path) => `${path} can not be empty.`
})
 
const [error] = post.validate({})
assert(error.message = 'title can not be empty.')

It is also possible to define messages for individual properties:

const post = new Schema({
  title: {
    required: true,
    message: 'Title is required.'
  }
})

And for individual validators:

const post = new Schema({
  title: {
    type: String,
    required: true,
    message: {
      type: 'Title must be a string.',
      required: 'Title is required.'
    }
  }
})

Nesting

Objects and arrays can be nested as deep as you want:

const event = new Schema({
  title: {
    type: String,
    required: true
  },
  participants: [{
    name: String,
    email: {
      type: String,
      required: true
    },
    things: [{
      name: String,
      amount: Number
    }]
  }]
})

Arrays can be defined implicitly, like in the above example, or explicitly:

const post = new Schema({
  keywords: {
    type: Array,
    each: { type: String }
  }
})

Array elements can also be defined individually:

const user = new Schema({
  something: {
    type: Array,
    elements: [
      { type: Number },
      { type: String }
    ]
  }
})

Nesting also works with schemas:

const user = new Schema({
  name: {
    type: String,
    required: true
  },
  email: {
    type: String,
    required: true
  }
})
 
const post = new Schema({
  title: {
    type: String,
    required: true
  },
  content: {
    type: String,
    required: true
  },
  author: user
})

If you think it should work, it probably works.

Naming conflicts

Validate will naively assume that a nested object where all property names are validators is not a nested object.

const schema = new Schema({
  pet: {
    type: {
      required: true,
      type: String,
      enum: ['cat', 'dog']
    }
  }
});

In this example, the pet.type property will be interpreted as a type rule, and the validations will not work as intended. To work around this we could use the slightly more verbose properties rule:

const schema = new Schema({
  pet: {
    properties: {
      type: {
        required: true,
        type: String,
        enum: ['cat', 'dog']
      }
    }
  }
});

In this case the type property of pets.properties will be interpreted as a nested property, and the validations will work as intended.

Custom validators

Custom validators can be defined by passing an object with named validators to .use:

const hexColor = val => /^#[0-9a-fA-F]$/.test(val)
 
const car = new Schema({
  color: {
    type: String,
    use: { hexColor }
  }
})

Define a custom error message for the validator:

car.message({
  hexColor: path => `${path} must be a valid color.`
})

Custom types

Pass a constructor to .type to validate against a custom type:

class Car {}
 
const user = new Schema({
  car: { type: Car }
})

Chainable API

If you want to avoid constructing large objects, you can add paths to a schema by using the chainable API:

const user = new Schema()
 
user
  .path('username').type(String).required()
  .path('address.zip').type(String).required()

Array elements can be defined by using $ as a placeholder for indices:

const user = new Schema()
user.path('pets.$').type(String)

This is equivalent to writing

const user = new Schema({ pets: [{ type: String }]})

Typecasting

Values can be automatically typecast before validation. To enable typecasting, pass an options object to the Schema constructor with typecast set to true.

const user = new Schema(definition, { typecast: true })

You can override this setting by passing an option to .validate().

user.validate(obj, { typecast: false })

To typecast custom types, you can register a typecaster:

class Car {}
 
const user = new Schema({
  car: { type: Car }
})
 
user.typecaster({
  Car: (val) => new Car(val)
})

Property stripping

By default, all values not defined in the schema will be stripped from the object. Set .strip = false on the options object to disable this behavior. This will likely be changed in a future version.

Strict mode

When strict mode is enabled, properties that are not defined in the schema will trigger a validation error. Set .strict = true on the options object to enable strict mode.

API

Install

npm i valivar

DownloadsWeekly Downloads

13

Version

6.2.1

License

MIT

Unpacked Size

280 kB

Total Files

15

Last publish

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