vague-date

A tiny JavaScript library that formats precise time differences as a vague/fuzzy date, e.g. 'yesterday', 'today' or 'next week'.

vagueDate.js

A tiny JavaScript library that formats precise time differences as a vague/fuzzy date, e.g. 'yesterday' or 'next week'.

npm install vague-date

To use vagueDate.js in a browser environment, you can either clone the git repository like so:

git clone git@github.com:philbooth/vagueDate.js.git

Or use one of the growing number of package managers, such as Jam, Ender (the package name for both is 'vague-date'), Bower ('vagueDate.js') or Component ('philbooth/vagueDate.js').

var vagueDate = require('vague-date');
<script type="text/javascript" src=".../vagueDate.js/src/vagueDate.min.js"></script>

vagueDate.js exports two public functions, get and set.

Returns a vague date string based on the argument(s) that you pass it.

The arguments are passed as properties on a single options object. The optional property from is a timestamp denoting the origin point from which the vague date will be calculated, defaulting to Date.now() if undefined. The optional property to is a timestamp denoting the target point to which the vague date will be calculated, defaulting to Date.now() if undefined. The optional property units is a string, denoting the units that the from and to timestamps are specified in, either 's' for seconds or 'ms' for milliseconds, defaulting to 'ms' if undefined.

Essentially, if to is less than from the returned vague date will indicate some point in the past. If to is greater than from it will indicate some point in the future.

TODO

TODO

The build environment relies on Node.js, NPM, Jake, JSHint, Mocha, Chai and UglifyJS. Assuming that you already have Node.js and NPM set up, you just need to run npm install to install all of the dependencies as listed in package.json.

The unit tests are in test/vagueDate.js. You can run them with the command npm test or jake test.