use-query-params
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2.2.1 • Public • Published

useQueryParams

A React Hook, HOC, and Render Props solution for managing state in URL query parameters with easy serialization.

Works with React Router out of the box. TypeScript supported.

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Installation | Usage | Examples | API | Demo


When creating apps with easily shareable URLs, you often want to encode state as query parameters, but all query parameters must be encoded as strings. useQueryParams allows you to easily encode and decode data of any type as query parameters with smart memoization to prevent creating unnecessary duplicate objects. It uses serialize-query-params.

Migrating from v1? See details in the changelog.

Installation

Using npm:

$ npm install --save use-query-params

Link your routing system via an adapter (e.g., React Router 6 example, React Router 5 example):

import React from 'react';
import ReactDOM from 'react-dom/client';
import { QueryParamProvider } from 'use-query-params';
import { ReactRouter6Adapter } from 'use-query-params/adapters/react-router-6';
import { BrowserRouter, Route, Routes } from 'react-router-dom';
import App from './App';

const root = ReactDOM.createRoot(
  document.getElementById('root') as HTMLElement
);
root.render(
  <BrowserRouter>
    <QueryParamProvider adapter={ReactRouter6Adapter}>
      <Routes>
        <Route path="/" element={<App />}>
      </Routes>
    </QueryParamProvider>
  </BrowserRouter>,
  document.getElementById('root')
);

By default, use-query-params uses URLSearchParams to handle interpreting the location string, which means it does not decode null and has limited handling of other more advanced URL parameter configurations. If you want access to those features, add a third-party library like query-string and tell use-query-params to use it:

import React from 'react';
import ReactDOM from 'react-dom/client';
import { QueryParamProvider } from 'use-query-params';
import { ReactRouter6Adapter } from 'use-query-params/adapters/react-router-6';
import { BrowserRouter, Route, Routes } from 'react-router-dom';
// optionally use the query-string parse / stringify functions to
// handle more advanced cases than URLSearchParams supports.
import { parse, stringify } from 'query-string';
import App from './App';

const root = ReactDOM.createRoot(
  document.getElementById('root') as HTMLElement
);
root.render(
  <BrowserRouter>
    <QueryParamProvider 
      adapter={ReactRouter6Adapter}
      options={{
        searchStringToObject: parse,
        objectToSearchString: stringify,
      }}
    >
      <Routes>
        <Route path="/" element={<App />}>
      </Routes>
    </QueryParamProvider>
  </BrowserRouter>,
  document.getElementById('root')
);
      

Usage

Be sure to add QueryParamProvider as shown in Installation above.

Add the hook to your component. There are two options: useQueryParam:

import * as React from 'react';
import { useQueryParam, NumberParam, StringParam } from 'use-query-params';

const UseQueryParamExample = () => {
  // something like: ?x=123&foo=bar in the URL
  const [num, setNum] = useQueryParam('x', NumberParam);
  const [foo, setFoo] = useQueryParam('foo', StringParam);

  return (
    <div>
      <h1>num is {num}</h1>
      <button onClick={() => setNum(Math.random())}>Change</button>
      <h1>foo is {foo}</h1>
      <button onClick={() => setFoo(`str${Math.random()}`)}>Change</button>
    </div>
  );
};

export default UseQueryParamExample;

Or useQueryParams:

import * as React from 'react';
import {
  useQueryParams,
  StringParam,
  NumberParam,
  ArrayParam,
  withDefault,
} from 'use-query-params';

// create a custom parameter with a default value
const MyFiltersParam = withDefault(ArrayParam, [])

const UseQueryParamsExample = () => {
  // something like: ?x=123&q=foo&filters=a&filters=b&filters=c in the URL
  const [query, setQuery] = useQueryParams({
    x: NumberParam,
    q: StringParam,
    filters: MyFiltersParam,
  });
  const { x: num, q: searchQuery, filters } = query;

  return (
    <div>
      <h1>num is {num}</h1>
      <button onClick={() => setQuery({ x: Math.random() })}>Change</button>
      <h1>searchQuery is {searchQuery}</h1>
      <h1>There are {filters.length} filters active.</h1>
      <button
        onClick={() =>
          setQuery(
            { x: Math.random(), filters: [...filters, 'foo'], q: 'bar' },
            'push'
          )
        }
      >
        Change All
      </button>
    </div>
  );
};

export default UseQueryParamsExample;
Or with the higher-order component (HOC) withQueryParams:
import * as React from 'react';
import {
  withQueryParams,
  StringParam,
  NumberParam,
  ArrayParam,
  withDefault,
} from 'use-query-params';

const WithQueryParamsExample = ({ query, setQuery }: any) => {
  const { x: num, q: searchQuery, filters } = query;

  return (
    <div>
      <h1>num is {num}</h1>
      <button onClick={() => setQuery({ x: Math.random() })}>Change</button>
      <h1>searchQuery is {searchQuery}</h1>
      <h1>There are {filters.length} filters active.</h1>
      <button
        onClick={() =>
          setQuery(
            { x: Math.random(), filters: [...filters, 'foo'], q: 'bar' },
            'push'
          )
        }
      >
        Change All
      </button>
    </div>
  );
};

// create a custom parameter with a default value
const MyFiltersParam = withDefault(ArrayParam, [])

export default withQueryParams({
  x: NumberParam,
  q: StringParam,
  filters: MyFiltersParam,
}, WithQueryParamsExample);
Or with render props via <QueryParams>:
import * as React from 'react';
import {
  QueryParams,
  StringParam,
  NumberParam,
  ArrayParam,
  withDefault,
} from 'use-query-params';

// create a custom parameter with a default value
const MyFiltersParam = withDefault(ArrayParam, [])

const RenderPropsExample = () => {
  const queryConfig = {
    x: NumberParam,
    q: StringParam,
    filters: MyFiltersParam,
  };
  return (
    <div>
      <QueryParams config={queryConfig}>
        {({ query, setQuery }) => {
          const { x: num, q: searchQuery, filters } = query;
          return (
            <>
              <h1>num is {num}</h1>
              <button onClick={() => setQuery({ x: Math.random() })}>
                Change
              </button>
              <h1>searchQuery is {searchQuery}</h1>
              <h1>There are {filters.length} filters active.</h1>
              <button
                onClick={() =>
                  setQuery(
                    {
                      x: Math.random(),
                      filters: [...filters, 'foo'],
                      q: 'bar',
                    },
                    'push'
                  )
                }
              >
                Change All
              </button>
            </>
          );
        }}
      </QueryParams>
    </div>
  );
};

export default RenderPropsExample;

Examples

A few basic examples have been put together to demonstrate how useQueryParams works with different routing systems.

API

For convenience, use-query-params exports all of the serialize-query-params library.

UrlUpdateType

The UrlUpdateType is a string type definings the different methods for updating the URL:

  • 'pushIn': Push just a single parameter, leaving the rest as is (back button works) (the default)
  • 'push': Push all parameters with just those specified (back button works)
  • 'replaceIn': Replace just a single parameter, leaving the rest as is
  • 'replace': Replace all parameters with just those specified

Param Types

See all param definitions from serialize-query-params here. You can define your own parameter types by creating an object with an encode and a decode function. See the existing definitions for examples.

Note that all null and empty values are typically treated as follows:

Note that with the default searchStringToObject implementation that uses URLSearchParams, null and empty values are treated as follows:

value encoding
"" ?qp=
null ? (removed from URL)
undefined ? (removed from URL)

If you need a more discerning interpretation, you can use query-string's parse and stringify to get:

value encoding
"" ?qp=
null ?qp
undefined ? (removed from URL)

Examples in this table assume query parameter named qp.

Param Type Example Decoded Example Encoded
StringParam string 'foo' ?qp=foo
NumberParam number 123 ?qp=123
ObjectParam { key: string } { foo: 'bar', baz: 'zzz' } ?qp=foo-bar_baz-zzz
ArrayParam string[] ['a','b','c'] ?qp=a&qp=b&qp=c
JsonParam any { foo: 'bar' } ?qp=%7B%22foo%22%3A%22bar%22%7D
DateParam Date Date(2019, 2, 1) ?qp=2019-03-01
BooleanParam boolean true ?qp=1
NumericObjectParam { key: number } { foo: 1, bar: 2 } ?qp=foo-1_bar-2
DelimitedArrayParam string[] ['a','b','c'] ?qp=a_b_c
DelimitedNumericArrayParam number[] [1, 2, 3] ?qp=1_2_3

Example

import { ArrayParam, useQueryParam, useQueryParams } from 'use-query-params';

// typically used with the hooks:
const [foo, setFoo] = useQueryParam('foo', ArrayParam);
// - OR -
const [query, setQuery] = useQueryParams({ foo: ArrayParam });

Example with Custom Param

You can define your own params if the ones shipped with this package don't work for you. There are included serialization utility functions to make this easier, but you can use whatever you like.

import {
  encodeDelimitedArray,
  decodeDelimitedArray
} from 'use-query-params';

/** Uses a comma to delimit entries. e.g. ['a', 'b'] => qp?=a,b */
const CommaArrayParam = {
  encode: (array: string[] | null | undefined) =>
    encodeDelimitedArray(array, ','),

  decode: (arrayStr: string | string[] | null | undefined) =>
    decodeDelimitedArray(arrayStr, ',')
};

useQueryParam

useQueryParam<T>(name: string, paramConfig?: QueryParamConfig<T>, options?: QueryParamOptions):
  [T | undefined, (newValue: T, updateType?: UrlUpdateType) => void]

Given a query param name and query parameter configuration { encode, decode } return the decoded value and a setter for updating it. If you do not provide a paramConfig, it inherits it from what was defined in the QueryParamProvider, falling back to StringParam if nothing is found.

The setter takes two arguments (newValue, updateType) where updateType is one of 'pushIn' | 'push' | 'replaceIn' | 'replace', defaulting to 'pushIn'.

You can override options from the QueryParamProvider with the third argument. See QueryParamOptions for details.

Example

import { useQueryParam, NumberParam } from 'use-query-params';

// reads query parameter `foo` from the URL and stores its decoded numeric value
const [foo, setFoo] = useQueryParam('foo', NumberParam);
setFoo(500);
setFoo(123, 'push');

// to unset or remove a parameter set it to undefined and use pushIn or replaceIn update types
setFoo(undefined) // ?foo=123&bar=zzz becomes ?bar=zzz

// functional updates are also supported:
setFoo((latestFoo) => latestFoo + 150)

useQueryParams

// option 1: pass only a config with possibly some options
useQueryParams<QPCMap extends QueryParamConfigMapWithInherit>(
  paramConfigMap: QPCMap,
  options?: QueryParamOptions
): [DecodedValueMap<QPCMap>, SetQuery<QPCMap>];

// option 2: pass an array of param names, relying on predefined params for types
useQueryParams<QPCMap extends QueryParamConfigMapWithInherit>(
  names: string[],
  options?: QueryParamOptions
): [DecodedValueMap<QPCMap>, SetQuery<QPCMap>];

// option 3: pass no args, get all params back that were predefined in a proivder
useQueryParams<QPCMap extends QueryParamConfigMapWithInherit>(
): [DecodedValueMap<QPCMap>, SetQuery<QPCMap>];

Given a query parameter configuration (mapping query param name to { encode, decode }), return an object with the decoded values and a setter for updating them.

The setter takes two arguments (newQuery, updateType) where updateType is one of 'pushIn' | 'push' | 'replaceIn' | 'replace', defaulting to 'pushIn'.

You can override options from the QueryParamProvider with the options argument. See QueryParamOptions for details.

Example

import { useQueryParams, StringParam, NumberParam } from 'use-query-params';

// reads query parameters `foo` and `bar` from the URL and stores their decoded values
const [query, setQuery] = useQueryParams({ foo: NumberParam, bar: StringParam });
setQuery({ foo: 500 })
setQuery({ foo: 123, bar: 'zzz' }, 'push');

// to unset or remove a parameter set it to undefined and use pushIn or replaceIn update types
setQuery({ foo: undefined }) // ?foo=123&bar=zzz becomes ?bar=zzz

// functional updates are also supported:
setQuery((latestQuery) => ({ foo: latestQuery.foo + 150 }))

Example with Custom Parameter Type Parameter types are just objects with { encode, decode } functions. You can provide your own if the provided ones don't work for your use case.

import { useQueryParams } from 'use-query-params';

const MyParam = {
  encode(value) {
    return `${value * 10000}`;
  },

  decode(strValue) {
    return parseFloat(strValue) / 10000;
  }
}

// ?foo=10000 -> query = { foo: 1 }
const [query, setQuery] = useQueryParams({ foo: MyParam });

// goes to ?foo=99000
setQuery({ foo: 99 })

withQueryParams

withQueryParams<QPCMap extends QueryParamConfigMap, P extends InjectedQueryProps<QPCMap>>
  (paramConfigMap: QPCMap, WrappedComponent: React.ComponentType<P>):
      React.FC<Diff<P, InjectedQueryProps<QPCMap>>>

Given a query parameter configuration (mapping query param name to { encode, decode }) and a component, inject the props query and setQuery into the component based on the config.

The setter takes two arguments (newQuery, updateType) where updateType is one of 'pushIn' | 'push' | 'replaceIn' | 'replace', defaulting to 'pushIn'.

Example

import { withQueryParams, StringParam, NumberParam } from 'use-query-params';

const MyComponent = ({ query, setQuery, ...others }) => {
  const { foo, bar } = query;
  return <div>foo = {foo}, bar = {bar}</div>
}

// reads query parameters `foo` and `bar` from the URL and stores their decoded values
export default withQueryParams({ foo: NumberParam, bar: StringParam }, MyComponent);

Note there is also a variant called withQueryParamsMapped that allows you to do a react-redux style mapStateToProps equivalent. See the code or this example for details.


QueryParams

<QueryParams config={{ foo: NumberParam }}>
  {({ query, setQuery }) => <div>foo = {query.foo}</div>}
</QueryParams>

Given a query parameter configuration (mapping query param name to { encode, decode }) and a component, provide render props query and setQuery based on the config.

The setter takes two arguments (newQuery, updateType) where updateType is one of 'pushIn' | 'push' | 'replaceIn' | 'replace', defaulting to 'pushIn'.


encodeQueryParams

encodeQueryParams<QPCMap extends QueryParamConfigMap>(
  paramConfigMap: QPCMap,
  query: Partial<DecodedValueMap<QPCMap>>
): EncodedQueryWithNulls

Convert the values in query to strings via the encode functions configured in paramConfigMap. This can be useful for constructing links using decoded query parameters.

Example

import { encodeQueryParams, NumberParam } from 'use-query-params';
// since v1.0 stringify is not exported from 'use-query-params',
// so you must install the 'query-string' package in case you need it
import { stringify } from 'query-string';

// encode each parameter according to the configuration
const encodedQuery = encodeQueryParams({ foo: NumberParam }, { foo });
const link = `/?${stringify(encodedQuery)}`;

QueryParamProvider

// choose an adapter, depending on your router
import { ReactRouter6Adapter } from 'use-query-params/adapters/react-router-6';
import { ReactRouter5Adapter } from 'use-query-params/adapters/react-router-5';
<QueryParamProvider adapter={ReactRouter6Adapter}><App /></QueryParamProvider>

// optionally specify options
import { parse, stringify } from 'query-string';
const options = {
  searchStringToObject: parse,
  objectToSearchString: stringify,
}
<QueryParamProvider adapter={ReactRouter6Adapter} options={options}>
  <App />
</QueryParamProvider>

// optionally nest parameters in options to get automatically on useQueryParams calls
<QueryParamProvider adapter={ReactRouter6Adapter} options={{
  params: { foo: NumberParam }
}}>
  <App> {/* useQueryParams calls have access to foo here */}
    ...
    <Page1>
      <QueryParamProvider options={{ params: { bar: BooleanParam }}}>
        ... {/* useQueryParams calls have access to foo and bar here */}
      </QueryParamProvider>
    </Page1>
    ...
  </App>
</QueryParamProvider>

The QueryParamProvider component links your routing library's history to the useQueryParams hook. It is needed for the hook to be able to update the URL and have the rest of your app know about it.

You can specify global options at the provider level.

QueryParamOptions
option default description
updateType "pushIn" How the URL gets updated by default, one of: replace, replaceIn, push, pushIn.
searchStringToObject from serialize-query-params How to convert the search string e.g. ?foo=123&bar=x into an object. Default uses URLSearchParams, but you could also use parse from query-string for example. `(searchString: string) => Record<string, string
objectToSearchString from serialize-query-params How to convert an object (e.g. { foo: 'x' } -> foo=x into a search string – no "?" included). Default uses URLSearchParams, but you could also use stringify from query-string for example. `(query: Record<string, string
params undefined Define parameters at the provider level to be automatically available to hook calls. Type is QueryParamConfigMap, e.g. { params: { foo: NumberParam, bar: BooleanParam }}
includeKnownParams undefined When true, include all parameters that were configured via the params option on a QueryParamProvider. Default behavior depends on the arguments passed to useQueryParams (if not specifying any params, it is true, otherwise false).
includeAllParams false Include all parameters found in the URL even if not configured in any param config.
removeDefaultsFromUrl false When true, removes parameters from the URL when set is called if their value is the same as their default (based on the default attribute of the Param object, typically populated by withDefault())
enableBatching false experimental - turns on batching (i.e., multiple consecutive calls to setQueryParams in a row only result in a single update to the URL). Currently marked as experimental since we need to update all the tests to verify no issues occur, feedback welcome.

Development

Run the typescript compiler in watch mode:

npm run dev

You can run an example app:

npm link
cd examples/react-router
npm install
npm link use-query-params
npm start

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