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tweet-patch

2.0.5 • Public • Published

tweet-patch

Build Status

Convert plain-text back into twitter-ready markup.

Version 2.0

Version 2.0 of this module no longer attempts to locate/use the data.entities objects from the Twitter API returned data. It will, however, use the data.entities.urls array from the Twitter data (if available) to determine if there is a media url attached to the end of the plain-text tweet by the Twitter API. You can use the stripTrailingUrl option to remove this trailing media url if you are serving plain-text tweets without embedded media support.

Install

$ npm install --save tweet-patch

Usage

Option 01: Pass in a string with urls, hashtags and user-mentions:

var tweetPatch = require('tweet-patch');
 
tweetPatch('@SomeUser, go check out this #awesome #thing http://t.co/a01234!');

Option 02: Pass in a Twitter Object from the Twitter API:

var tweetPatch = require('tweet-patch');
 
const tweetObj = {
    text: '@SomeUser, go check out this #awesome #thing http://t.co/a01234!',
    entities: {
        urls: [...],
        // ...
    }
}
    
tweetPatch(tweetObj);

Both examples above would result in the following return string (formatted for readability):

'<a href="https://twitter.com/SomeUser">@SomeUser</a> go, check out this 
 <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/awesome">#awesome</a> 
 <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/thing">#thing</a> 
 <a href="http://t.co/a01234">http://t.co/a01234</a>!'

API

tweetPath(data, [options])

data

Required
Type: object string

The tweet object returned from the Twitter API, or a string containing hashtags, urls and user-mentions.

options

hrefProps

Type: object string
Default: None

Pass in an object and the key:value pairs will be assigned to the anchor tags that are created (uses obj-to-property-string). Pass in a string, and that string will be assigned to the url anchor tags as-is.

Examples:

// Using an object
tweetpatch('#hi https://t.co/123', {hrefProps: {class: 'myClass'}});
//=> '<a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/hi">#hi</a> <a href="https://t.co/123" class="myClass">https://t.co/123</a>'
 
// Using a string
tweetpatch('#hi https://t.co/123', {hrefProps: 'class="myClass"'});
//=> '<a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/hi">#hi</a> <a href="https://t.co/123" class="myClass">https://t.co/123</a>'
stripTrailingUrl

Type: Boolean
Default: false

This is only used if you have supplied a data object returned from the Twitter API, and that object has the entities.urls property. The reason for this is because we only want to strip the trailing media url if you are serving plain-text tweets, (no media support) and you want to clean up the tweet text. This option only works when you have supplied a Tweet object with Twitter's entities.urls property to ensure that we aren't deleting actual urls put there by the tweet author.

useExistingHTML

Type: Boolean
Default: false

This is only used if you have supplied a data object returned from the Twitter API, and the Twitter API has supplied an html property on that object for you.

Known Limitations

  • Some tweets will be formatted in a way that makes it impossible to accurately parse the data. For example, if a url is typed inside of parenthesis: (http://t.co/foo) tweet-patch will see the closing parenthesis as part of the url. For more information, see issue #8.

License

MIT @ Michael Wuergler

install

npm i tweet-patch

Downloadsweekly downloads

30

version

2.0.5

license

MIT

homepage

github.com

repository

Gitgithub

last publish

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