Nacho Printing Machine

    trough
    TypeScript icon, indicating that this package has built-in type declarations

    2.1.0 • Public • Published

    trough

    Build Coverage Downloads Size

    trough is middleware.

    Contents

    What is this?

    trough is like ware with less sugar. Middleware functions can also change the input of the next.

    The word trough (/trôf/) means a channel used to convey a liquid.

    When should I use this?

    You can use this package when you’re building something that accepts “plugins”, which are functions, that can be sync or async, promises or callbacks.

    Install

    This package is ESM only. In Node.js (version 12.20+, 14.14+, or 16.0+), install with npm:

    npm install trough

    In Deno with esm.sh:

    import {trough} from "https://esm.sh/trough@2"

    In browsers with esm.sh:

    <script type="module">
      import {trough} from "https://esm.sh/trough@2?bundle"
    </script>

    Use

    import process from 'node:process'
    import fs from 'node:fs'
    import path from 'node:path'
    import {trough} from 'trough'
    
    const pipeline = trough()
      .use(function (fileName) {
        console.log('Checking… ' + fileName)
      })
      .use(function (fileName) {
        return path.join(process.cwd(), fileName)
      })
      .use(function (filePath, next) {
        fs.stat(filePath, function (error, stats) {
          next(error, {filePath, stats})
        })
      })
      .use(function (ctx, next) {
        if (ctx.stats.isFile()) {
          fs.readFile(ctx.filePath, next)
        } else {
          next(new Error('Expected file'))
        }
      })
    
    pipeline.run('readme.md', console.log)
    pipeline.run('node_modules', console.log)

    Yields:

    Checking… readme.md
    Checking… node_modules
    Error: Expected file
        at ~/example.js:22:12
        at wrapped (~/node_modules/trough/index.js:111:16)
        at next (~/node_modules/trough/index.js:62:23)
        at done (~/node_modules/trough/index.js:145:7)
        at ~/example.js:15:7
        at FSReqCallback.oncomplete (node:fs:199:5)
    null <Buffer 23 20 74 72 6f 75 67 68 0a 0a 5b 21 5b 42 75 69 6c 64 5d 5b 62 75 69 6c 64 2d 62 61 64 67 65 5d 5d 5b 62 75 69 6c 64 5d 0a 5b 21 5b 43 6f 76 65 72 61 ... 7994 more bytes>
    

    API

    This package exports the identifiers trough and wrap. There is no default export.

    trough()

    Create a new Trough.

    wrap(middleware, callback)(…input)

    Call middleware with all input. If middleware accepts more arguments than given in input, an extra done function is passed in after the input when calling it. In that case, done must be called.

    The first value in input is the main input value. All other input values are the rest input values. The values given to callback are the input values, merged with every non-nullish output value.

    • If middleware throws an error, returns a promise that is rejected, or calls the given done function with an error, callback is called with that error
    • If middleware returns a value or returns a promise that is resolved, that value is the main output value
    • If middleware calls done, all non-nullish values except for the first one (the error) overwrite the output values

    Trough

    A pipeline.

    Trough#run([input…, ]done)

    Run the pipeline (all use()d middleware). Calls done on completion with either an error or the output of the last middleware.

    👉 Note: as the length of input defines whether async functions get a next function, it’s recommended to keep input at one value normally.

    function done(err?, [output…])

    The final handler passed to run(), called with an error if a middleware function rejected, passed, or threw one, or the output of the last middleware function.

    Trough#use(fn)

    Add fn, a middleware function, to the pipeline.

    function fn([input…, ][next])

    A middleware function called with the output of its predecessor.

    Synchronous

    If fn returns or throws an error, the pipeline fails and done is called with that error.

    If fn returns a value (neither null nor undefined), the first input of the next function is set to that value (all other input is passed through).

    The following example shows how returning an error stops the pipeline:

    import {trough} from 'trough'
    
    trough()
      .use(function (thing) {
        return new Error('Got: ' + thing)
      })
      .run('some value', console.log)

    Yields:

    Error: Got: some value
        at ~/example.js:5:12
        …
    

    The following example shows how throwing an error stops the pipeline:

    import {trough} from 'trough'
    
    trough()
      .use(function (thing) {
        throw new Error('Got: ' + thing)
      })
      .run('more value', console.log)

    Yields:

    Error: Got: more value
        at ~/example.js:5:11
        …
    

    The following example shows how the first output can be modified:

    import {trough} from 'trough'
    
    trough()
      .use(function (thing) {
        return 'even ' + thing
      })
      .run('more value', 'untouched', console.log)

    Yields:

    null 'even more value' 'untouched'
    
    Promise

    If fn returns a promise, and that promise rejects, the pipeline fails and done is called with the rejected value.

    If fn returns a promise, and that promise resolves with a value (neither null nor undefined), the first input of the next function is set to that value (all other input is passed through).

    The following example shows how rejecting a promise stops the pipeline:

    import {trough} from 'trough'
    
    trough()
      .use(function (thing) {
        return new Promise(function (resolve, reject) {
          reject('Got: ' + thing)
        })
      })
      .run('thing', console.log)

    Yields:

    Got: thing
    

    The following example shows how the input isn’t touched by resolving to null.

    import {trough} from 'trough'
    
    trough()
      .use(function () {
        return new Promise(function (resolve) {
          setTimeout(function () {
            resolve(null)
          }, 100)
        })
      })
      .run('Input', console.log)

    Yields:

    null 'Input'
    
    Asynchronous

    If fn accepts one more argument than the given input, a next function is given (after the input). next must be called, but doesn’t have to be called async.

    If next is given a value (neither null nor undefined) as its first argument, the pipeline fails and done is called with that value.

    If next is given no value (either null or undefined) as the first argument, all following non-nullish values change the input of the following function, and all nullish values default to the input.

    The following example shows how passing a first argument stops the pipeline:

    import {trough} from 'trough'
    
    trough()
      .use(function (thing, next) {
        next(new Error('Got: ' + thing))
      })
      .run('thing', console.log)

    Yields:

    Error: Got: thing
        at ~/example.js:5:10
    

    The following example shows how more values than the input are passed.

    import {trough} from 'trough'
    
    trough()
      .use(function (thing, next) {
        setTimeout(function () {
          next(null, null, 'values')
        }, 100)
      })
      .run('some', console.log)

    Yields:

    null 'some' 'values'
    

    Types

    This package is fully typed with TypeScript.

    Compatibility

    This package is at least compatible with all maintained versions of Node.js. As of now, that is Node.js 12.20+, 14.14+, and 16.0+. It also works in Deno and modern browsers.

    Security

    This package is safe.

    Contribute

    Yes please! See How to Contribute to Open Source.

    License

    MIT © Titus Wormer

    Install

    npm i trough

    DownloadsWeekly Downloads

    8,042,420

    Version

    2.1.0

    License

    MIT

    Unpacked Size

    16.8 kB

    Total Files

    5

    Last publish

    Collaborators

    • wooorm