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    strong-globalize
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    6.0.5 • Public • Published

    strong-globalize

    This module is the runtime library for globalization.

    Supported Node.js versions

    Node 10.x latest version and above are supported.

    Table of contents

    Architecture

    strong-globalize is built on top of two foundation layers: Unicode CLDR and jquery/globalize. The Unicode CLDR provides key building blocks for software to support the world's languages, with the largest and most extensive standard repository of locale data available. jquery/globalize is a JavaScript library for internationalization and localization that leverages the Unicode CLDR JSON data. The library works both for the browser and as a Node.js module.

    strong-globalize is a JavaScript library for internationalization and localization (globalization in one word) of a Node.js package. strong-globalize provides these features:

    As shown in the Demo section, the code written with strong-globalize is simpler, better structured, and easier to read than the original code written as an English-only product; and more importantly, you get all the features at no extra effort.

    With strong-globalize, there will be no more 'English product first and worry about localization later'; there will be only one globalized codebase from day one. If you choose, you can still ship it with a few language resources (or English only) initially and incrementally add, remove, or update the resources and ship anytime as you go.

    • node.js versions: 8, 10
    • cldr version: 32.0.1
    • out-of-box languages - 31: de, en, es, fr, it, ja, ko, pt, ru, zh-Hans, zh-Hant', ar', 'bn', 'cs', 'el', 'fi', 'hi', 'id', 'lt', 'nb', 'nl', 'pl', 'ro', 'sl', 'sv', 'ta', 'te', 'th', 'tr', 'uk', 'vi'

    You can customize (add/remove) any languages supported by the Unicode CLDR in your strong-globalize installation.

    About test

    The line test coverage with and without core part of translation tests are currently 90% and 80% respectively.

    With the out-of-box setting, npm test runs all tests but the core translation tests because it requires connection to the machine translation service. To enable the machine translation, please set the environment variables described in this section.

    With custom setting such as customized language configuration, some tests may fail. You can edit target messages in the failing test modules to suit your custom setting. To do so, set DEBUG global variable of test/slt-test-helper.js and run the test, identify the actual error messages, then copy and paste the actual error messages to the failing test modules.

    Autonomous message loading

    All packages are created equal. Autonomous Message Loading is the core concept of strong-globalize designed for globalization of modular and highly distributed Nodejs applications. Two key terminologies are root directory and master root directory:

    root directory or simply rootDir: the package's current working directory where intl directory resides.

    master root directory: the root directory of the package that called SG.SetRootDir first. Any package in the application can be the master root directory. It's determined solely by the loading order and once the master is chosen, it does not change in the application's life. Usually, the master root directory is the root directory of the package at the root of the application's dependency tree. slt-globalize -d must run under the master root directory so that all the string resources in the application are extracted and stored under the master root directory's intl/en.

    Once all the string resource files are deep-extracted and translated at the top level package, the original string resources in the dependencies should not be loaded. To disable loading the string resources in the dependencies, set autonomousMsgLoading to none in the SetRootDir call of the top level package. Since 'none' is the default, simply SG.SetRootDir(rootDir) does it.

    In development phase, with regular extraction mode, {autonomousMsgLoading: 'all'} must be set so that string resource included in each dependent package will be used.

    Third option is to set specific package names of which the string resources get loaded. One use case of the third option is that you have several dependent packages which you know are properly translated and the translation can be used as-is. For all the other packages, message strings will be deep-extracted and translated.

    const SG = require('strong-globalize');
    SG.SetRootDir(__dirname, {autonomousMsgLoading: 'none'}); // same as SG.SetRootDir(__dirname);
    const g = new SG({language: 'en'});
     
    // use formatters and wrappers API
     
    g.log('Welcome!');

    For example, the following does not work as intended because the package sub calls SG.SetRootDir first:

    // main/index.js -- my root package
    const SG = require('strong-globalize');
    const request = require('request');
    const sub = require('sub');
     
    SG.SetRootDir(__dirname);
    const g = new SG();
     
    ...
    // sub/index.js -- my sub package
    const SG = require('strong-globalize');
    const request = require('request');
     
    SG.SetRootDir(__dirname);
    const g = new SG();
     
    ...
     

    The 'MUST' coding practice is to call SG.SetRootDir in the very first line of the main module in each package:

    // main/index.js -- my root package
    const SG = require('strong-globalize');
    SG.SetRootDir(__dirname);
    const request = require('request');
    const sub = require('sub');
     
    const g = new SG();
     
    ...
    // sub/index.js -- my sub package
    const SG = require('strong-globalize');
    SG.SetRootDir(__dirname);
    const request = require('request');
     
    const g = new SG();
     
    ...
     

    More concise coding is as follows:

    // main/index.js -- my root package
    const g = require('strong-globalize')(__dirname);
    const request = require('request');
    const sub = require('sub');
     
    ...
    // sub/index.js -- my sub package
    const g = require('strong-globalize')();
    const request = require('request');
     
    ...
     

    Language config customization

    Out of box, one CLDR file is included in strong-globalize/cldr directory. CLDR stands for Common Locale Data Repository. In the installation of strong-globalize for your production deployment, you can replace the out-of-box CLDR file entirely, or add extra CLDR data to the cldr directory. There are approximately 450 locales (language/culture variations) defined in the Unicode CLDR. Among them, there are 40+ variations of French and 100+ variations of English.

    strong-globalize provides a utility tool under util directory. The tool assembles only the languages you need to support in your strong-globalize installation. For example, the out-of-box gz file for the 11 languages is 135KB. See README of the utility under util directory.

    In runtime, strong-globalize dynamically loads to memory just the CLDR data required for the specific language by setLanguage(). First, it examines all the gz files under cldr directory in alphabetical order, then searches for the language. If the language is defined in two or more CLDR files, duplicate objects will be overwritten in the examination order.

    Message string resource

    English string resource files must exist under intl/en directory. Translated string resource files are stored on each language sub-directory under intl If a message is not found in the translated resource files, the corresponding English message is displayed.

    CLDR data has no dependencies on string resources. For example, you can load 100 language CLDR data and no translated string resources but the English string resource. However, if there is a translated non-English string resource exists for language xx under intl/xx the CLDR data for xx must be loaded. xx is one of the languages defined in the CLDR file(s).

    Runtime language switching

    There are two primary types of Node.js packages strong-globalize is targeting:

    • Command line interface utility (short life; static language setting) such as slt-globalize itself,
    • Web applications such as LoopBack apps (long life; dynamic language switching to respect browser language set in HTTP Accept-Language header. See `negotiator' on npmjs.com).

    Common part

    const SG = require('strong-globalize');
    SG.SetRootDir(__dirname);
    const g = new SG(); // use the default

    Static language setting in CLI utility

    // the common part comes here.
     
    // then, use formatters and wrappers API always in the same language
    g.log('Welcome!');

    Dynamic language switching in Web application

    Setting language to strong-globalize instance is pretty cheap. CLDR data set and translated messages are preloaded at the initial use.

    // the common part comes here.
     
    // set language first, then, use formatters and wrappers API
    // See 'negotiator' on Npmjs.com for 'getAcceptLanguage()'
    g.setLanguage(getAcceptLanguage()); // once per session
     
    g.log('Welcome!');

    Pseudo localization support

    strong-globalize has a feature similar to traditional pseudo localization.

    First, Machine Translation with slt-globalize -t can be used like the traditional pseudo localization. See the CLI - extract, lint, and translate section for details of slt-globalize -t command.

    Second, in runtime, set the environment variable STRONG_GLOBALIZE_PSEUDO_LOC_PREAMBLE and strong-globalize adds the string in front of every message processed by the message formatter. If you already have translated message files (by machine or human) and set the language, the string is added to every message in that language.

    Third, strong-globalize reserves the language code zz as pseudo-language. slt-globalize -e generates intl/zz/messages.json and intl/zz/messages_inverted.json which show the location of each message extracted from JS files.

    Note that strong-globalize does not use intl/zz/*.json in runtime. They are reference only. They are useful to detect globalization bugs usually called hard-coded strings. For example, intl/en/messages.json shows "Shipping cost is {0}." string is properly globalized and extracted to intl/en/messages.json with the auto-generated message key as "77decb50aa6360f0dc9c8ded9086b94e". intl/zz/messages.json shows the string is located at line#31 of index.js as the argument of function call g.log. intl/zz/messages_inverted.json shows that at the line#20 of index.js there is a string "%s Hello %s" as the first argument of util.format which looks like a globalization bug.

    Also note that slt-globalize -e extracts the first argument of every function call if it's a literal string or concatenation of literal strings. Literal strings in other arguments of function calls are NOT extracted.

    intl/en/messages.json:

    {
      "77decb50aa6360f0dc9c8ded9086b94e": "Shipping cost is {0}.",
      "b5d4af08bf61e58d375923977290d67b": "Listening on {0} by {1}."
    }
    

    intl/zz/messages.json:

    {
      "77decb50aa6360f0dc9c8ded9086b94e": [
        "g.log:index.js:31"
      ],
      "b5d4af08bf61e58d375923977290d67b": [
        "g.log:index.js:29"
      ],
      "%s Hello %s": [
        "util.format:index.js:20"
      ],
      "http://localhost:": [
        "request:index.js:35"
      ]
    }
    

    and, intl/zz/messages_inverted.json:

    {
      "index.js": {
        "20": [
          "util.format('%s Hello %s', ... )"
        ],
        "29": [
          "g.log('b5d4af08bf61e58d375923977290d67b')"
        ],
        "31": [
          "g.log('77decb50aa6360f0dc9c8ded9086b94e')"
        ],
        "35": [
          "request('http://localhost:')"
        ]
      }
    }
    

    Persistent logging

    strong-globalize provides 'persistent logging' by passing all the localized messages as well as the original English messages to client-supplied callback function.

    SG.SetPersistentLogging(logCallback, disableConsole)

    logCallback is called when a user message is sent to stdout or stderr to show to the user. Two arguments passed to logCallback are: level (string) and msg (object) which has three properties: message (UTF8 string) which is the localized message shown to the user, orig (UTF8 string) the corresponding original English message with placeholder(s), and vars (an array of argument(s) for the placeholder(s)).

    {
      language: 'ja',
      message: 'ホスト:localhostのポート:8123へ送っています。',
      orig: 'Sending to host: %s, port: %d ...',
      vars: ['localhost', 8123],
    }

    disableConsole (default: false) is a boolean to specify whether to send the messsage to stdout or stderr. disableConsole should be set to true in case the client controls the user communication. For example, if the client uses winston file transport for logging, the client code would look like this:

    Client:

    const SG = require('strong-globalize');
    SG.SetRootDir(__dirname);
    SG.SetDefaultLanguage();
    const g = new SG(); // strong-globalize handle
    const w = require('winston'); // winston handle
    initWinston(w);
    // let strong-globalize to show it to the user
    const disableConsole = false;
    SG.SetPersistentLogging(w.log, disableConsole);
     
    function initWinston(w) {
      const options = {
        filename: __dirname + '/system.log',
        maxsize: 1000000,
        maxFiles: 10,
        zippedArchive: true,
      };
      w.add(w.transports.File, options);
      // let strong-globalize to show it to the user
      w.remove(w.transports.Console);
    }

    Persistent logging demo gmain/index.js

    const express = require('express');
    const request = require('request');
    const app = express();
    const SG = require('strong-globalize');
    SG.SetRootDir(__dirname);
    const gsub = require('gsub');
    const w = require('winston'); // winston handle
     
    const g = new SG(); // strong-globalize handle
    initWinston(w); // see the Client initialization
    const disableConsole = false;
    SG.SetPersistentLogging(w.log, disableConsole);
     
    app.get('/', function(req, res) {
      const helloMessage = g.f('%s Hello World', g.d(new Date()));
      w.info(helloMessage); // write only to the log file with 'info' level
      res.end(helloMessage);
    });
     
    const port = process.env.PORT || 8123;
    app.listen(port, function() {
      g.log('Listening on %s by %s.', port, gsub.getUserName());
    });
     
    setInterval(function(){
      g.owrite('Sending request to %s ...', port);
      request('http://localhost:' + port,
        function(error, response, body) {console.log(body);});
    },1000);
     
    g.info(gsub.getHelpText()); // write to both console and the log file with 'info' level

    Note: w.info(helloMessage) directly calls the winston API info and write helpMessage to the log file. g.info(gsub.getHelpText()) writes the localized help text to both console and the log file with info level. The other strong-globalize API calls, i.e., g.log and g.owrite also write the localized message to both console and the log file with info level.

    Other resources

    API - Set system defaults

    const SG = require('strong-globalize);

    SG.SetRootDir(rootPath, options)

    • rootPath : {string} App's root directory full path. Every client must set its root directory where package.json and intl directory exist. All resources under this directory including dependent modules are loaded in runtime. SetRootDir must be called once and only once usually in the main js module.
    • options : {autonomousMsgLoading: ['none' | 'all' | <an array of strings]} (optional) 'none' (default) -- load string resources at the master rootDir, but not load from dependency packages 'all' -- load string resources from all packages <an array of package name strings> -- load string resources at the master rootDir and the specified packages if the master package depends on them.

    SG.SetDefaultLanguage(lang)

    • lang : {string} (optional) Language ID such as de, en, es, fr, it, ja, ko, pt, ru, zh-Hans, and zh-Hant. If omitted, strong-globalize tries to use the OS language, then falls back to 'en' It must be called at least once. By default, it's called in SetRootDir, so it can be omitted completely. Can be called multiple times.

    strong-globalize uses the language code in a form of a combination of ISO 639-1 language code and ISO 15924 script code such as zh-Hans for Chinese - Han (Simplified variant).

    SG.SetHtmlRegex(regex, regexHead, regexTail)

    • regex : {RegExp} to extract the whole string out of the HTML text
    • regexHead : {RegExp} to trim the head portion from the extracted string
    • regexTail : {RegExp} to trim the tail portion from the extracted string

    Most clients do not need to setHtmlRegex. See the Globalize HTML Templates section for details.

    g.setLanguage(lang)

    • lang : {string} (optional) Language ID such as de, en, es, fr, it, ja, ko, pt, ru, zh-Hans, and zh-Hant. If omitted, strong-globalize tries to use the OS language, then falls back to 'en' It must be called at least once. Can be called multiple times.

    g.getLanguage()

    • returns {string} Language ID such as de, en, es, fr, it, ja, ko, pt, ru, zh-Hans, and zh-Hant.

    API - Formatters

    const g = new SG({language: 'en'});

    g.formatMessage(path, variables)

    • path {string} The message key
    • variables {object} (optional, default: null) List of placeholder key and content value pair

    g.t(path, variables)

    alias of formatMessage

    g.m(path, variables)

    alias of formatMessage

    g.formatCurrency(value, currencySymbol, options)

    • value {number} integer or float
    • currencySymbol {string} ISO 4217 three-letter currency code such as 'USD' for US Dollars
    • options {object} (optional) jquery/globalize option format. If omitted, StrongLoop default is used.

    g.c(value, currencySymbol, options)

    alias of formatCurrency

    g.formatDate(value, options)

    • value {Date object} Date
    • options {object} (optional) jquery/globalize option format. If omitted, StrongLoop default is used.

    g.d(value, options)

    alias of formatDate

    g.formatNumber(value, options)

    • value {number} integer or float
    • options {object} (optional) jquery/globalize option format. If omitted, StrongLoop default is used.

    g.n(value, options)

    alias of formatNumber

    API - Wrappers

    %s place holders are supported. Intended to directly globalize strings embedded in the first parameter of Error, console.error, console.log, etc. and util.format by simply replacing console or util with require('strong-globalize'). 'path' is the literal string. 'path' cannot be a variable. If a variable is used as path the off-line extraction won't be able to extract because string data assigned to a variable is known only in runtime.

    g.Error(path, ...)(capital Error)

    returns Error with a formatted message.

    g.format(path, ...)

    returns the result message from formatMessage. intended to replace util.format.

    g.f(path, ...)

    alias of format

    g.ewrite(path, ...)

    passes the result message from formatMessage to process.stderr.write, and log to file with error level if persistent logging is set.

    g.owrite(path, ...)

    passes the result message from formatMessage to process.stdout.write, and log to file with info level if persistent logging is set.

    g.write(path, ...)

    alias of owrite

    Wrappers for RFC 5424 Syslog Message Severities

    g.emergency(path, ...)

    passes the result message from formatMessage to console.error, and log to file with emergency level if persistent logging is set.

    g.alert(path, ...)

    passes the result message from formatMessage to console.error, and log to file with alert level if persistent logging is set.

    g.critical(path, ...)

    passes the result message from formatMessage to console.error, and log to file with critical level if persistent logging is set.

    g.error(path, ...)(small error)

    passes the result message from formatMessage to console.error, and log to file with error level if persistent logging is set.

    g.warning(path, ...)

    passes the result message from formatMessage to console.error, and log to file with warning level if persistent logging is set.

    g.notice(path, ...)

    passes the result message from formatMessage to console.log, and log to file with notice level if persistent logging is set.

    g.informational(path, ...)

    passes the result message from formatMessage to console.log, and log to file with informational level if persistent logging is set.

    g.debug(path, ...)

    passes the result message from formatMessage to console.log, and log to file with debug level if persistent logging is set.

    Wrappers for Node.js Console

    g.warn(path, ...)

    passes the result message from formatMessage to console.error, and log to file with warn level if persistent logging is set.

    g.info(path, ...)

    passes the result message from formatMessage to console.log, and log to file with info level if persistent logging is set.

    g.log(path, ...)

    passes the result message from formatMessage to console.log, and log to file with log level if persistent logging is set.

    Wrappers for Misc Logging Levels

    g.help(path, ...)

    passes the result message from formatMessage to console.log, and log to file with help level if persistent logging is set.

    g.data(path, ...)

    passes the result message from formatMessage to console.log, and log to file with data level if persistent logging is set.

    g.prompt(path, ...)

    passes the result message from formatMessage to console.log, and log to file with prompt level if persistent logging is set.

    g.verbose(path, ...)

    passes the result message from formatMessage to console.log, and log to file with verbose level if persistent logging is set.

    g.input(path, ...)

    passes the result message from formatMessage to console.log, and log to file with input level if persistent logging is set.

    g.silly(path, ...)

    passes the result message from formatMessage to console.log, and log to file with silly level if persistent logging is set.

    Usage examples

    Rule of thumb for auto-extraction with slt-globalize -e:

    • String literals defined as the first argument (path) of the APIs is extracted.
    • String literals concatenated with '+' in the first argument are extracted as a single message.

    use g.f for util.format

    before:

    Error(util.format('Directory %s does not exist', workingDir));

    after:

    Error(g.f('Directory %s does not exist', workingDir));

    or

    g.Error('Directory %s does not exist', workingDir);

    use g.write for process.stdout.write

    before globalization:

    // don't concatenate string. word order varies from language to language.
    process.stdout.write('Directory ' + workingDir + ' does not exist...');

    wrong globalization: (don't concatenate words; word order varies from language to language)

    process.stdout.write(g.t('Directory ') + workingDir + g.t(' does not exist...'));

    right globalization:

    g.write('Directory %s does not exist...', workingDir);

    place holders

    You can use place holders and parameters in one of these four ways if you'd like:

    before globalization:

    util.format('Deploy %s to %s failed: %s', what, url, err);

    right globalization (4 ways)

    // 1 (recommended; simply replace `util` with `g`)
    g.f('Deploy %s to %s failed: %s', what, url, err);
    // 2
    g.f('Deploy {0} to {1} failed: {2}', [what, url, err]);
    // 3
    g.f('Deploy {0} to {1} failed: {2}', {0: what, 1: url, 2: err});
    // 4
    g.f('Deploy {what} to {url} failed: {err}', {what: what, url: url, err: err});

    When you put placeholders in help txt and msg messages, named or ordered placeholders should be used. Named placeholder is something like {userName}. Ordered placeholder is {0}, {1}, {2}, etc. which should be zero-base.

    Curly brace characters are reserved by strong-globalize. In case curly brace characters are used in literal strings, escape them. For example, {User} is a placeholder and '\x7bUser\x7d' is an escaped literal string rendered as '{User}'

    double curly braces not to translate

    Use double curly braces {{ }} as "don't translate" indicator.

    before globalization:

    console.error('Invalid usage (near option \'%s\'), try `%s --help`.', option, cmd);

    right globalization:

    g.error('Invalid usage (near option \'%s\'), try {{`%s --help`}}.', option, cmd);

    help txt files

    before globalization:

    const help = fs.readFileSync(require.resolve('./help.txt'), 'utf-8');

    right globalization:

    const help = g.t('help.txt'); // or g.f('help.txt');

    and store help.txt file under intl/en.

    help txt files and msg keys

    They must be uniquely named because they are used as-is in runtime message database where the messages come from other modules will be merged. In case there are duplicate .txt or msg, it could be overwritten by other module(s) with the same name whichever is loaded later. Best practice is to use your package name as part of the name. For example, msgMyPackage_ErrorMessage.

    The rule of thumb is strong-globalize extracts messages from JS and HTML template files and creates the messages.json file (or appends extracted messages to the messages.json if it exists), but does not edit the help txt files, msg messages, or JS/HTML files provided by the client.

    Note that strong-globalize supports multiple txt and multiple json files under intl/--/ directory.

    manually add message strings

    slt-globalize -e command extracts message strings from your source JS files and HTML templates. In case translation is needed for strings which are not in the source files, you can manually add them to the resource JSON files. To manually add message strings to the resource file, use a key that begins with msg such as msgPortNumber. Those keys are kept intact in auto-extraction and the value text will be properly translated.

    Demo

    To quickly switch the locale, change the OS's system locale or set STRONGLOOP_GLOBALIZE_APP_LANGUAGE environment variable to one of the supported languages such as ja for Japanese or de for German.

    For example, on OSX:

    cd gmain
    LANG=ja node index.js

    gsub/index.js

    before:

    const fs = require('fs');
    const util = require('util');
     
    exports.getHelpText = getHelpText;
    exports.getUserName = getUserName;
     
    function getUserName() {
      const userName = util.format('user: %s', process.env.USER);
      return userName;
    }
     
    function getHelpText() {
      const helpText = fs.readFileSync(require.resolve('./gsub.txt'), 'utf-8');
      return helpText;
    }

    after:

    • const g = require('strong-globalize')();
    • replace util with g
    • replace readFile *.txt with simply g.t and move ./gsub.txt to ./intl/en/gsub.txt
    • then, run slt-globalize -e to extract and slt-globalize -t to machine translate the string resource.
    const g = require('strong-globalize')();
     
    exports.getHelpText = getHelpText;
    exports.getUserName = getUserName;
     
    function getUserName() {
      const userName = g.f('user: %s', process.env.USER);
      return userName;
    }
     
    function getHelpText() {
      return g.t('gsub.txt');
    }

    gmain/index.js

    before:

    const express = require('express');
    const request = require('request');
    const app = express();
    const util = require('util');
    const gsub = require('gsub');
     
    app.get('/', function(req, res) {
      const helloMessage = util.format('%s Hello World', new Date());
      res.end(helloMessage);
    });
     
    const port = process.env.PORT || 8123;
    app.listen(port, function() {
      console.log('Listening on %s by %s.', port, gsub.getUserName());
    });
     
    setInterval(function(){
        process.stdout.write('Sending request to ' + port + '...');
        request('http://localhost:' + port,
            function(error, response, body) {console.log(body);});
    },1000);
     
    console.log(gsub.getHelpText());

    after:

    • const SG = require('strong-globalize');
    • SG.SetRootDir( ... );
    • const g = new SG();
    • replace util with g
    • replace console with g
    • replace process.stdout with g
    • wrap new Date() with g.d()
    • then, run slt-globalize -e to extract and slt-globalize -t to machine translate the string resource.
    const SG = require('strong-globalize');
    SG.SetRootDir(__dirname);
     
    const express = require('express');
    const request = require('request');
    const app = express();
    const gsub = require('gsub');
     
    const g = new SG();
     
    app.get('/', function(req, res) {
      const helloMessage = g.f('%s Hello World', g.d(new Date()));
      res.end(helloMessage);
    });
     
    const port = process.env.PORT || 8123;
    app.listen(port, function() {
      g.log('Listening on %s by %s.', port, gsub.getUserName());
    });
     
    setInterval(function(){
        g.owrite('Sending request to %s ...', port);
        request('http://localhost:' + port,
            function(error, response, body) {console.log(body);});
    },1000);
     
    console.log(gsub.getHelpText());

    Sample code

    Sample code is included under examples directory. Let's browse the code and quickly study the standard coding pattern of strong-globalize.

    examples
    ├── gmain
    │   ├── index.js
    │   ├── intl
    │   │   ├── en
    │   │   │   └── messages.json
    │   │   └── zz
    │   │       ├── messages.json
    │   │       └── messages_inverted.json
    │   └── package.json
    └── gsub
        ├── index.js
        ├── intl
        │   ├── en
        │   │   ├── help.txt
        │   │   └── messages.json
        │   └── zz
        │       ├── messages.json
        │       └── messages_inverted.json
        ├── lib
        │   └── util.js
        └── package.json
    

    First argument

    strong-globalize extracts literal strings passed as the first argument of the strong-globalize functions. In globalizing existing modules, most code changes you are going to make will be to make sure all literal strings are in that form. Usually, you do not need to globalize debug text.

    Three types of modules

    From strong-globalize point of view, the role of every JS file is one of the three types:

    a. master main -- SetRootDir(__dirname) is declared right after require('strong-globalize') which is placed at the very first line of the main JS module of the root package in the application. See examples/gmain/index.js. SG.SetDefaultLanguage(); is optional if the lang parameter is omitted or 'en' (English) is used as the default language.

    b. main -- The main JS module of all the other packages in the application must call SetRootDir(__dirname) in the first line of the main JS module of all the other (non-root) packages. See examples/gsub/index.js.

    c. sub -- All the other JS modules that call the strong-globalize function require strong-globalize as const g = require('strong-globalize')(); See examples/gsub/lib/util.jsIn case you need multiplestrong-globalize` instances, do the following:

    const SG = require('strong-globalize');
    const gFrench = new SG('fr');
    const gSpanish = new SG('es');
    // parallel use
    gFrench.log('text in French');
    gSpanish.log('text in Spanish');
    gFrench.log('second text in French');

    You can also re-use one instance multiple times as follows:

    const g = require('strong-globalize')();
    g.setLanguage('fr');
    g.log('text in French');
    g.setLanguage('es');
    g.log('text in Spanish');
    g.setLanguage('fr');
    g.log('second text in French');

    License

    Artistic License 2.0

    Install

    npm i strong-globalize

    DownloadsWeekly Downloads

    208,000

    Version

    6.0.5

    License

    Artistic-2.0

    Unpacked Size

    3.04 MB

    Total Files

    51

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