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stateful-context

2.0.1 • Public • Published

StatefulContext

A stateful context to DRY up your promise chain.

Often times, especially in specs, there are times that you have to deal with multiple values in a promise chain.

A Gentle Example

Let's say you are building a Twitter-like application and want to test that following works, that is, when A follows B and B updates a status, A should see B's status in the timeline.

One approach is to nest these promises, resulting in a promise hell instead of a callback hell.

Promise.all([createUser('foo'), createUser('bar')])
.then(function([user1, user2]) {
  return user1.follow(user2)
  .then(function() {
    return user2.updateStatus('My status')
  })
  .then(function(status) {
    return user1.getTimeline()
    .then(function(timeline) {
      expectTimelineToContainStatus(timeline, status)
      done()
    })
  })
})

Another approach is to pass all the variables we need in the future steps through the promise chain. Notice how you have to maintain the correct order of values and parameters in each step.

Promise.all([createUser('foo'), createUser('bar')])
.then(function([user1, user2]) {
  return user1.follow(user2)
    .then(function() { return [user1, user2] })
})
.then(function([user1, user2]) {
  return user2.updateStatus('My status')
    .then(function(status) { return [user1, status] })
})
.then(function([user1, status]) {
  return [user1.getTimeline(), status]
})
.then(function([timeline, status]) {
  expectTimelineToContainStatus(timeline, status)
  done()
})

And yet another approach is to just store these variables as local variables. Notice how you have to create multiple variables and assigning them yourself.

var user1, user2, status
Promise.all([createUser('foo'), createUser('bar')])
.then(function([_user1, _user2]) {
  user1 = _user1
  user2 = _user2
  return user1.follow(user2)
})
.then(function() {
  return user2.updateStatus('My status')
})
.then(function(_status) {
  status = _status
  return user1.getTimeline()
})
.then(function(timeline) {
  expectTimelineToContainStatus(timeline, status)
  done()
})

With a StatefulContext, this becomes:

set({
  firstUser: createUser('foo'),
  secondUser: createUser('foo'),
})
.then(function() {
  return the.firstUser.follow(the.secondUser)
})
.then(function() {
  return set({ status: the.secondUser.updateStatus('My status') })
})
.then(function() {
  return set({ timeline: the.firstUser.getTimeline() })
})
.then(function() {
  expectTimelineToContainStatus(the.timeline, the.status)
  done()
})

And this StatefulContext is implemented using 8 lines of code.

Usage

var StatefulContext = require('stateful-context')
var the = new StatefulContext(), set = the.set

Use it in your mocha tests

var StatefulContext = require('stateful-context')
beforeEach(function() {
  global.the = new StatefulContext()
  global.set = global.the.set
})

More descriptive name, please

You might think that the name the and set are not quite descriptive. You can also name it like this:

beforeEach(function() {
  global.locals = new StatefulContext()
})

And the above example becomes:

locals.set({
  firstUser: createUser('foo'),
  secondUser: createUser('foo'),
})
.then(function() {
  return locals.firstUser.follow(locals.secondUser)
})
.then(function() {
  return locals.set({ status: locals.secondUser.updateStatus('My status') })
})
.then(function() {
  return locals.set({ timeline: locals.firstUser.getTimeline() })
})
.then(function() {
  expectTimelineToContainStatus(locals.timeline, locals.status)
  done()
})

API

StatefulContext.set(context, object)

Returns a promise that will resolve when all promises inside the object are resolved. Also, the resolved values are added the context with corresponding key as a side effect.

If any of the promise in the object is rejected, the returned promise will be rejected.

context = new StatefulContext()

Returns a new StatefulContext object.

var the = new StatefulContext()

This object has a .set method on it, already bound to the created StatefulContext instance. Therefore, you can store that function in a variable and call it without having to worry about the value of this.

context.set(object)

Equivalent to calling StatefulContext.set(context, object).

Warning: Don't call set with an object with a key called set! :)

Keywords

Install

npm i stateful-context

DownloadsWeekly Downloads

4

Version

2.0.1

License

MIT

Last publish

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