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    statefool

    1.0.2 • Public • Published

    StateFool

    The most easiest State-Managment package for React.

    From Now on, working with global states is a piece of cake! Because I dislike working with Redux like many of you, I decided to write a very simple yet comprehensive package with just a few lines of code, so that we can easily manage the global states.

    No extraordinary things has been used in this package. only createContext and useState from React has been used.

    Installation

    npm i --save statefool
    

    Guide

    1- Provider

    First, we import a Provider from the statefool package.

    import {Provider} from 'statefool';

    Each Provider should embrace components that use the states of this Provider.

    <Provider id="user" initialState={{ name: 'Hannan', family:'Std' }}>
      <TestComponent1/>
      <TestComponent2/>
    </Provider>

    In the above example, the TestComponent1 and TestComponent2 components, which are completely independent of each other, are commonly supposed to use the state related to the user, and one of them will change name and the other one will change family of the user.

    We have considered a mandatory id for this Provider, so that we can later access the states of that Provider by calling the same id.

    We can have many different Providers for different tasks. because I want to edit user information here, so I set id="user". For example, I may want to have an other Provider later for the shopping cart, then I will put its id="cart".

    Providers can both be used in parallel with each other and can be used inside each other, and we have not any limitations.

    We also enter the initial value of our state inside initialState like we did in the Class-Components.

    Of course, if you do not have the patience to type initialState, just type the state instead of initialState :)

    2- Consumer

    import {Consumer} from 'statefool';

    Now suppose that, inside the TestComponent1 or the TestComponent2, whether they are Class-Component type or Functional-Component type, we want to access state and setState related to the user, we need to call the id related to the user inside jsx using the Consumer.

    <Consumer id="user">
      {user => (
        <>
          <span>{user.name} {user.family}</span>
          <button onClick={() => user.setState({ name: 'John' })}>
            Change Name to John
          </button>
        </>
      )}
    </Consumer>

    setState:

    Interestingly, the setState method is exactly like the React setState. That is, we can pass either an Object or a function that contains a previous state. See the following examples:

    user.setState({ name: 'John' })
    user.setState(prevState => ({ name: 'MR ' + prevState.name }))

    Like the React setState, we can pass a callback function as a second argument, aslo with the advantage, we can access to the updated state in Callback:

    user.setState({ name: 'John' }, newState => alert('Hello:' + newState.name) )

    I can say that all things are almost finished. Easy Easy Finish Finish!

    I put code of the above discussion in more detail below. But if you are looking for something more interesting, go ahead the instruction.

    //App.js
    import React, { Component } from 'react';
    import { render } from 'react-dom';
    import { Provider } from 'statefool';
    import TestComponent1 from './TestComponent1';
    import TestComponent2 from './TestComponent2';
     
    export default class App extends Component {
      render() {
        return (
          <Provider id="user" initialState={{ name: 'Hannan', family:'Std' }}>
            <TestComponent1 />
            <TestComponent2 />
          </Provider>
        );
      }
    }
     
    render(<App />, document.getElementById('root'));
    // TestComponent1.js -> Class-Component
    export default class  TestComponent1 extends React.Component {
      render() {
        return (
          <Consumer id="user">
            {user => (
              <>
                <span>{user.name} {user.family}</span>
                <button onClick={() => user.setState({ name: 'John' })}>
                  Change Name to John
                </button>
              </>
            )}
          </Consumer>
        );
      }
    }
    //TestComponent2.js -> Functional-Component
    const TestComponent2 = (props) => {
      return (
        <Consumer id="user">
          {user => (
            <>
              <span>{user.name} {user.family}</span>
              <button onClick={() => user.setState({ family: 'Doe' })}>
                Change Family to Doe
              </button>
            </>
          )}
        </Consumer>
      );
    }
    export default TestComponent2;

    As I mentioned above, the things are well done in two topics of Provider and Consumer, but we'll explain the more advanced part.

    3- Use as a Hook

    For use in Functional-Components, in addition to the Consumer, there is another option as useStateFrom that looks like useState of the React, except that its arguments are different. Since we set the initial values in the Provider, we will not apply the initial value here. we use it as follows:

    useStateFrom(ProviderID, stateName?);
     
    const [name, setName]     = useStateFrom('user', 'name');
    const [family, setFamily] = useStateFrom('user', 'family');

    Examples of setting the state:

    setName('John');
    setFamily('Doe');
    setName(prevName=> 'MR ' + prevName);

    But what happens if we don't pass the second parameter, i.e. stateName? Just the way of usage becomes as follows:

    const {name, family, setState} = useStateFrom('user');
    console.log(name, family);
    setState({name:'John'});

    4- withState

    Do you know what the problem is with the use of Consumer? The answer is that we use it in render or, in other words, in jsx. And what if we want to use it outside the render or jsx? The hook mentioned above can simply be used for Functional-Components. But what about the Class-Components? Well, we can here do this easily using the withState. Note the following example:

    import React from 'react';
    import {withState} from 'statefool';
     
    class Test extends React.Component {
      componentDidMount() {
        const { user } = this.props;
        console.log(user.name, user.family);
        user.setState({ name: 'John' }, ()=> alert('Yes, State is easy peasy'));
      }
     
      render() {
        const { user } = this.props;
        return (<span>Hey, {user.name + ' ' + user.family}</span>);
      }
    }
    export default withState(Test, ['user']);

    We pass the component to the withState as the first parameter. In the second parameter, we pass an array of the ids of Providers, e.g. ['user', 'cart', etc.] that we want to access them in the class by this.props.

    However, this withState is not only dedicated to the Class-Components and can also be used for Functional-Components. But when there is a Hook, why HOC to be used? :)

    Finish!

    Install

    npm i statefool

    DownloadsWeekly Downloads

    1

    Version

    1.0.2

    License

    ISC

    Unpacked Size

    15.9 kB

    Total Files

    5

    Last publish

    Collaborators

    • hannanstd