starsky

A higher level and opinionated library on top of node-amqp.

Starsky

Starsky is a high-level, opinionated node module for writing services that consume messages from RabbitMQ. It's modeled directly after the elegant approach taken by the Ruby library, Hutch. The opinions baked into the module are the same as Hutch's:

  • topic exchanges
  • durable queues & exchanges
  • persistant messages
  • publisher confirms

With npm:

$ npm install starsky

To connect, invoke starsky.connect. The callback will be invoked once the connection to RabbitMQ has been established and the underlying exchange as been created and/or opened.

var starsky = require('starsky');
 
starsky.connect(callback);

To disconnect, invoke starsky.disconnect. The callback will be called once any in-flight messages have been processed and/or published.

var starsky = require('starsky');
 
starsky.disconnect(callback);

To configure programatically, invoke starsky.set with the configuration option name and value:

var starsky = require('starsky');
 
starsky.set('mq host', 'localhost');
starsky.set('mq port', 5672);
starsky.set('exchange', 'demo');

If configuration objects are more your style, just pass them all in at once.

var starsky = require('starsky');
 
starsky.set({
  'mq host': 'localhost',
  'mq port': 5672,
  'exchange': 'demo'
});

The configuration options:

  • mq exchange -- The topic exchange name to be created. Defaults to starsky
  • mq host -- The rabbitmq host. Defaults to localhost
  • mq port -- The rabbitmq port. Defaults to 5672
  • mq vhost -- The rabbitmq vhost. Defaults to /
  • mq username -- The rabbitmq username. Defaults to guest
  • mq password -- The rabbitmq password. Defaults to guest
  • mq tls -- Whether rabbitmq requires a secure connection. Defaults to false.
  • mq tls cert -- The rabbitmq tls cert file path, if tls is set to true.
  • mq tls key -- The rabbitmq tls key file path, if tls is set to true.
  • namespace -- A prefix to prepend to queue names. Defaults to undefined

To publish a message, invoke starsky.publish with a topic, message and callback. The callback will be used for the message confirmation. If the underlying connection has not been established when publishing a message, an error will bubble up to the callback.

var starsky = require('starsky');
 
starsky.set('mq host', 'localhost');
starsky.set('mq port', 5672);
starsky.set('exchange', 'demo');
 
setInterval(function () {
  starsky.publish('log.info', {
    hello: 'world'
  }, confirm);
}, 1000);
 
function confirm (err) {
  if (err) console.error(err.message);
}
 
starsky.connect();

To create a consumer, invoke starsky.consumer. The name should be whatever you want the name of the queue to be inside RabbitMQ. Note that if you have a prefix option set, that will be prefixed to the name when the queue is created.

var starsky = require('starsky');
 
var consumer = starsky.consumer('log');
 
starsky.set('mq host', 'localhost');
starsky.set('mq port', 5672);
starsky.set('exchange', 'demo');
 
starsky.once('connect', function () {
  consumer.subscribe('log.info');
  consumer.process(function (msgdone) {
    console.log('id: %s', msg.id);
    console.log('body: %j', msg.body);
    console.log('timestamp: %s', msg.timestamp);
    console.log('topic: %s', msg.topic);
    done();
  });
});
 
starsky.connect();

To subscribe to a topic, invoke consumer.subscribe. This will setup the necessary queue bindings with RabbitMQ. You must setup all your subscriptions prior to processing messages.

consumer.subscribe('log.info');
consumer.subscribe('log.#');
consumer.subscribe('log.*');

To start processing message, invoke consumer.process. This will invoke the function for each message routed to the queue. There are two arguments passed to the function: msg and done. The msg is an object with the following properties:

  • id: A unique identifer for the message.
  • body: The actual message published.
  • timestamp: The time when the message was published.
  • topic: The topic the message was published with.
consumer.process(function (msgdone) {
  console.log('id: %s', msg.id);
  console.log('body: %j', msg.body);
  console.log('timestamp: %s', msg.timestamp);
  console.log('topic: %s', msg.topic);
  done();
});

The done function is a callback that should be invoked when all the work that needs to be accomplished is finished. If an error occurs that requires the message to be re-tried, pass the error as the first argument. This will direct the message to be rejected.

To control the amount of messages the consumer can accept, invoke consumer.prefetch method. By default it only accepts 1 message at a time. If you want to turn on the "firehose", meaning accept all the messages as they are published, use 0.

consumer.prefetch(10);

Installing

$ make

Running tests

$ make test

Code Coverage (requires jscoverage)

$ make lib-cov

MIT