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socket.io-kafka

socket.io-kafka

How to use

var io = require('socket.io')(3000);
var kafka = require('socket.io-kafka');
io.adapter(kafka('localhost:2181'));

By running socket.io with socket.io-kafka you can scale your socket.io app horizontally using multiple ports or servers.

This adapter aims to be an alternative to the socket.io-redis adapter which allow multiple socket.io instances to communicate using Kafka instead of Redis.

Why Kafka?

Kafka is a very fast, scalable, distributed message bus and was designed to handle a huge amount of data with low latency. It was originally developed by LinkedIn and is currently part of the Apache Project.

As Kafka provides built-in partitioning, replication, and fault-tolerance, it feels like a natural choice to build scalable socket.io applications with high throughput or which will require a great number of instances talking amongst themselves.

API

adapter(uri[, opts])

uri is a zookeper connection string like localhost:2821 where your zookeeper cluster is located.

The adapater uses the kafka-node and accepts a comma separated host:port pairs, each represents a zookeeper server.

For a list of options see below.

adapter(opts)

The following options are allowed:

  • key: the name of the key prefix the kafka topic (socket.io)
  • host: zookeeper host
  • port: zookeeper port
  • uri: substitute for host and port, zookeeper connection string
  • consumer: optional, a kafka.Consumer instance
  • producer: optional, a kafka.Producer instance
  • createTopics: optional, if we should try to create a new Kafka topic (true)
  • partition: partition to read and write to (0)

Running tests

npm test will run jasmine with istanbul code coverage. The command expects the modules to be installed as global.

TODO

  • add CI (crrently code is linted, tested and coverage is above 85%)
  • read from multiple partitions
  • allow configuration to set consumer options
  • allow configuration to set compression (currently snappy is hardcoded)
  • benchmark (find out real world limits)

License

MIT