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service-worker-router

1.7.5 • Public • Published

service-worker-router

An elegant and fast URL router for service workers (and standalone use)

Yet another router? 😄

I was unable to find a modern router with the following features:

  • Framework agnostic and service worker support
    • Most routers are intertwined with a specific web server or framework, this one is agnostic and can be used everywhere (Node.js, browsers, workers). See the standalone example.
    • The router is used in production with Cloudflare Workers.
  • TypeScript (and JavaScript) support
    • Even when not using TypeScript there's the benefit of better code editor tooling (improved IntelliSense) for the developer.
  • Match the path or the full URL
    • Most routers only support matching a /path, with service workers it's sometimes necessary to use the full URL as well.
  • Elegant pattern matching
    • Life's too short to debug regexes. :-)
  • Also: Lightweight (8KB, ~100 LOC), tested, supports tree shaking and ES modules

Installation

yarn add service-worker-router
# or 
npm install --save service-worker-router

Usage

// TypeScript
import { Router, HandlerContext } from 'service-worker-router'
 
// Modern JavaScript, Babel, Webpack, Rollup, etc.
import { Router } from 'service-worker-router'
 
// Legacy JavaScript and Node.js
const { Router } = require('service-worker-router')
 
// Inside a web/service worker
importScripts('https://unpkg.com/service-worker-router')
const Router = self.ServiceWorkerRouter.Router
 
// HTML: Using ES modules
<script type="module">
  import { Router } from 'https://unpkg.com/service-worker-router/dist/router.browser.mjs';
</script>
 
// HTML: Oldschool
<script src="https://unpkg.com/service-worker-router"></script>
var Router = window.ServiceWorkerRouter.Router

URL polyfill

The router is making use of the WHATWG URL object. If your environment is Node < v8 or IE (see compat) you need to polyfill it before requiring/importing the router. By using polyfill.io the shim will only be loaded if the browser needs it.

// Add URL polyfill in Node.js < 8
// npm i --save universal-url
require('universal-url').shim()
 
// Add URL polyfill in workers
importScripts('https://cdn.polyfill.io/v2/polyfill.min.js?features=URL')
 
// Add URL polyfill in HTML scripts
<script src="https://cdn.polyfill.io/v2/polyfill.min.js?features=URL"></script>

Example (service worker)

JavaScript

// Instantiate a new router
const router = new Router()
 
// Define user handler
const user = async ({ request, params }) => {
  const headers = new Headers({ 'x-user-id': params.id })
  const response = new Response(`Hello user with id ${params.id}.`, { headers })
  return response
}
 
// Define minimal ping handler
const ping = async () => new Response('pong')
 
// Define routes and their handlers
router.get('/user/:id', user)
router.all('/_ping', ping)
 
// Set up service worker event listener
addEventListener('fetch', event => {
  // Will test event.request against the defined routes
  // and use event.respondWith(handler) when a route matches
  router.handleEvent(event)
})

TypeScript

Same as the above but with optional types:

// Add 'webworker' to the lib property in your tsconfig.json
// also: https://github.com/Microsoft/TypeScript/issues/14877
declare const self: ServiceWorkerGlobalScope
 
// Instantiate a new router
const router = new Router()
 
// Define user handler
const user = async ({ request, params }: HandlerContext): Promise<Response> => {
  const headers = new Headers({ 'x-user-id': params.id })
  const response = new Response(`Hello user with id ${params.id}.`, { headers })
  return response
}
 
// Define minimal ping handler
const ping = async () => new Response('pong')
 
// Define routes and their handlers
router.get('/user/:id', user)
router.all('/_ping', ping)
 
// Set up service worker event listener
// To resolve 'FetchEvent' add 'webworker' to the lib property in your tsconfig.json
self.addEventListener('fetch', (event: FetchEvent) => {
  // Will test event.request against the defined routes
  // and use event.respondWith(handler) when a route matches
  router.handleEvent(event)
})

Example (standalone)

This router can be used on it's own using router.match, service worker usage is optional.

const router = new Router()
 
const user = async () => `Hey there!`
router.get('/user/:name', user)
 
router.match('/user/bob', 'GET')
// => { params: { name: 'bob' }, handler: [AsyncFunction: user],  url...

Patterns

The router is using the excellent url-pattern module (it's sole dependency).

Patterns can have optional segments and wildcards.

A route pattern can be a string or a UrlPattern instance, for greater flexibility and optional regex support.

Examples

// will match everything
router.all('*', handler)
 
// `id` value will be available in `params` in handler
router.all('/api/users/:id', handler)
 
// will only match exact path
router.all('/api/foo/', handler)
 
// will match longer paths as well
router.all('/api/foo/*', handler)
 
// will match with wildcard in between
router.all('/admin/*/user/*/tail', handler)
 
// use UrlPattern instance
router.all(new UrlPattern('/api/posts(/:id)'), handler)

URL matching

By default the router will only match against the /path of a URL. To test against a full URL just add { matchUrl: true } when adding a route.

Examples

// test against full url, not only path
router.post('(http(s)\\://)api.example.com/users(/:id)', handler, {
  matchUrl: true
})
 
// test against full url and extract segments
router.get('(http(s)\\://)(:subdomain.):domain.:tld(/*)', handler, {
  matchUrl: true
})
 
router.match('http://mail.google.com/mail', 'GET')
// => { params: {subdomain: 'mail', domain: 'google', tld: 'com', _: 'mail'}, handler: [AsyncFunction], ...

Refer to the url-pattern documentation and it's tests for more information and examples regarding pattern matching.

HTTP methods

To add a route, simply use one of the following methods. router.all will match any HTTP method.

  • router.all(pattern, handler, options)
  • router.get(pattern, handler, options)
  • router.post(pattern, handler, options)
  • router.put(pattern, handler, options)
  • router.patch(pattern, handler, options)
  • router.delete(pattern, handler, options)
  • router.head(pattern, handler, options)
  • router.options(pattern, handler, options)

The function signature is as follows:

pattern: string | UrlPattern
handler: HandlerFunction
options: RouteOptions = {}

The RouteOptions object is optional and can contain { matchUrl: boolean }.

All methods will return the router instance, for optional chaining.

Handler function

The handler function for a route is expected to be an async function (or Promise).

// See the HandlerContext interface below for all available params
const handler = async ({ request, params }) => {
  return new Response('Hello')
}

When used in a service worker context the handler must return a Response object, if the route matches.

When used in conjunction with helper methods like router.handleRequest and router.handleEvent the handler function will be called automatically with an object, containing the following signature:

interface HandlerContext {
  params: any | null
  handler: HandlerFunction
  url: URL
  method: string
  route: Route
  request?: Request
  event?: FetchEvent
  ctx: any
}

API

Match

router.match(url: URL | string, method: string): MatchResult | null

Matches a supplied URL and HTTP method against the registered routes. url can be a string (path or full URL) or URL instance.

router.get('/user/:id', handler)
 
router.match('/user/1337', 'GET')
// => { params: { id: '1337' }, handler: [AsyncFunction: handler],  url...

The return value is a MatchResult object or null if no matching route was found.

interface MatchResult {
  params: any | null
  handler: HandlerFunction
  url: URL
  method: string
  route: Route
  request?: Request
  event?: FetchEvent
  ctx: any
}

router.matchRequest(request: Request): MatchResult | null

Will match a Request object (e.g. event.request) against the registered routes. Will return null or a MatchResult object.

addEventListener('fetch', event => {
  const match = router.matchRequest(event.request)
  console.log(match)
  // => { params: { user: 'bob' }, handler: [AsyncFunction: handler], ...
})

router.matchEvent(event: FetchEvent): MatchResult | null

Will match a FetchEvent object (e.g. event) against the registered routes. Will return null or a MatchResult object.

addEventListener('fetch', event => {
  const match = router.matchEvent(event)
  console.log(match)
  // => { params: { user: 'bob' }, handler: [AsyncFunction: handler], ...
})

Handle

router.handle(url: URL | string, method: string): HandleResult | null

Will match a string or URL instance against the registered routes and call it's handler function automatically (with HandlerContext).

const result = router.handle('/user/bob', 'GET')

Will return null or the matched route and handler promise as HandleResult:

interface HandleResult {
  match: MatchResult
  handlerPromise: HandlerPromise
}

router.handleRequest(request: Request): HandleResult | null

Will match a FetchEvent object against the registered routes and call it's handler function automatically (with HandlerContext).

addEventListener('fetch', event => {
  const result = router.handleRequest(event.request)
  if (result) {
    event.respondWith(result.handlerPromise)
  } else {
    console.log('No route matched.')
  }
})

Will return null or the matched route and handler promise as HandleResult.

router.handleEvent(event: FetchEvent): HandleResult | null

Will match a FetchEvent object against the registered routes. If a route matches it's handler will be called automatically and passed to event.respondWith(handler). If no route matches nothing happens. :-)

addEventListener('fetch', event => {
  router.handleEvent(event)
})

Will return null or the matched route and handler promise as HandleResult.

Context (Since v1.7.5)

You can optionally add a context (router.ctx = { foobar: 123 }) to the router, which will be passed on to the handlers as part of HandlerContext. An example (also how to do this type safe) can be found in the test fixture.

Limitations

  • No middleware support
    • In service workers one needs to respond with a definitive Response object (when responding to a fetch event), so this paradigm doesn't really fit here.

Examples

See also

  • workbox-router
  • sw-toolbox

License

MIT

Install

npm i service-worker-router

DownloadsWeekly Downloads

832

Version

1.7.5

License

MIT

Unpacked Size

258 kB

Total Files

22

Last publish

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