runjob

1.1.2 • Public • Published

runjob

A Javascript Jobrunner with human syntax

Features

  • Jobs
  • Queues
  • Chains

Install

npm install runjob

Import

const Job = require('runjob')

Creating a Job

const myJob = new Job(function () {
    console.log('Look mum, I got a job!')
}, 'MyJob')

The name (second argument) is optional and is only relevant for the Job.tree() function

Executing a Job

Now

myJob.run.now()

In 500 ms

myJob.run.in(500).ms()

In 2 seconds

myJob.run.in(2).seconds()

In 3 minutes

myJob.run.in(3).minutes()

Every 500 ms

myJob.run.every(500).ms()

Every 2 seconds

myJob.run.every(2).seconds()

Every 3 minutes

myJob.run.every(3).minutes()

At a specific Date

myJob.run.at(new Date().getTime() + 3000) // Run at the Date in 3 seconds
myJob.run.at(new Date(new Date().getTime() + 4000)) // Run at the Date in 4 seconds
myJob.run.at(new Date()) // Run now

List all Jobs

Just simply run

Job.tree()

Queues

A queue handles jobs successively and fires an event when the queue is empty. Queues also work like they are a job, so you can use something like myQueue.run.in(2).seconds() to handle it at a certain time.

Creating a Queue

const myQueue = new Job.Queue()

Adding Jobs to a queue

First you need to create a few jobs. Then you can add them to the queue like this:

myQueue.add(jobOne, jobTwo)
myQueue.add(jobThree)

Handling a Queue

myQueue.handle().then(() => {
    console.log('Queue finished!')
})

Chains

Chains are like queues, but they work simultaneously. This means that if the Chain is handled all jobs are started at the same time.

You can use a Chain exactly like a Queue, but you have to use Job.Chain instead of Job.Queue. It's also important to know that Chains don't fire an event if they finished, so you can't use myChain.handle().then() and have to use myChain.handle()

Package Sidebar

Install

npm i runjob

Weekly Downloads

1

Version

1.1.2

License

MIT

Unpacked Size

21.5 kB

Total Files

6

Last publish

Collaborators

  • greencoder001