rrrrr-request

0.0.1 • Public • Published

React Request

Travis build status npm version Test Coverage gzip size

A library for making HTTP requests with React. Inspired by React Apollo.

Motivation

React Apollo exports a higher-order component that makes network requests for you. Although Apollo is designed to work specifically with GraphQL, many of the features of React Apollo make sense outside of that context.

This library abstracts those features into a generic HTTP component.

Features

✓ Uses the native fetch API
✓ Smart deduping of requests
✓ Customizable response caching
✓ Expressive API for parallel requests
✓ Small footprint (~2kb gzipped)

Installation

This package is not currently distributed on npm, but it will be shortly.

Documentation

Getting Started

Here's a quick look at what using React Request is like:

import React, { Component } from 'react';
import { Fetch } from 'react-request';
 
class App extends Component {
  render() {
    return (
      <Fetch
        url="https://jsonplaceholder.typicode.com/posts/1"
        render={({ fetching, error, data }) => {
          if (fetching) {
            return <div>Loading data...</div>;
          }
 
          if (error) {
            return <div>There was a network error.</div>;
          }
 
          return (
            <div>
              <div>Post ID: {data.id}</div>
              <div>Post Title: {data.title}</div>
            </div>
          );
        }}
      />
    );
  }
}

Need to make multiple requests? We got you.

import React, { Component } from 'react';
import { FetchComposer } from 'react-request';
 
class App extends Component {
  render() {
    return (
      <FetchComposer
        requests={[
          <Fetch url="https://jsonplaceholder.typicode.com/posts/1" />,
          <Fetch
            url="https://jsonplaceholder.typicode.com/posts/1"
            method="DELETE"
          />
        ]}
        render={([readPost, deletePost]) => {
          return (
            <div>
              {readPost.fetching && 'Loading post 1'}
              {!readPost.fetching && 'Post 1 is not being fetched'}
              <button onClick={() => deletePost.fetch()}>Delete Post 1</button>
            </div>
          );
        }}
      />
    );
  }
}

These examples just scratch the surface of what you can do with React Request. Check out the API reference below for more.

API

This library has two exports:

  • Fetch: A component for making a single HTTP request
  • FetchComposer: A component for making parallel HTTP requests

<Fetch />

A component for making a single HTTP request. It accepts every value of init and input from the fetch() API as a prop, in addition to a few other things.

The props that come from the fetch() method are:

  • url
  • method: defaults to "GET"
  • body
  • credentials
  • headers
  • mode
  • cache
  • redirect
  • referrer: defaults to "about:client"
  • referrerPolicy: defaults to ""
  • integrity: defaults to ""
  • keepalive
  • signal

To learn more about the valid options for these props, refer to the fetch() documentation.

Here's an example demonstrating some of the most commonly-used props:

<Fetch
  url="/posts/2"
  method="patch"
  credentials="same-origin"
  headers={{
    'csrf-token': myCsrfToken
  }}
  body={JSON.stringify({ title: 'New post' })}
  render={({ fetch }) => {
    <button onClick={() => fetch()}>Update Post</button>;
  }}
/>

In addition to the fetch() props, there are a number of other useful props.

render

The render prop of this component. It is called with one argument, result, an object with the following keys:

  • fetching: A Boolean representing whether or not a request is currently in flight for this component
  • error: A Boolean representing if a network error occurred. Note that HTTP "error" status codes do not cause error to be true; only failed or aborted network requests do. For more, see the "Using Fetch" MDN guide.
  • response: An instance of Response. The body will already be read, and made available to you as response.data.
  • data: An alias of response.data.
  • fetch: A function that makes the HTTP request. See notes below.
  • url: The URL that was passed into <Fetch />.
  • requestName: The name of the request (see requestName below)

There are three common use cases for the fetch prop:

  • For GET requests, it can allow users to refresh the data
  • Anytime there is a network error, you can use this function to retry the request
  • When lazy is true, you can use this to actually make the request, typically as a result of user input

fetch accepts one argument: options. Any of the fetch() options described above are valid options. This allows you to customize the request from within the component.

lazy

Whether or not the request will be called when the component mounts. The default value is based on the request method that you use.

Method Default value
GET, HEAD, OPTIONS false
POST, PUT, PATCH, DELETE true
<Fetch
  url="/books"
  lazy
  render={({ fetch }) => {
    <button onClick={() => fetch()}>Fetch books</button>;
  }}
/>
onResponse

A function that is called every time a response is received. Receives two arguments: error and response. This could be used for analytics or syncing response data with a store such as Redux.

<Fetch
  url="/posts/2"
  onResponse={(error, response) => {
    if (error) {
      console.log('Ruh roh', error);
    } else {
      console.log('Got a response!', response);
    }
  }}
  render={() => {
    <div>Hello</div>;
  }}
/>
transformData

A function that is called with the data returned from the response. You can use this hook to transform the data before it is passed into render.

<Fetch
  url="/posts/2"
  transformData={data => {
    return data.post;
  }
  render={({ fetching, error, response, data }) => {
    <div>
      {fetching && ('Loading...')}
      {error && ('There was an error.')}
      {!fetching && !error && response.status === 200 && (
        <div>
          <h1>{data.title}</h1>
          <div>{data.content}</div>
        </div>
      )}
    </div>
  }}
/>
responseType

The content type of the response body. Defaults to json. Valid values are the methods on Body.

// If you have an endpoint that just returns raw text, you can convert it into
// an object using `responseType` and `transformData`.
<Fetch
  url="/countries/2"
  responseType="text"
  transformData={countryName => {
    return {
      countryName
    };
  }}
  render={({ data }) => {
    <div>{data.countryName}</div>;
  }}
/>
requestName

A name to give this request, which can help with debugging purposes. The request name is analogous to a function name in JavaScript. Although we could use anonymous functions everywhere, we tend to give them names to help humans read and debug the code.

<Fetch url={`/posts/${postId}`} requestName="readPost" />

Note: This feature is analogous to the operation name in GraphQL.

fetchPolicy

This determines how the request interacts with the cache. Valid options are:

  • "cache-first"
  • "cache-and-network"
  • "network-only"
  • "cache-only"

For documentation on this prop, refer to the response caching guide.

This prop behaves identically to the Apollo prop with the same name.


<FetchComposer />

A component that simplifies making parallel requests.

requests

An array of Fetch components. Use any of the above props, but leave out render.

Note: if you pass a render prop, it will be ignored.

render

A function that is called with the array of responses from requests.

import React, { Component } from 'react';
import { FetchComposer } from 'react-request';
 
class App extends Component {
  render() {
    const { bookId, authorId } = this.props;
 
    return (
      <FetchComposer
        requests={[
          <Fetch url={`/books/${bookId}`} />,
          <Fetch url={`/authors/${authorId}`} />,
          <Fetch url={`/books/${bookId}`} method="DELETE" />
        ]}
        render={([readBook, readAuthor, deleteBook]) => {
          return (
            <div>
              {readBook.fetching && 'Fetching book'}
              {readAuthor.fetching && 'Fetching author'}
              {!readBook.fetching && 'Book not being fetched'}
              {!readAuthor.fetching && 'Author not being fetched'}
              <button onClick={() => deleteBook.fetch()}>
                Delete this book
              </button>
            </div>
          );
        }}
      />
    );
  }
}

Acknowledgements

This library was inspired by Apollo. The library Holen was referenced during the creation of this library.

Package Sidebar

Install

npm i rrrrr-request

Weekly Downloads

2

Version

0.0.1

License

MIT

Last publish

Collaborators

  • jmeas